House Republicans held a press conference Tuesday after they voted to sustain Gov. Phil Scott's budget veto. GOP lawmakers say they'll continue to reject any spending plan that allows for the possibility of an increase in property tax rates.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

House Republicans Sustain Scott's Budget Veto

Republicans may have minority status in the Vermont House of Representatives, but they showed Tuesday they’re still a force to be reckoned with.

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A shot from above of the interior of the House chamber at the Vermont Statehouse.
Angela Evancie / VPR FILE

A vote to override Gov. Phil Scott's budget veto has failed, sending lawmakers back to the drawing board as the clock ticks closer to a possible state government shutdown. On Vermont Edition, we're talking with reporters about how we got to this point, where the negotiations go next and what the final budget might end up looking like.

Samel Williams and grandson Walter G. McClain, who donated this photo to the Lowcountry Digital History Initiative.
The McClain Family

Samuel Williams was just a boy when he was liberated from slavery in South Carolina. He eventually made his way to Springfield, Vermont, where he raised a family and wrote a pseudonymous memoir, giving voice to his early life in slavery and the struggles of starting over. 

A stretch of road with a mini cell tower on a utility pole that a car is driving by.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR/File

The state says it can’t force Consolidated Communications to turn its DSL service back on for the troubled CoverageCo cell phone provider.

Fred Tuttle, left, and Jack McMullen squared off in a now-notorious debate during the 1998 Republican primary.
VPR file/Tim Johnson, VPR

Twenty years ago a political debate on VPR pitted a retired dairy farmer against a Harvard-educated Vermont newcomer in the Republican primary for the U.S. Senate. We're looking at back on the Tuttle-McMullen debate, how it affected the 1998 election and what the debate says about Vermont politics and values.

Updated at 7:55 p.m. ET

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen is continuing to defend the Trump administration's controversial "zero tolerance" policy that results in separating children from their parents who enter the U.S. illegally.

Nielsen appeared at the White House press briefing on Monday, falsely blaming Democrats for the current crisis and arguing that the impetus is on Congress to pass a law to close legal loopholes.

Headshot of John Killacky.
Todd R. Lockwood, Courtesy

Since 2010, John Killacky has been the executive director of the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts in Burlington. Last fall, Killacky announced his plan to step down in June 2018.

Killacky's tenure at the Flynn comes to an end this month, but he has plans to expand his roots in Vermont.

courtesy of Kate Hamilton, Office of Rep. Peter Welch

Rep. Peter Welch says children are being held in metal-fenced cages while many of their families seek asylum in the United States.

Updated at 4:28 p.m. ET

The Trump administration's decision to separate children from their families as a way to curb illegal immigration is adding fuel to an already fiery debate over immigration.

A group of House Democrats converged on an immigration detention facility in New Jersey on Sunday, days before a planned vote by House Republicans next week. Meanwhile, Trump administration officials alternately took credit and sought to distance the administration from the family separation policy.

A section where boaters can launch onto Berlin Pond from Mirror Lake Road, in Berlin, with a red hydrant and a guardrail.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

It’s been six years since a Vermont Supreme Court ruling opened Berlin Pond up for fishing. Until that time, recreational uses of the pond were banned because it’s a water source for Montpelier.

Now the Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife wants to hear from the people who fish there.

Dr. Hannah Rabin, left, talks with Danny Ciccariello, right, a phlebotomist, at Richmond Family Medicine.
Emily Corwin / VPR

High costs for routine medical labs at the University of Vermont Medical Center are pushing a growing number of medical providers in Chittenden County to look for alternatives out of state.

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Brave Little State

Artist Lois Eby, farmer Greg Cox and Supreme Court Associate Justice Marilyn Skoglund.
Amy Noyes/Nina Keck/Angela Evancie / VPR

Those 'Aging Hippies' Who Moved To Vermont ... Where Are They Now?

For the free-thinkers and radicals who moved to Vermont in the 1960s and 1970s, the past may be obscured in a cloud of … wood … smoke. But what does the present look like?

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Bychykhin_Olexandr / iStock.

What Questions Do You Have About Marijuana Legalization In Vermont?

Act 86 — allowing possession of up to an ounce of marijuana under state law — goes into effect July 1 . With less than a month to go, what do you want to know about how the law will work, and what you can and cannot do?

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More than 50 commentators provide perspective and opinion about current events, topics of interest, and often showcase the work of writers and storytellers.

Eye On The Sky

Join Us In Caledonia County June 28!

We're hitting the road to visit all 14 Vermont counties this summer and fall, and we want to meet you! Join us Thursday, June 28 at the Fairbanks Museum.

Daysie Awards

Vote For VPR!

We hope to be Vermont's pick for Best News Radio Station again this year in Seven Days' Daysie Awards! Please vote for us by June 25 - thank you!

The Latest From But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids!

Ants tend to live in large, specialized colonies where every individual has a job that benefits the whole community.
Cabezonification / iStock

Why Do Ants Bite?

Why do ants bite? Do both male and female ants have stingers? Do ants sleep? What do they do in the winter? In this episode we learn all about the fascinating world of ants with Brian Fisher , curator of entomology at the California Academy of Sciences. Fisher has identified about 1000 different species of ants!

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Timeline: From The Podcast Archives

U.S. Public Domain

Timeline: 20th Century Music

At the dawning of the 20 th century the world stood on the edge of immense change. No one could have guessed what the next hundred years would bring. Previous centuries saw most composers following specific aesthetic ideals, but music fractured in the 20 th century like never before. In reality, we’re still trying to figure out where music goes from here.

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