Gov-elect Phil Scott at a desk in 2016, and House Speaker Mitzi Johnson and Senate President Pro Tem Tim Ashe at a 2017 press conference.
Pete Hirschfeld / VPR Files

To Avoid Shutdown, Democratic Leaders Pitch New Strategy For Special Session

Both House Speaker Mitzi Johnson and Senate President Tim Ashe say a shutdown of state government on July 1 would be a disaster. And they've come up with a plan to avoid it.

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Shumlin Announces Release Of New Bird Atlas

Apr 3, 2013
AP File/Toby Talbot / Wild turkeys walk through the snow in Barre in this 2010 file photo. A new resource for understanding Vermont's bird populations

Governor Peter Shumlin helped mark the publication of a new book today that's a new resource for understanding Vermont's bird populations.

Second Atlas of Breeding Birds of Vermont, was produced with the help of 350 volunteers who donated thousands of hours compiling the information.

Shumlin says the atlas will help the state protect and build ecosystems where birds will thrive.

Now What? That's a fairly common question at select board and school board meetings this time of year, especially in down economy years.

What happens after municipal officials invest time, energy and money planning a project that the voters turn down at town meeting? Should they throw in the towel? Scale down the project and ask again? What about trying to do a better job explaining why the project is needed?

Planners in St. Albans know downtown parking is going to be a hassle this spring and summer. The city's downtown revitalization project will certainly make negotiating Main Street worse, before it makes it better. So to keep shoppers and other downtown business clientele coming, the city is offering up free off-street parking. The town's website states:

The momentum to reform Vermont’s earned income tax credit appeared to run out last week, but Governor Peter Shumlin continues to lobby a small group of state senators. He hopes to strike a deal on his proposal to subsidize child care by redirecting $17 million from the tax credit for poor working Vermonters.

A week after a key House committee narrowly rejected his plan, Shumlin has his work cut out for him in the Senate.

The very mention of Alzheimer's strikes fear into the hearts of many of us who have watched loved ones disappear into the dark depths of this disease.

Dr. William Pendlebury is a Professor of Pathology and Neurology and Director of the UVM Center on Aging and Fletcher Allen's Memory Center. She spoke with Vermont Edition about the search for a cure for Alzheimer's.

From social media to blogging to the digital revolution, the world of media news is changing, and if consumers once were expected to passively consume the news they get, they're now demanding more from the people who report the news of the day.

Dan Gillmor welcomes this future. And it's the goal of his new book and project, called Mediactive.

The State Public Service Board is hearing testimony on a proposed wood-chip-fired power plant in North Springfield.

The 35 megawatt project would be Vermont's largest biomass plant.

Developers of the proposed plant say it will create jobs and help the state meet its goals for renewable energy.

Winstanley Enterprises is the company behind the plan, and it built North Springfield Industrial Park, where the plant would be built.

Winstanley partnered with Weston Solutions, which specializes in sustainable power projects.

Job losses in the wake of Tropical Storm Irene were in many cases temporary, lasting only as long as it took businesses to repair damage from the flood.

The financial impact of those layoffs has been more lasting, but lawmakers may have found a way to soften the blow.

Senate Delays License Bill For Migrant Workers

Apr 3, 2013

The Vermont Senate is delaying action until next week on a bill allowing immigrant farm workers to become Vermont drivers.

The Senate was going to debate the measure this week. It was approved last week by the Transportation Committee by a vote of 4-1.

But now it's being sent to the Finance Committee for review because it contains a fee - which an immigrant would pay to get the special driving privilege card.

Lynx Sightings On The Rise

Apr 3, 2013

The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department says sightings of Canada lynx are on the rise in the Northeast Kingdom.

Officials say there were only four confirmed sightings of the animals in Vermont between the late 1700s and early 2000s but say sightings have been increasing every year since 2003.

The department is doing surveys to determine the extent and distribution of the animal in Vermont.

Lynx are listed as threatened under the federal endangered species act and as endangered in Vermont. They are rarely seen because they are nocturnal and secretive.

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The Latest From But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids!

Northern cardinals have distinctive colors and call to one another at dawn and dusk.
Tyler Pockette / courtesy

But Why LIVE: Hoots And Screeches And Whistles, Part 2

How fast can the fastest bird go (and what bird is it?) Why do birds have wings? How do they fly? Why are birds so colorful? And why do they sing at dawn and dusk? In the second part of our live show in April with Bird Diva Bridget Butler, we learn all about birds, and get some lessons in how to sing like our avian neighbors!

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Brave Little State

Men work in a granite processing facility.
Vermont Historical Society

What's The History Of French Canadian Immigration Into Vermont?

There was a time when it was totally normal to hear French spoken in some of Vermont’s smallest towns and biggest cities.

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Timeline: From The Podcast Archives

U.S. Public Domain

Timeline: Music Is About Venue

Music has always been created with a specific venue in mind. The composer may not know who will be in the audience or how it will be received but they know it has to be played on an instrument or sound system in a place. Throughout all of history, whether it was a church, a ballroom, a dance hall, an opera house or a dive bar, music was written to fill that location.

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