Last spring, the legislature passed a law requiring foods that contain genetically modified organisms, or GMO's, to be labeled. That labeling will go into effect in 2016 and the Attorney General's office has been working to come up with rules for what the labels will look like.

The state has just released a draft proposal of those rules and is holding informal meetings around the state this week to get public feedback.

If states were graded for their work on infrastructure, Vermont would earn a C.  That’s according to a report released by the American Society of Civil Engineers that recently assessed the state’s roads, bridges, dams, landfills and waterworks.  For comparison, the nation as a whole earned a D+

While Vermont has made progress with roads and bridges, the report indicates waste-water and drinking water infrastructure is still woefully outdated and underfunded.

The Vermont Jazz Center has been honored with a national Acclaim Award from Chamber Music America. The award recognizes arts organizations around the country for “extraordinary cultural contributions” in the regions they serve.

The award was presented Saturday at a concert at the jazz center’s performance space at the Cotton Mill, an old Brattleboro factory. Vermont Jazz Center Director Eugene Uman says the space invites creativity.

Vermont’s state employees are going to be hit with a nearly 18 percent increase in their health care premiums. The increase is taking place because more state employees than projected were treated last year for cancer and heart disease. The increase came as a shock because the VSEA plan had no increases in the past two years.

Human Resources Commissioner Maribeth Spellman says the increase is directly related to much higher than expected use of expensive health care services.

The sale of IBM’s chip-making business looks to be good news for the approximately 4,000 Vermont workers employed at the company’s plant in Essex Junction. But the change in ownership will reignite a longstanding debate over whether Vermont is doing enough to retain and grow jobs in the state.

IBM has always been a flashpoint in Vermont politics. It’s a massive employer here, by the standards of this tiny state. And policy makers frequently stop to ask: is Vermont doing enough to keep employers like Big Blue happy?

"It's been a long summer," says Frank Cioffi of the Greater Burlington Industrial Corporation, referring the long-awaited announcement that IBM is offloading its microchip manufacturing division, which includes the IBM plant in Essex Junction, to GlobalFoundries. We look at why IBM is paying Global Foundries $1.5 billion over three years to take over that business, what it means for employees,  and the impact on the state's economy.

The deal between IBM and GlobalFoundries for IBM’s chip manufacturing and sales divisions doesn’t fit the traditional definition of the word “sale.” In a sale, the money goes to one party and some asset or commodity goes to the other.

How To Pick A Pumpkin

15 hours ago

On Halloween night, front porches across Vermont will be illuminated by the glow of hand-carved Jack-o’-Lanterns. Some will sport a classic spooky grin, while others might be a bit more intricate.

Carving a Jack-o’-Lantern that will catch the eye of your neighborhood trick-or-treaters - perhaps just enough to prevent them from smashing your handiwork – is yet another Halloween tradition.

Erin Lucey spoke to Joe Weaver, who owns Red Barn Gardens on Route 2 in Williston with his wife Carolyn. He gave us some tips on what makes a pumpkin ideal for carving.

With the announcement Monday morning that IBM is offloading its chip division, including its plant in Essex Junction, to the California-based semiconductor manufacturer GlobalFoundries, we sifted through the archives to find photographs of the plant's early days, IBM products at use in Vermont and beyond, and the shifting fortunes of the company and its local employees through the years.

Here's what the approach to the Essex plant looked like in 1958:

Publicly held companies have a financial responsibility to their shareholders: they have to make money. But benefit corporations can be responsible to the environment, their employees, and their communities. Businesses that have become benefit corporations say they are taking it into their own hands to make the world a better place.

We’ll talk to Tom Payne of King Arthur Flour and Ashley Orgain of Seventh Generation, two Vermont companies who have gone through the certification process to become benefit companies.

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