Amy Kolb Noyes

Public Post Reporter

Amy is an award winning journalist who has worked in print and radio in Vermont since 1991. She has been a VPR contributor since 2006, primarily covering the Lamoille Valley. Amy has a B.S in Broadcast Journalism from Syracuse University. She is author of Nontoxic Housecleaning, published as part of the Chelsea Green Guide series, and Living the Green Up Way, an activity and storybook published by Green Up Vermont.

Public Post

Amy is VPR's Public Post reporter, reporting stories and trends from Vermont cities and towns that are interesting and relevant to the entire state. Amy uses the Public Post app to monitor documents from Vermont's city and town websites and track news coming from local government. If you've got a story idea or news tip email Amy or reach out to her on Twitter.

Ways to Connect

More than a dozen women from around Vermont met in Morristown on Tuesday at a barn that has been converted to a retreat space. They were there to learn about starting and running a cannabis-related business in Vermont.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

They’ve been called Mary Janes, Puffragettes and the Women of Weed. Whatever you choose, women are making their mark on the rapidly growing cannabis industry — and Vermont women are no exception.

National Weather Service, Burlington Twitter

A heat advisory, thunderstorm warning and power outages throughout the state. We're kicking off the week with wild weather. Here are the details.

A section where boaters can launch onto Berlin Pond from Mirror Lake Road, in Berlin, with a red hydrant and a guardrail.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

It’s been six years since a Vermont Supreme Court ruling opened Berlin Pond up for fishing. Until that time, recreational uses of the pond were banned because it’s a water source for Montpelier.

Now the Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife wants to hear from the people who fish there.

Artist Lois Eby, farmer Greg Cox and Supreme Court Associate Justice Marilyn Skoglund.
Amy Noyes/Nina Keck/Angela Evancie / VPR

For the free-thinkers and radicals who moved to Vermont in the 1960s and 1970s, the past may be obscured in a cloud of … wood … smoke. But what does the present look like?

Thea Alvin holds a photo of her old barn, framed behind a gothic arch she built. The barn burned down in December, but the arch still stands. A community member stopped by and gave her the photo last week.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

It was a tough winter for Thea Alvin.

On Dec. 18, 2017, life changed overnight for her and her partner Michael Clookey.

Exterior of Wolcott Elementary School on an overcast day.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

A nearly 200-page report was released by the Vermont Agency of Education on Friday, and school districts around Vermont are going through the state's school consolidation recommendations.

A groundbreaking ceremony was held at One Taylor Street, in Montpelier on Tuesday, May 29.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Construction will soon be underway on a multimodal transit and welcome center in Montpelier. It’s known as the One Taylor Street project — and it’s been a long time coming.

There's still plenty of mud, and even some snow and ice, left on Vermont's hiking trails. The Green Mountain Club asks that hikers head into the woods prepared.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

It's officially hiking season, but that doesn’t mean Vermont’s wooded trails are clear of all traces of winter.

Green Mountain Club Field Supervisor Ilana Copel and Membership & Communications Coordinator Kristin McLane stand on the new Long Trail boardwalk, along a beaver pond.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

The Friday before Memorial Day marks the traditional start of the hiking season in Vermont. This year, it's also the opening of a newly relocated section of the Long Trail that includes a wheelchair and stroller accessible boardwalk.

Old Stone House Museum Director Molly Veysey and Deputy Director Walter Parenteau stand in front of the Orleans County Historical Society building and under the sign.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Next week the Old Stone House Museum, in Brownington, opens for the season. And the Orleans County Historical Society’s museum has a pair of new leaders with some big ideas for the popular school field trip destination.

This week the College of St. Joseph board of trustees voted to keep the school open, outlining several strategies to bring in additional revenue.
Nina Keck / VPR

The College of St. Joseph, in Rutland, will not be closing its doors.

In April, the college announced it was considering folding due to financial troubles. But the board of trustees voted on Monday to keep the school open, outlining several strategies to increase revenue. 

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

All sorts of handy people spent a recent Saturday in Hardwick volunteering to fix other peoples' broken stuff, and passing on a little of their know-how.

A wall display at Northfield Elementary School featured the covers of all this year's nominees for the Dorothy Canfield Fisher Book Award.
Meg Malone / VPR

Dorothy’s List readers have cast their ballots and the results have been tallied. The winner of this year’s Dorothy Canfield Fisher Book Award is the World War II novel Projekt 1065 by Alan Gratz!

Eight students sit in a library holding up copies of Firoozeh's Dumas' novel "It Ain't So Awful, Falafel."
Meg Malone / VPR

At the Orchard Elementary School in South Burlington, students come from a variety of cultural backgrounds. In fact, about a third of the students speak a language other than English at home. 

Last fall, a group of Orchard fifth-graders gathered to discuss It Ain’t So Awful, Falafel, a novel about an Iranian-born girl living in California in the late 1970s and early 1980s – much like author Firoozeh Dumas.

SoundCheck members pose onstage at Peoples Academy. Back row (L-R): Brian Boyes, Elizabeth Autorino, Ruby Klarich, Liam Mears, Wilson Knight, Paige Thibault, Bruno John. Front row (L-R): Cameron Mueller-Harder, Grace Carlomango, Logan "Loganic" Wedge.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

There’s been an upswing of student activism in 2018, from Black Lives Matter flags flying at schools to school walkouts against gun violence. Now there’s a group of Vermont students providing a soundtrack for those actions.

Sen. Bernie Sanders at an event in Jackson, Mississippi, April 4, 2018. All three members of the delegation have commented on President Trumps airstrikes Friday on Syrian targets.
Rogelio V. Solis / AP

Vermont's Congressional delegation is speaking out against they way President Donald Trump ordered U.S. airstrikes on Syrian targets.

Claudia Marshall holds a bundle of 'Giving Garden' seed packets from High Mowing Organic Seeds, at the Gardener's Supply store in Burlington.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Two Vermont companies have joined forces to encourage gardeners across the country to help fill their local food shelves.

The exterior of the Johnson Municipal Building.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Bucking the trend of low voter turnout, the village of Johnson’s annual meeting had to be recessed last week because the number of people in attendance exceeded the meeting room’s capacity.

Amy Noyes / VPR

History was made at a crowded bar in Morrisville Sunday afternoon, as a Democratic challenger to Governor Phil Scott kicked off her campaign.

Between two historic monitor barns in Richmond lies a working farm run by the Vermont Youth Conservation Corps. The farm is home to the Health Care Share, a CSA that's free to Vermonters experiencing food insecurity and diet-related illness.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

This time of year, many Vermonters are thinking about signing up for a CSA share at their local farm. Meanwhile, the Vermont Youth Conservation Corps is getting ready to supply a different type of Community Supported Agriculture – one you pick up at a doctor's office.

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