Two Townshend Elementary School students sit at a table.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

As School Boards Write Budgets, Community Debate Over Education Spending Continues

State government almost shut down earlier this year, and the fight was largely over education funding. And all of those debates in Montpelier, and negotiations over taxes and education costs? They’re all rooted in the decisions that local school boards make around this time of year.

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New From Brave Little State

Angela Evancie / VPR

What's It Like To Hike The Long Trail?

The 272-mile Long Trail follows Green Mountain ridgelines from one end of Vermont to another. So what’s it like to hike the whole thing?

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A man kneels on the ground outside of a tiny house in the woods of the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont.
Jon Kalish / For VPR

Since 2012, a group of tiny house enthusiasts has gathered in the woods of the Northeast Kingdom to participate in hands-on building workshops. It's known as Tiny House Summer Camp.

Secretary Of State Jim Condos is seeking his fifth term in that office in the Nov. 6 election.
Darron Cummings / Associated Press

After serving four terms as Vermont’s Secretary of State, Jim Condos says there is still unfinished business he would like to accomplish. That's why he is seeking a fifth term in office and will be the Democratic candidate on the ballot on Vermont's Nov. 6 election.

Anya Tynio is challenging incumbent Rep. Peter Welch for Vermont's seat in the U.S. House of Representatives.
Matthew Smith / VPR

Political newcomer Anya Tynio is using her first run for political office to try to unseat six-term incumbent Democrat Peter Welch in the Nov. 6 election.

At 25 years old, Tynio is the youngest an individual can be to run for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. She says her fresh perspective is an advantage for taking on big issues facing Vermont and the country.

Stock image of fiber-optic cables.
kynny / iStock

The Public Utility Commission is opening an investigation into service complaints toward Consolidated Communications.

The sign outside a wood door that reads Committee on the Judiciary: This room is equipped with an assistive listening system. Please silence all electronic devices before entering. SD 226
J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh will be back before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday, as will Christine Blasey Ford, who alleges Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in the 1980s. Kavanaugh denies the allegations.

Maisie Twohig, 10, drinks from a water fountain at Grafton Elementary School.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The Department of Environmental Conservation will extend its testing program for PFAS chemicals in the drinking water at Vermont schools.

Sign outside of Uber headquarters in San Francisco.
Eric Risberg / Associated Press File

Uber drivers in Vermont whose personal data was hacked in 2016 are in line to receive $100 payments from the state.

Updated at 9:24 p.m. ET

During a rare press conference Wednesday, President Trump sent mixed messages about the fate of his embattled Supreme Court nominee, Judge Brett Kavanaugh.

President Donald Trump shakes hands with Brett Kavanaugh.
Alex Brandon / Associated Press

Following the release of a sworn affidavit containing new sexual misconduct allegations against U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, Sen. Patrick Leahy and his fellow Judiciary Committee Democrats are calling on President Donald Trump to either withdraw Kavanaugh's nomination or launch an FBI investigation into the allegations of misconduct and assault.

The Senate Judiciary Committee is scheduled to hear this week from Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and his accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, over sexual assault allegations.

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a school shooting that didn't happen, and the surprising things that did

More than 50 commentators provide perspective and opinion about current events, topics of interest, and often showcase the work of writers and storytellers.

The VPR - Vermont PBS Debates

VPR and Vermont PBS are collaborating on a series of four debates this month. View the full schedule and submit your questions for the candidates.

A 5-part podcast about a school shooting that didn't happen, and the surprising things that did.

The Latest From But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids

Our bodies are made up of cells. Cancer happens when cells divide out of control.
JackBlack3D / istock

Why Do People Get Cancer?

A cancer diagnosis can be scary, and for kids it can be bewildering. We've gotten some questions about cancer and in this episode we answer them with Dr. Donald Small, director of pediatric oncology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. We answer how people get sick when it's not caused by germs, how people get cancer, and why cancer "does not have a cure." There's nothing graphic or scary in this episode, but adults may want to give this episode a listen if cancer is something your littles have been dealing with.

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