Things got so heated at Plainfield’s Select Board meeting Monday night in a discussion about Goddard College’s planned biomass-fueled heat plant, that one elected official told board members they’d be in “deep water” if they disregarded some residents’ wishes to have another meeting on it.

Courtesy Vermont Fresh Network

It wasn’t exactly a romantic event, but it was billed as a matchmaking opportunity, complete with a "speed dating" session.

Angela Evancie / VPR

Politics often makes for strange bedfellows. But the Statehouse alliance behind the budget this year is unusually odd. House Republicans have joined with Democratic leadership to ensure passage of the $5.6 billion spending plan.

Toby Talbot / AP/File

The House has given its preliminary approval to a $33 million tax bill that's part of an overall plan to reduce the state's $110 million dollar budget gap.

Ric Cengeri / VPR

“I play pinball a lot,” says Steve Daniels. He stands in front of a row of loud, flashing machines at the Pinball Coop in South Burlington.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

Lawmakers are taking a step they hope will increase voter participation.

By a vote of 20 to 7 Thursday afternoon, the Senate gave preliminary approval to a bill that would allow residents to register to vote on the day of an election. Currently, an individual who wishes to cast a vote on a Tuesday must have registered to vote by the previous Wednesday.

Liz LaVorgna and Shanta L.E. / Perfect Imperfections

Two Vermont photographers are tackling the problem of negative self-perception head on in their new project, Perfect Imperfections.

Pauline Rosenberg / iStock

Many of New England's native plants are in serious trouble, according to a new report released today by the New England Wildflower Society.

Stephen Martin

Orville Gibson went missing before dawn on the morning of New Years Eve in 1957. Three months later, his body was found in the Connecticut River, his legs and arms bound with rope.

Toby Talbot / AP

Governor Shumlin announced recently that the state will drop its health care exchange and move to the federal setup if the problems with Vermont Health Connect aren't fixed by the end of May. But he says he's confident that those benchmarks will be met.

So what is the likelihood of meeting those benchmarks? What happens to those Vermonters who have already enrolled in the Exchange? And why did some states get it right while Vermont struggled to make it work?

Chief of Health Care Reform Lawrence Miller answers those questions.  

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