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All three members of Vermont's congressional delegation - Sen. Bernie Sanders, Rep. Peter Welch and Sen. Patrick Leahy - are critical of President Donald Trump's comments regarding the violence in Charlottesville, Va., this past weekend.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press File

The three members of Vermont's congressional delegation have criticized President Donald Trump for his comments about this past weekend's violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

VPR

This month on Outdoor Radio, we’ll venture out into a meadow of wild flowers that is literally singing with bumble bees. Biologists Kent McFarland and Sara Zahendra talk about the species we find in Vermont, the different ways they pollinate our flowers and crops, and the environmental factors that are threatening their population.

Paul Costello, left, and Peter Walke, are co-chairs of the governor's Vermont Climate Action Commission, which met for the first time Tuesday. They say Vermont can use emissions-reduction initiatives to advance the state economy.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

Gov. Phil Scott’s newly minted Climate Action Commission held its first meeting Tuesday, and while past Vermont governors have also convened special panels to study the issue, commission members insist this latest one will deliver results.

St. Michael's College graduates Danny Divis, left, and Justin McKenzie, right, throw out first pitches at the Boston Red Sox's "Vermont Night" at Fenway Park on Aug. 5. The two hockey players were awarded the Hockey Humanitarian Award last spring.
Dan Brown / Kapitol Photography

Danny Divis and Justin McKenzie, recent St. Michael's College graduates who played on the hockey team, started the mental health awareness campaign Hope Happens Here while they were students. This past spring they were recognized with the Hockey Humanitarian Award, a national honor for collegiate athletes who give back to their community.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

After more than eight years, Vermont Public Radio's President and CEO Robin Turnau will be stepping down.

Vermont's shortage of primary care doctors will soon get worse because a number of them will retire in the next few years.
shironosov / iStock

Many states across the country have a need to attract more primary care physicians, but Vermont's situation has an additional twist - a sizeable number of the state's primary care doctors are expected to retire in the next few years.

A Canadian police officer warns a young man from Yemen that if he illegally crosses into Canada in between checkpoints he will be arrested. If he proves to not be a threat to the public, the officers will help him fill out the asylum request paperwork.
Kathleen Masterson / VPR

The number of asylum-seekers fleeing the U.S. into Canada is surging this summer, with nearly 800 people illegally walking into Quebec in June alone.

Betty Smith Mastaler, seen here in 1978, talked to "Vermont Edition" recently about her first years at VPR and the state of the station.
VPR file

Aug. 13, 2017 marked Vermont Edition's 10th anniversary, and the 40th anniversary of Vermont Public Radio. To mark the occasion, we talked to someone who has been with the station for more than 40 years and has done a little bit of everything: Betty Smith Mastaler.

Nicholas Erwin / flickr

Next week, people across the country will turn their eyes - hopefully safely protected - to the skies to watch a rare solar eclipse. We're looking up too. We'll talk about the eclipse, and about stargazing, astronomy, and all the latest from space - including the dramatic final mission of the Saturn probe Cassini. 

Nina Keck / VPR

Nearly 200 people gathered in Rutland Monday night to publicly condemn the racism and violence that erupted during Saturday’s white supremacists rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, that left one woman dead and many others injured.

James Ehlers, seen here at a Statehouse rally earlier this year, says Vermont voters will appreciate a progressive agenda that includes a $15 minimum wage and tax increases on the wealthy.
Brenda Patoine, courtesy

The next gubernatorial election is still more than a year away, and it's been more than 50 years since an incumbent governor lost a reelection bid in Vermont. But the leading Democratic challenger to Gov. Phil Scott says he thinks the Republican incumbent is vulnerable.

Brittany Caine-Conley, Congregate Charlottesville's lead organizer, speaks to those gathered at a vigil on Sunday, Aug. 13 at the site where the day before a car crashed into people protesting a white nationalist rally in the city.
Steve Helber / Associated Press

White supremacy, violence and even death played out in the streets of Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend. On this Vermont Edition, we'll discuss how we talk about these recent events and also look at what we can do here to address the issues raised.

Pat Embree of Rutland is one of more than 4,700 Vermonter seniors who receive home delivered food with Meals on Wheels.
Nina Keck / VPR

Meals on Wheels brings nutritious food to more than 15,000 Vermonters a year, most of them over age 60.

Nationally, data show the program saves lives and billions of dollars a year in health care spending. Yet increasing demand on top of funding shortfalls are forcing program administrators across Vermont to make tough choices.

EclipseSundial.com creators Dan Axtell (left) and Bill Gotesman pose at the Burlington Earth Clock, along the bike path. Gottesman also designed the sundial at the center of the stone circle.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

On August 21, the entire North American continent will witness a full or partial eclipse of the sun. And a couple of Vermonters have come up with an activity that anyone can do to tell time as they follow the eclipse’s progress.

We're talking about the impact of income sensitivity on school budgets across the state.
Don Kurto / iStock

Vermont has a program – known as income sensitivity - that allows some homeowners to pay their school taxes based on their income and not the value of their property.

Kevin Mullin, chairman of the Green Mountain Care Board, says he worries premium increases for next year's health insurance plans may cause some Vermonters to lose coverage.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

State regulators have ratcheted down the premium increases sought by the Vermont’s largest private health insurer, but one key official says rate hikes for next year’s plans will still be “ridiculously high.”

Gov. Phil Scott is reconsidering his opposition to a primary enforcement seat belt law.
Angela Evancie / VPR

Throughout his political career as a state senator, lieutenant governor and now as governor, Phil Scott has always opposed legislation that would allow police to stop drivers who are not wearing a seat belt. But the governor says he's now rethinking how he feels about this issue.

When you're the economist for the Vermont legislature, sometimes you have to deliver unwelcome news to lawmakers.

VPR/Melody Bodette

Middlebury's Porter Medical Center hit a low point in 2016. In the process of instituting cuts to deal with serious financial losses, staff morale suffered. 

Public Safety Commissioner Thomas Anderson speaks at a highway safety press conference in Waterbury on Tuesday afternoon. Following recent fatalities on Vermont roads, Anderson says there will be a greater presence of state and local police on roadways.
Bob Kinzel / VPR

Over a 48-hour period beginning this past weekend, eight people died in traffic accidents in various parts of the state. Vermont has rarely witnessed this many highway deaths in such a short period of time.

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