Amy Kolb Noyes

Public Post Reporter

Amy is an award winning journalist who has worked in print and radio in Vermont since 1991. She has been a VPR contributor since 2006, primarily covering the Lamoille Valley. Amy has a B.S in Broadcast Journalism from Syracuse University. She is author of Nontoxic Housecleaning, published as part of the Chelsea Green Guide series, and Living the Green Up Way, an activity and storybook published by Green Up Vermont.

Public Post

Amy is VPR's Public Post reporter, reporting stories and trends from Vermont cities and towns that are interesting and relevant to the entire state. Amy uses the Public Post app to monitor documents from Vermont's city and town websites and track news coming from local government. If you've got a story idea or news tip email Amy or reach out to her on Twitter.

Ways to Connect

Sen. Bernie Sanders at an event in Jackson, Mississippi, April 4, 2018. All three members of the delegation have commented on President Trumps airstrikes Friday on Syrian targets.
Rogelio V. Solis / AP

Vermont's Congressional delegation is speaking out against they way President Donald Trump ordered U.S. airstrikes on Syrian targets.

Claudia Marshall holds a bundle of 'Giving Garden' seed packets from High Mowing Organic Seeds, at the Gardener's Supply store in Burlington.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Two Vermont companies have joined forces to encourage gardeners across the country to help fill their local food shelves.

The exterior of the Johnson Municipal Building.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Bucking the trend of low voter turnout, the village of Johnson’s annual meeting had to be recessed last week because the number of people in attendance exceeded the meeting room’s capacity.

Amy Noyes / VPR

History was made at a crowded bar in Morrisville Sunday afternoon, as a Democratic challenger to Governor Phil Scott kicked off her campaign.

Between two historic monitor barns in Richmond lies a working farm run by the Vermont Youth Conservation Corps. The farm is home to the Health Care Share, a CSA that's free to Vermonters experiencing food insecurity and diet-related illness.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

This time of year, many Vermonters are thinking about signing up for a CSA share at their local farm. Meanwhile, the Vermont Youth Conservation Corps is getting ready to supply a different type of Community Supported Agriculture – one you pick up at a doctor's office.

Rebecca Harvey, a scientist with Vermont's Acid Lakes Monitoring Program, caps a water sample taken by a solar-powered automatic sampler at an outlet flowing from Hardwood Pond, in Elmore.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Vermont's water quality issues can seem like an insurmountable problem, but state scientists have a treasure-trove of acid rain data that could prove useful in tackling those concerns.

Four Westford Elementary students gather around a table in the library.
Meg Malone / VPR

Westford Elementary School students have broken up into small groups, clustered around library tables — but in this case, the tables are figurative life rafts. The students are discovering a nearly-forgotten piece of history, as they dive into the nonfiction book Lost in the Pacific, 1942 by Vermont author Tod Olson.

Cans of Heady Topper roll off the production line at The Alchemist brewery, in Waterbury. The brewery recently intentionally over-built a solar project and is sharing its extra power with the Waterbury Area Senior Center.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

"Microbrews and bluebird skies." It could almost be a Vermont tourism campaign — but in this instance, it describes an emerging trend in the region: solar-powered local beer production. And one central Vermont brewery's raising the bar even higher by throwing philanthropy into the mix.

Zeb Towne, of Duxbury, is reportedly the only elected dogcatcher in the United States. Last week he was reelected without opposition.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

It’s a political insult that dates back to the 1800s and has been used as recently as last fall by the President: "He couldn’t get elected dogcatcher." Often considered hyperbole, since there are no longer elected dogcatchers in the U.S., there's a town in central Vermont where it could be taken quite literally.

Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

Students across the country and around Vermont are planning school walkouts and other protest actions Wednesday morning, March 14.

Town meeting 2018 in Calais
John Dillon / VPR

At town meetings around Vermont, 35 communities adopted a renewable energy resolution that originated with the climate action group 350 Vermont.

Central Vermont Internet founder Jeremy Hansen answers questions about the proposal at town meeting in Berlin, where he also sits on the select board.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

With at least 12 towns voting in favor of forming a communications district so far, Central Vermont Internet will go forward. The idea is to bring publicly-run high-speed internet to those towns.

Downtown Barre City's North Main Street.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Voters in Barre City will consider a 1 percent local option tax on Town Meeting Day — and it’s not the first time they’ve been asked to adopt the tax.

Elizabeth Atherton and Sally O’Brien work on placing their photos, taken in front of a green screen, into pictures of places from medieval France.
Aym Kolb Noyes / VPR

Readers at the Neshobe School in Brandon are really getting into Adam Gidwitz’s book The Inquisitor’s Tale, which takes place in the Middle Ages — meaning that with the help of imagination and technology, they are literally putting themselves into the narrative.

Hartford won't be voting on designing a track for its high school this town meeting, despite a petition signed by more than enough voters. That has one petitioner taking the matter to court.
photoncatcher / iStock

At least a generation of runners has gone through the track program at Hartford High School since the community first started talking about building an official track. But despite a petition signed by hundreds of voters, there will be no track talk on the town meeting ballot this year.

Hannah Dreissigacker introduces a group of young skiers to the Craftsbury Outdoor Center's shooting range.
courtesy Judy Geer

The Craftsbury Outdoor Center, in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom, has trained six athletes competing in the Pyeongchang Olympics. That’s about half the winter athletes on the Center’s Green Racing Project team.

Johnson Select Board Members Doug Molde (left) and Nat Kinney look at a map of the Lamoille River in Johnson. The board voted to hire heavy equipment to clear ice jams out of the river to prevent what they believe to be imminent flooding in the village.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

With warmer weather and rain in the forecast early next week, the Johnson Select Board has decided to take proactive measures to prevent flooding.

Stock image of fiber-optic cables.
kynny / iStock

At Town Meeting in March, 13 central Vermont communities will consider forming a communications union district, the sole purpose of which would be to bring fiber-optic internet service to the area.

Ian Noyes / For VPR

Montpelier High School is flying a Black Lives Matter flag this month to mark Black History Month and that action has triggered some strong reactions. School administrators say the feedback, both positive and negative, has strengthened their resolve.

Jaiel Pulskamp gets a cup of coffee at the Post Office Cafe, in Worcester. In addition to working on her farm, she's a field organizer for 350 Vermont's Generate New Solutions Campaign to bring renewable energy discussions to town meetings across Vermont.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

On Town Meeting Day, about 40 towns around Vermont will consider a nonbinding resolution to reduce Vermonters' dependence on fossil fuels. It's part of an effort by the climate justice group 350 Vermont to send a message to state lawmakers.

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