Amy Kolb Noyes

Public Post Reporter

Amy is an award winning journalist who has worked in print and radio in Vermont since 1991. She has been a VPR contributor since 2006, primarily covering the Lamoille Valley. Amy has a B.S in Broadcast Journalism from Syracuse University. She is author of Nontoxic Housecleaning, published as part of the Chelsea Green Guide series, and Living the Green Up Way, an activity and storybook published by Green Up Vermont.

Public Post

Amy is VPR's Public Post reporter, reporting stories and trends from Vermont cities and towns that are interesting and relevant to the entire state. Amy uses the Public Post app to monitor documents from Vermont's city and town websites and track news coming from local government. If you've got a story idea or news tip email Amy or reach out to her on Twitter.

Ways to Connect

Town meeting 2018 in Calais
John Dillon / VPR

At town meetings around Vermont, 35 communities adopted a renewable energy resolution that originated with the climate action group 350 Vermont.

Central Vermont Internet founder Jeremy Hansen answers questions about the proposal at town meeting in Berlin, where he also sits on the select board.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

With at least 12 towns voting in favor of forming a communications district so far, Central Vermont Internet will go forward. The idea is to bring publicly-run high-speed internet to those towns.

Downtown Barre City's North Main Street.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Voters in Barre City will consider a 1 percent local option tax on Town Meeting Day — and it’s not the first time they’ve been asked to adopt the tax.

Elizabeth Atherton and Sally O’Brien work on placing their photos, taken in front of a green screen, into pictures of places from medieval France.
Aym Kolb Noyes / VPR

Readers at the Neshobe School in Brandon are really getting into Adam Gidwitz’s book The Inquisitor’s Tale, which takes place in the Middle Ages — meaning that with the help of imagination and technology, they are literally putting themselves into the narrative.

Hartford won't be voting on designing a track for its high school this town meeting, despite a petition signed by more than enough voters. That has one petitioner taking the matter to court.
photoncatcher / iStock

At least a generation of runners has gone through the track program at Hartford High School since the community first started talking about building an official track. But despite a petition signed by hundreds of voters, there will be no track talk on the town meeting ballot this year.

Hannah Dreissigacker introduces a group of young skiers to the Craftsbury Outdoor Center's shooting range.
courtesy Judy Geer

The Craftsbury Outdoor Center, in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom, has trained six athletes competing in the Pyeongchang Olympics. That’s about half the winter athletes on the Center’s Green Racing Project team.

Johnson Select Board Members Doug Molde (left) and Nat Kinney look at a map of the Lamoille River in Johnson. The board voted to hire heavy equipment to clear ice jams out of the river to prevent what they believe to be imminent flooding in the village.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

With warmer weather and rain in the forecast early next week, the Johnson Select Board has decided to take proactive measures to prevent flooding.

Stock image of fiber-optic cables.
kynny / iStock

At Town Meeting in March, 13 central Vermont communities will consider forming a communications union district, the sole purpose of which would be to bring fiber-optic internet service to the area.

Ian Noyes / For VPR

Montpelier High School is flying a Black Lives Matter flag this month to mark Black History Month and that action has triggered some strong reactions. School administrators say the feedback, both positive and negative, has strengthened their resolve.

Jaiel Pulskamp gets a cup of coffee at the Post Office Cafe, in Worcester. In addition to working on her farm, she's a field organizer for 350 Vermont's Generate New Solutions Campaign to bring renewable energy discussions to town meetings across Vermont.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

On Town Meeting Day, about 40 towns around Vermont will consider a nonbinding resolution to reduce Vermonters' dependence on fossil fuels. It's part of an effort by the climate justice group 350 Vermont to send a message to state lawmakers.

Students at Dover Elementary School gathered in the library to discuss Kelly Barnhill's novel "The Girl Who Drank the Moon" and posed with the paper birds they made.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Students at Dover Elementary are trying their hands at making origami birds. Paper birds like these play an interesting role in Kelly Barnhill’s fantastical novel The Girl Who Drank the Moon. The birds in the book are magical, and they can be both helpful and vicious.

From left, Carl Powden of the Vermont Land Trust, Kate Sudhoff of the Vermont Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation, and Bonnie and Don Bullard stand before a backdrop of Bean Mountain - part of the Bullard Lumber property in Eden.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

A lumber company’s property next to Green River Reservoir State Park is one of the latest parcels conserved through the Forest Legacy Program. This means the Lamoille County property will be protected for perpetuity and public access is guaranteed.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Over a thousand demonstrators took over the streets of downtown Montpelier Saturday afternoon as they marched from City Hall to the Statehouse. Organizers are calling it the March for Our Future.

A Craftsbury Outdoor Center rowing coach instructs a camper on Great Hosmer Pond from a motorized coaching launch.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

The Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation is abandoning a rulemaking effort for Great Hosmer Pond. Instead, the department is examining new ideas for managing competing uses on all of Vermont’s lakes and ponds.

After a wild temperature swing, along with rain and snow, downtown Johnson flooded on Saturday.
Courtesy Dan Noyes

Residents around the region are recovering after ice jams clogged some rivers and caused flooding over the weekend. The ice jams resulted from a wild temperature swing and mix of rain and snow.

Black River High School Middle School with a snowy lawn and a sign out front that says Our School, Our Community.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Black River High School students, from Ludlow and Mount Holly, have been studying together at Black River since middle school. But unless a vote held in November is reversed, their school could be closing before some of these students graduate.

For the last 60 Tuesdays, demonstrators have turned out in front of the Johnson village green to hold signs promoting activism and various progressive causes. Shown here are (l to r) Rick Aupperlee, Jackie Stanton, Diane Lehouiller and Calvin Stanton.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

For the 60 weeks since Donald Trump was elected President, demonstrators have spent Tuesday evenings standing with signs in front of Johnson’s village green, even braving recent sub-zero temperatures to uphold the streak.

From top left, clockwise: "Love" signs on a pole in Plainfield; stairs leading down to Lake Willoughby's clothing-optional Southwest Cove; Bill Gottesman shows how to use a printed sundial; a peak at Stowe Mountain Resort, which Vail purchased this year.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Public Post, VPR's local reporting project, looks at the people and events making news in towns and cities across the state. We've rounded up a few memorable stories from the past year that still stick out as we wrap up 2017.

The Cabot School Board unanimously approved filing an Alternative Governance Structure proposal with the Vermont Agency of Education to maintain its pre-K through 12 school.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

School Directors in Cabot are asking the state to approve a plan that would keep the town’s high school open and market the school to out-of-state students.

These Hyde Park fifth graders took a bus ride to the Green Mountain Technology and Career Center to talk about The Littlest Bigfoot with a group of sixth graders. The sixth grade is at GMTCC while Hyde Park Elementary School is undergoing renovations.
Meg Malone / VPR

If you were listening closely a few weeks ago in northern Vermont, you may have heard what sounded like a secret colony of "Bigfoots." But no, it was just a group of Hyde Park Elementary School students acting like the characters in The Littlest Bigfoot.

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