Angela Evancie / VPR File Photo

Tristram Coffin, the U.S. Attorney for the district of Vermont, said he is resigning next month to take a job in private practice.

"I'm going to be reluctantly stepping down and taking on another job beginning Jan. 12," he said. "It's an excellent opportunity, but I will be leaving this job feeling it's been an amazing time here. We've got such an incredible office here and terrific people."

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

Vermont Gas Systems announced Friday that it faces additional cost overruns for its pipeline to Addison County. 

The company is not ruling out a rate increase to pay for the new costs. And officials say they will ask regulators to delay proceedings on the the next phase of the project, pending revised cost estimates for that phase.  

Costs have gone up substantially since the project was first submitted to regulators a year ago.

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Tell us a story! Vermont Edition's annual music show is Friday, and this year we want to know what song encapsulates 2014 for you.  What music do you associate with your strongest memories of the last year?

It can be an old or new song, funny or serious, about your personal life or our collective memory.  Tell us about the soundtrack to your year by posting below or visiting our Facebook page.

Some organizations who support Gov. Peter Shumlin's decision to back away from single-payer health care say there are other health care reform efforts that could have a positive impact on medical costs. 

Tom Torti, president and CEO of the Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce, is one of those watching the health care reform efforts closely. As part of the governor's business advisory council, Torti said he has seen various scenarios for how to fund single payer and was worried about the price tag.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

Hospitals in New Hampshire and Vermont are making progress in the battle against a leading cause of death. Sepsis is triggered by infection and causes inflammation through the entire body. But Emergency Departments are now intervening quickly to save lives. 

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Gov. Peter Shumlin’s decision to abandon his plan for single-payer health care has spurred feelings of relief, anger, surprise and confusion. And the political bombshell has everyone trying to figure out what’s next for health care reform.

About 60 protestors made their way down Main Street in Montpelier on Thursday, carrying cardboard effigies of the same Democratic governor they worked to elect not so long ago.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

A new report on the Department for Children and Families sheds light on the major difficulties the department has faced in handling the opiate crisis Gov. Peter Shumlin brought to the fore in January.

The report suggests, and officials confirm, that DCF was caught off-guard by just how much opiate abuse and addiction would affect the department's work.

Deputy DCF commissioner Cindy Walcott doesn't dance around it: The agency wasn't ready for the dramatic impact drugs would have on child safety work.

Travis Quetel / Vermont State Parks

Last week, the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation issued a water quality certification governing the future operations of Green Mountain Power’s Waterbury hydroelectric project.

New York Moves To Ban Fracking

23 hours ago
Office of Gov. Cuomo / Flickr

The Cuomo administration will move to ban hydrofracking citing unresolved health issues and dubious economic benefits of the widely used gas-drilling technique.

The news came at a meeting of the governor’s cabinet where Health Commissioner Howard Zucker and Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joe Martens summarized the findings of their environmental and health reviews.

The Governor distanced himself from the decision and referred questions to Zucker and Martens.

Angela Evancie / VPR

The prospect of single-payer health care in Vermont is no more, at least for now.

Gov. Peter Shumlin announced Wednesday that he is backing away from his signature policy push that would have made Vermont the first state in the nation with a publicly financed health care system overseen by state government. The governor now says that the taxes required to pay for such a system would simply be too much for Vermont to bear.

Gov. Shumlin came to the VPR studios to talk with host Alex Keefe about his decision and what comes next.

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