VPR News
4:26 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Cheryl Hanna On VPR: A Collection Of Commentaries

Vermont Law School announced Monday that Cheryl Hanna, a law professor and longtime VPR Commentator, had died an "untimely death."
VPR

As colleagues, students, family and friends mourn the death of Vermont Law School professor and VPR commentator Cheryl Hanna, we present a collection of the commentaries — both legal and personal — that Hanna contributed to VPR over the years.

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The Frequency
2:16 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Vermont Law School Professor Cheryl Hanna Dies

Vermont Law School professor Cheryl Hanna, also a VPR Commentator and frequent guest on Vermont Edition, has died.
Vermont Law School

Vermont Law School has announced that Professor Cheryl Hanna, a prominent professor and expert in constitutional law, has died.

From the VLS announcement:

It is with the most profound sorrow that we announce the untimely death of our dear colleague Professor Cheryl Hanna.

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Vermont Edition
1:48 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Returning Out-Of-State Prisoners To Vermont

Vermont houses almost 500 prisoners in private out-of-state facilities.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Vermont sends nearly 500 prisoners to privately run out-of-state facilities in Kentucky and Arizona. The contract with the company that operates these jails, Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), comes up for renewal next year.

Now, a group of concerned Vermonters is proposing that room be made here to return these prisoners to the state.

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The Frequency
1:34 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Vermont Gas Ordered To Halt Digging Near VELCO Lines

The Vermont Public Service Board ordered Vermont Gas Systems to stop digging for its pipeline near power lines owned by the Vermont Electric Cooperative, citing environmental and health concerns.

Vermont Gas approached the Public Service Board after the state Agency of Natural Resources alerted the company to the possibility that soil contaminated with Pentachlorophenol (PCP) could be disturbed by pipeline construction.

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Vermont Edition
12:00 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

A Search For Meaning In A Life Close To Nature

In this photo taken Friday, July 13, 2012, stone pillars delineate the actual site of Henry David Throeau's cabin on the shores of Walden Pond in Concord, Mass.
Michael Dwyer AP

The 1960s and '70s saw a lot of people arrive in Vermont with the back-to-the-land movement. Their idealism followed the legacies of people like Helen and Scott Nearing, and even Henry David Thoreau well before them. On the next Vermont Edition, we discuss the impulse to find meaning in a life close to nature. Our guest is Rebecca Kneale Gould, a writer and senior lecturer at Middlebury College.

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The Frequency
11:56 am
Mon July 28, 2014

New Bill Makes It Easy To Transfer Cell Phones To New Carriers

Sen. Patrick Leahy joined an unlikely group in Burlington today to show off his new legislation that will make it easier for used cell phones to work on a variety of cellular networks.

At the Women Helping Battered Women offices in Burlington, Leahy introduced women’s advocates and a telecom official to speak about the new bill, which he said will help shelters like the one in Burlington.

Leahy said the new law will help shelters use donated phones to pass out to women in need.

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Environment
9:42 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Vt. Small Farms Under Scrutiny For Pollution Runoff

If you have four horses, you have a small farm, says John Roberts of the Vermont Agency of Agriculture. In an effort to reduce phosphorus pollution in Lake Champlain, the state is beginning to enforce runoff regulations on smaller scale operations.
Werner Stoffberg Thinkstock

The state of Vermont is working to reduce phosphorus pollution in the Lake Champlain watershed.

A lot of the focus has been on farms, and now the state is turning attention to smaller scale agriculture, and that means owners of much smaller parcels of land will also have to react to the regulations already on the books.

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Arts & Culture
5:00 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Take A Book, Leave A Book In Vermont's Tiniest Libraries

A little library awaits borrowers on Boynton Avenue in St. Johnsbury.
Charlotte Albright VPR

For many of us, summer is a time to kick back with a good book.  And in some neighborhoods, finding something new to read is as easy as strolling down the street. Little free libraries have been sprouting all over the world—including Vermont. Some are no bigger than a bird house. Others are as large as a phone booth. You leave a book, and take one—no card necessary.

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VPR News
8:00 am
Sun July 27, 2014

Wild Parsnip Foes Attempt To Slow Its Spread

Wild Parsnip resembles Queen Anne's Lace, but it's yellowish and can burn the skin.
Charlotte Albright VPR

Beware the wild parsnip.

That’s a warning sprouting in emails around the state, as the invasive weed spreads. It looks like a little yellow umbrella atop a stem that can be as long as five feet tall. It won’t hurt to brush along it, but if you break the stem, and the sap on your skin is exposed to sunlight, you can get a nasty burn. Harry Roberts, of Norwich, is seeing more and more of this pesky weed as he motorcycles around the state.

“It’s a very sinister plant and it starts at the roadside and if you don’t mow the adjacent field it takes over the field,” he says.

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Public Post
8:00 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Public Post: Emergency Alerts, Ski Lifts, Summer Festivals

Public Post looks into Vermont's customizable emergency alert system, which is online and expanding. Several ski areas have taken on major projects, from a new orange  "six pack bubble chairlift" at Okemo to a parking garage in Stowe. And now's the time to nominate your favorite summer or fall event for the Vermont Chamber's top ten list.

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