Amy Kolb Noyes

Public Post Reporter

Amy is an award winning journalist who has worked in print and radio in Vermont since 1991. She has been a VPR contributor since 2006, primarily covering the Lamoille Valley. Amy has a B.S in Broadcast Journalism from Syracuse University. She is author of Nontoxic Housecleaning, published as part of the Chelsea Green Guide series, and Living the Green Up Way, an activity and storybook published by Green Up Vermont.

Public Post

Amy is VPR's Public Post reporter, reporting stories and trends from Vermont cities and towns that are interesting and relevant to the entire state. Amy uses the Public Post app to monitor documents from Vermont's city and town websites and track news coming from local government. If you've got a story idea or news tip email Amy or reach out to her on Twitter.

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The Green Mountain Byway, as established a decade ago, ran from Route 2 in Waterbury Village and up Route 100 through Stowe. Now the byway has been extended to include four more Lamoille County towns.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

As peak foliage colors spread across the Green Mountains, it’s not a bad time to go for a drive or a bike ride. One good route is the newly-expanded Green Mountain Byway.

Participants at the Lamoille Works Workforce Development Meetup broke up into small groups to learn more about their colleagues and the work they do.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Vermont’s low unemployment rate can make it hard for employers to find workers. But it can also open up doors for people who face employment barriers.

The bar at Smugglers' Notch Distillery with posters of products and bottles lining the counter.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Next week Smugglers’ Notch Distillery plans a ribbon cutting celebration for its new space in Jeffersonville. It’s a prime example of ongoing economic changes in Lamoille County, as the forestry industry is replaced with businesses fueled by tourism.

Illustrator Harry Bliss, his dog Penny, author Kate DiCamillo and The Flying Pig Bookstore owner Elizabeth Bluemle pose at The Film House, in Burlington. All three (humans) happen to be creators of picture books about dogs, published by Candlewick Press.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Over the weekend, a crowd of picture book fans got a chance to meet award-winning author Kate DiCamillo and illustrator Harry Bliss, a part-time Burlington resident. Attendees also got to know one of the furry, four-legged inspirations for the duo's new picture book.

Third graders Max Becker, Anastasia Moshovetis and Eliza Frehsee, from left, hold up a question about Leo Arden, a character in one of Chris Harris' poems whose parents forgot to teach him the number eight.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

At Guilford Central School, the entire school – kindergarten through sixth grade – gets together for Community Music Time.

Sometimes musicians from the greater community come in to perform. But on the day Dorothy's List was there, it was small ensembles of sixth graders who took the spotlight to highlight a book they'd read.

The two toddlers currently enrolled at LouLou's Pre-K & Family Child Care have a lot of books and toys to choose from. Once the home day care is licensed by the state, up to ten children will be allowed to enroll.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

If you've ever looked for child care in Vermont, you know it can be tough to find openings. But it can also be a tough, and expensive, process for providers to open up and register with the state.

The organization Vermont Birth to Five is trying to help make it easier. 

Monday evening, a citizen group called Don't Undermine Memphremagog's Purity (DUMP) held a panel discussion about a proposed expansion of the Coventry landfill. The panelists sit along a table in front of a brick wall while one speaks.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Most of the trash generated in Vermont is trucked to the state’s only permitted landfill in the Northeast Kingdom. The landfill's owner has plans to expand it, and this week residents from both sides of the U.S.-Canada border pushed back on those plans.

The Elmore Town Hall at dusk
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Last weekend, the town of Elmore said goodbye to its summer residents with an annual block party and fireworks over the lake. While its year-round population is small enough that the old one-room schoolhouse is still in use, during the summer there’s been a lot going on.

Joe Slaimen uses electricity to bond two pieces of metal together as he demonstrates how arc welding works.
Amy Noyes / VPR

In this edition of Summer School we learn the art and science of arc welding with Joe Slaimen.

Viv Buckley and Des Hertz take a spin on the Kingdom Trails. Women make up between 30 and 40 percent of riders on the Northeast Kingdom trail network.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Mountain biking is big business in parts of the Northeast Kingdom. But what started out as a way to promote tourism has turned into a way of life for some residents.

Rep. Peter Welch and H. Brooke Paige.
Anna Ste. Marie, Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

Vermont Rep. Peter Welch won the Democratic nomination for a seventh term in the U.S. House and will face Republican candidate H. Brooke Paige in November's general election.  

Ross Murray (left) and Chris Planetta are on the board of directors for the Borderline Players. The troupe is in the midst of its first season at the Haskell Opera House, on the international border.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Next month a new theater troupe, the Borderline Players, will put on its first summer musical. You can see the show in the U.S. or Canada — depending on where in the theater you sit.

Hillary Bliss and her daughters Peyton, 8, and Ella, 10, of Morrisville, pick buckets full of berries at Pleasant Valley Blueberries, in Elmore.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

This week’s rain is a welcome development for many of Vermont’s pick-your-own berry businesses.

Artist Phil Godenschwager works in his Randolph studio on assembling a train car that represents the Waterbury Historical Society building, also known as Dr. Janes' house.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

A new train is coming to the old Central Vermont Railway line in Waterbury — but this one is being built to stay in one place for decades to come.

Revitalizing Waterbury Executive Director Karen Nevin says the annual Waterbury Arts Festival is her organization's primary fundraiser.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

This weekend's annual Waterbury Arts Festival is a big deal in town, it's a family-friendly event as well as a major fundraiser for the community development organization Revitalizing Waterbury.

Over the next few weeks the Vermont Mozart Festival will perform concerts at several northern Vermont venues including Shelburne Farms, the Charlotte Town Beach, Burlington Country Club and Trapp Family Lodge.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

The reimagined Vermont Mozart Festival kicks off its third season with a free concert in Burlington on Tuesday, July 17.

Wayside Restaurant owners Karen and Brian Zecchinelli show off some of their 100th anniversary swag. While they're celebrating all year long, a big ice cream social with fireworks is planned for July 29.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

This month, the Wayside Restaurant in Montpelier turns 100 years old. By serving up old-fashioned comfort food with a "made-in-Vermont" flair, it's one family restaurant that's found a recipe for success.

Green Mountain Conservation Camp instructors take part in aquatic ecology training at Buck Lake the week before the first campers arrive.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

There are plenty of lake homes in Woodbury, but not on Buck Lake. It's pretty much only home to a Green Mountain Conservation Camp.

Eliza Nellis, 7, and her brother Parker, 11, got to spend an early July day playing in the snow in Craftsbury.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

The sun was beating down and temperatures had climbed into the 90s as an annual block party in Craftsbury got underway this week. But a thick strip of snow in the backyard of one village home made it — by far — the coolest place in town.

Mike Hoffman and Ryan Podd of Northern Roots Nursery, in Hyde Park, stand among a greenhouse full of the hemp plants they cultivate for CBD production at Heady Vermont's Legalization Celebration on July 1.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Temperatures in the 90s seemed to keep attendance down at Heady Vermont's July 1 Legalization Celebration in Johnson. However, those who braved the heat experienced live music, workshops and a cannabis-themed marketplace.

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