John Dillon / VPR

How many times has the sight of long antennae, a shiny exoskeleton or a frenetically flying insect prompted the phrase, "What is that?!"

Nina Keck / VPR

Write ups in USA Today, The New York Times and several travel guides have made the Dorset Quarry one of the most popular swimming holes in Vermont. YouTube videos and Facebook posts have meant even more visitors. And while many think the historic quarry is a public park, it’s privately owned by a couple who says it might be time for more help in running the area.

Ric Cengeri / VPR

When it comes to Revolutionary-era forts on Lake Champlain, Mount Independence seems to get short shrift behind others, like Fort Ticonderoga. Actually, the two were connected by a bridge and Mount Independence housed three times as many soldiers as Fort Ti in 1776.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

The newest arrival to electoral politics in Vermont is looking to boost the prospects of progressive candidates in 2016, and it wants to leave its mark on the Democratic gubernatorial primary.

In the world of statewide politics, multi-candidate gubernatorial primaries are a rare and interesting beast. The mid-summer election isn't conducive to large turnouts. And with several candidates vying for such a small pool of support, it doesn't take a whole lot of votes to win a major-party nomination.

Potentially toxic cyanobacteria blooms were present up and down Lake Champlain during the last week in July, according to a report from the Lake Champlain Committee. Data from the Vermont Department of Health show that liver toxins were present in St. Albans Bay that week as well.

Christophe Boisson / Thinkstock

There is a long history of military engagements between the United States and Canada, including secret full-scale invasion plans from as recent as the '20s and '30s.

Vermont Edition spoke to author Kevin Lippert about these plans, and his new book, War Plan Red: The United States' Secret Plan to Invade Canada and Canada's Secret Plan to Invade the United States.

Erin Lucey / VPR

The thought of setting off into the woods with only the gear on your back can be a bit daunting. There's the danger of over-packing, which can lead to sore shoulders, or of forgetting something and being unprepared for what nature throws at you.

One of the few Abenaki speakers in the world is Jesse Bowman Bruchac of Saratoga Springs, New York, and he's worked for most of his adult life to teach and preserve Abenaki.  "Every language holds within it an entire understanding of the world," says Bruchac. "When we lose a language, we've lost some of the diversity of human thought."

FikMik / iStock

"Kwai!" is an Abenaki greeting that even fewer people are going to understand in upcoming years. Language is constantly evolving, just as humans do. However, this means that as some languages become more dominant, others come to an end.

More than 800 low-income households have gotten at least a temporary reprieve from reductions in welfare assistance that had been scheduled to take effect this week.

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