Amy Kolb Noyes

Public Post Reporter

Amy is an award winning journalist who has worked in print and radio in Vermont since 1991. She has been a VPR contributor since 2006, primarily covering the Lamoille Valley. Amy has a B.S in Broadcast Journalism from Syracuse University. She is author of Nontoxic Housecleaning, published as part of the Chelsea Green Guide series, and Living the Green Up Way, an activity and storybook published by Green Up Vermont.

Public Post

Amy is VPR's Public Post reporter, reporting stories and trends from Vermont cities and towns that are interesting and relevant to the entire state. Amy uses the Public Post app to monitor documents from Vermont's city and town websites and track news coming from local government. If you've got a story idea or news tip email Amy or reach out to her on Twitter.

Ways to Connect

For The Dogs

Jun 7, 2013
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Several communities around Vermont are considering creating a designated public space for dogs to play untethered. Meeting minutes in Wallingford, Hinesburg, Arlington, and Windsor have all revealed interest in creating a town dog park.

The first of three public informational meetings is being held in Waterbury this week, in advance of a $5 million bond vote to build a new municipal complex on land that currently belongs to the state.

The state has agreed to sell the town two buildings and a parcel of land in the Waterbury State Office Complex for $300,000. Much of the office complex remains unused since it flooded during Tropical Storm Irene. The Purchase and Sale Agreement was signed last week.

VPR / Charlotte Albright

A massive effort to restore power after yesterday’s damaging storms has continued throughout the day and is expected to last through Monday night and into Tuesday.

More than 500 Green Mountain Power employees and contractors are working to restore service as quickly as possible – repairing lines, removing trees and answering phones.

Green Mountain Power still has over 2,000 customers without power in towns such as St. Johnsbury, Danville and Marshfield. At one point over 20,000 customers were in the dark.

The Agency of Transportation has closed one southbound lane of Interstate 89 in Colchester due to a sinkhole. 

The left-hand lane is closed about half-way between exits 17 and 16, just north of the Blakey Road overpass. 

With several highway construction projects underway, the Vermont State Police is reminding motorists to merge early and to drive slowly through all construction zones.

This is the second sinkhole to open in I-89 this spring. In April, a sinkhole briefly closed a lane in Bolton.

Colchester voters go to the polls this week to consider a bond vote that, if all goes as planned, shouldn't cost the taxpayers anything. The $500,000 bond would pay to replace a failing wastewater system at the Windemere Estates Mobile Home Park, located on Johnson Avenue between St. Michael's College and Camp Johnson. The loan would be repaid by the property owner, The Housing Foundation, Inc. (HFI).

VPR’s Public Post pores through municipal public documents, posted online, to bring you local news from Vermont’s cities, towns, villages and gores. When we find something interesting or otherwise newsworthy, we send out a tweet. We follow up on the bigger stories at the VPR News Blog. Here are some tweet highlights from the past week:

This morning we begin a new series of conversations about the local news found in VPR’s online Public Post. That’s where you’ll find meeting minutes and community news items that hold big consequences for Vermont towns.

This week, we turn our attention to the flooding Vermont experienced in May and a new trend among towns trying to be transparent under Vermont’s public records law. VPR’s Amy Noyes manages Public Post and she speaks with Peter Biello.
 

Several northern Vermont towns experienced heavy rains, flash flooding, and washed-out roads over the long Memorial Day weekend. Many of those towns turned to their municipal websites as a way to get emergency information out to residents. Even after the flooding, towns are using their home pages to provide updates on road repairs and encourage residents to report damage for the federal assessment that will determine eligibility for federal emergency assistance.

Escaped Cows On I-89

May 28, 2013

Early morning motorists may have come across some unexpected obstacles on Route 89 North, near exit 16.

Several cows escaped from a farm on Mallets Bay Road, near the Colchester-Winooski border. The cows made their way to the interstate shortly after 3 o’clock this morning.

About an hour later State Police reported all bovines had been removed from the interstate. And all cows are now safely back on the farm.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

The Northeast Kingdom town of Greensboro is home to a number of unique and successful ventures – from Circus Smirkus to the cheese cellars at Jasper Hill.  And now it’s home to what a popular beer rating website has named the single best brewer in the world: Hill Farmstead Brewery. Despite being located far off the beaten path, crowds are flocking to Greensboro to get a taste of what Hill Farmstead has to offer.

VPR’s Public Post pores through municipal public documents, posted online, to bring you local news from Vermont’s cities, towns, villages and gores. When we find something interesting or otherwise newsworthy, we send out a tweet. We follow up on the bigger stories at the VPR News Blog. Here are some tweet highlights from the past week:

Monday afternoon the Vermont Emergency Operations Center reported that all State roads that had been closed due to rain, flooding, and snow over the past few days are now open, with the exception of Maidstone Highway. However, a number of local roads remained closed. Motorists are asked to respect detours until roads are deemed passable.

US Rt 5 in Derby Line has been closed just north of Caswell Avenue due to a hole discovered in the pavement just over the Canadian border. The hole in pavement is small, however a large area beneath the pavement has eroded away.

The Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation has a plan for taking care of the White River and its tributaries, and it is now asking for public input before finalizing and implementing it.

Reduce, reuse, recycle. The Town of Jay has put that motto to work in re-purposing its former town garage. The Jay Planning Commission and Zoning Board recently issued a change of use permit to house the Troy/Jay Recycle Center in the fourth bay of the Cross Road building that formerly served as the town garage.

There is no longer a food shelf in the Weathersfield village of Perkinsville, or anywhere else in Weathersfield. That has created a hardship – not just for residents who are food insecure, but also for at least one food shelf in a neighboring community. The Reading-West Windsor Food Shelf has been serving approximately 20 Weathersfield families since the food shelf at the Perkinsville Community Church closed its doors.

Is it necessary or beneficial to have both a Regional Planning Commission and a separate Economic Development  Corporation serving the same population? In Central Vermont, a committee considering that question has decided the answer is no.  A "joint committee on consolidation of the Central Vermont Regional Planning Commission and the Central Vermont Economic Development Corporation" is recommending merging the two organizations into a Central Vermont Regional Commission.

VPR’s Public Post pores through municipal public documents, posted online, to bring you local news from Vermont’s cities, towns, villages and gores. When we find something interesting or otherwise newsworthy, we send out a tweet. We follow up on the bigger stories at the VPR News Blog. Here are some tweet highlights from the past week:

After a winter's worth of wear and tear, bridges can take a beating in Vermont. This time of year cities and towns, as well as the state, take stock of how the bridges are holding up. The bridges that raise the most concern tend to fall into two categories: the oldest and the busiest. When a bridge fits under both those headings, the problems can be far more complicated.

The Montpelier City Council recently put together a list of goals to focus on over the next year. Among them is "to become a nationally known bike and pedestrian friendly city."

VPR’s Public Post pores through municipal public documents, posted online, to bring you local news from Vermont’s cities, towns, villages and gores. When we find something interesting or otherwise newsworthy, we send out a tweet. We follow up on the bigger stories at the VPR News Blog. Here are some tweet highlights from the past week:

Pages