Amy Kolb Noyes

Public Post Reporter

Amy is an award winning journalist who has worked in print and radio in Vermont since 1991. She has been a VPR contributor since 2006, primarily covering the Lamoille Valley. Amy has a B.S in Broadcast Journalism from Syracuse University. She is author of Nontoxic Housecleaning, published as part of the Chelsea Green Guide series, and Living the Green Up Way, an activity and storybook published by Green Up Vermont.

Public Post

Amy is VPR's Public Post reporter, reporting stories and trends from Vermont cities and towns that are interesting and relevant to the entire state. Amy uses the Public Post app to monitor documents from Vermont's city and town websites and track news coming from local government. If you've got a story idea or news tip email Amy or reach out to her on Twitter.

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Rockingham Health Officer Ellen Howard is asking residents to be sure their pets' rabies vaccines are up-to-date. While there have not been any confirmed cases of rabies in Rockingham so far this year, Howard reported, "the Rockingham Highway Department has recently dealt with four instances of very ill, disoriented animals."

Andy Roberts Photos

Ludlow's West Hill Recreation Area has a problem. In fact, one might say the town recreation committee is on a wild goose chase. It's searching for ways to get a gaggle of unwelcome geese to leave the recreation area and find another home.

The city of Burlington adopted its first Climate Action Plan 13 years ago. Since that time, the city has set goals, as outlined on the city's website, to reduce its carbon emissions to a 20 percent reduction of 2007 levels by 2020 and an 80 percent reduction by 2050.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

A grand opening celebration following a library renovation project doesn’t always attract a lot of attention. But when that library is one of only four built in Vermont, over a century ago, by Andrew Carnegie… and it happens to be in the House Speaker’s hometown, dignitaries take note.

Work on the Morristown Centennial Library started three years ago with a groundbreaking ceremony attended by then-Governor Jim Douglas. Today Governor Peter Shumlin greeted a full house in the newly expanded library. He said the expansion ensures the historic library will serve generations to come.

VPR’s Public Post pores through municipal public documents, posted online, to bring you local news from Vermont’s cities, towns, villages and gores. When we find something interesting or otherwise newsworthy, we send out a tweet. We follow up on the bigger stories at the VPR News Blog. Here are some tweet highlights from the past week:

The annual town reports came out late this year in Lincoln - only three days before Town Meeting Day. As it turns out, that has caused  lot of hassle.

At first, town officials feared the problem meant the annual town meeting had not been properly warned, putting the town out of compliance with Vermont's open meeting law. But after consultation with the secretary of state's office, town officials were assured town meeting could go ahead as planned, so long as Lincoln held a separately warned "validation meeting" where voters would ratify Town Meeting Day results.

Northfield Farmers Market

Seasonal farmers markets will soon begin sprouting up around Vermont. Among them will be the Northfield Farmers Market, which has been held Tuesday afternoons at the Northfield Village Common since 2007. But this year the Northfield Village Common will also be home to a second farmers market, held on Monday afternoons. The new market will be called Friendly Farms Market, but the relationship between market organizers is far from cordial.

Judging by the forecast, Wednesday is going to be warm and sunny across Vermont – a delightful day to be outside. And that's a good thing, because  it happens to be Vermont Intergenerational Walk and Roll to School Day. This is the second year Vermont Safe Routes to School has sponsored Walk and Roll to School Day.

The first day students returned to Montpelier's Union Elementary School after their spring vacation on Monday also turned out to be the first day construction crews began work on School Street on the city's new district heating project.

City officials knew this would cause some traffic headaches, especially during school drop-off and pick-up times. But they say the situation couldn't be helped if the city's district heat project is to be kept on track.

VPR’s Public Post pores through municipal public documents, posted online, to bring you local news from Vermont’s cities, towns, villages and gores. When we find something interesting or otherwise newsworthy, we send out a tweet. We follow up on the bigger stories at the VPR News Blog. Here are some tweet highlights from the past week:

Around 90 people came out to the Folsom School and Community Center last week for a special meeting of the South Hero Select Board. They were there to discuss the idea of enacting interim zoning measures to limit the size of commercial, industrial, and professional service buildings in town.

VTrans

Last week the Vermont Transportation Board officially expanded the Scenic Route 100 Byway to encompass 138 miles through 20 towns in central and southern Vermont. To be clear, Route 100 hasn't changed, just the "byway" designation has been expanded to new portions of the road. So, why are so many towns and businesses along the route so excited? It's all about marketing.

Voters in Vergennes are being asked to consider a scaled-down version of the new police department that was defeated on Town Meeting Day. Last month city voters defeated the $1.85 million project by just ten votes. The final tally, which was confirmed by a recount, was 292 yes to 302 no.

It's a story that's repeated across the Vermont landscape: historic barns - once treasures in their communities - falling into a near-terminal state of disrepair. Fortunately, thanks to motivated citizens who step forward to help, the story sometimes has a happy ending. That's the storyline a community group in Williston is hoping to write for the Brennan Barn.

VPR’s Public Post pores through municipal public documents, posted online, to bring you local news from Vermont’s cities, towns, villages and gores. When we find something interesting or otherwise newsworthy, we send out a tweet. We follow up on the bigger stories at the VPR News Blog. Here are some tweet highlights from the past week:

VPR’s Public Post pores through municipal public documents, posted online, to bring you local news from Vermont’s cities, towns, villages and gores. When we find something interesting or otherwise newsworthy, we send out a tweet. We follow up on the bigger stories at the VPR News Blog. Here are some tweet highlights from the past week:

As construction season gets under way, work is set to begin on the first phase of the Lamoille Valley Rail Trail.

When complete, the trail will stretch across the breadth of Vermont, between St. Johnsbury and Swanton.

But project organizers fear they won't have the money to get very far.

The last train to run on the Lamoille Valley Railroad clattered to a halt in 1994. For the past two decades, nature has been slowly reclaiming the 96-mile corridor.

By keeping the birds in mind when planning haying, brush-hogging, and property development, landowners can help protect Vermont’s grassland bird species that are suffering from dwindling habitat. That’s the message the Charlotte Conservation Commission is trying to spread via a brochure entitled Grassland Birds in Charlotte: Our Role in Their Future.

Waitsfield has a plan to address issues with failing septic systems in town, but first it needs to dabble in a little archaeology. The first phase of the town’s “decentralized wastewater project” calls for a 1,500-gallons-per-day dispersal field in a lot next to the Waitsfield United Church of Christ, and about 60 meters off the banks of the Mad River. However, authorities have determined that there’s a good chance that a field near the river could have some important archaeological artifacts.

Voters in Ludlow are being called to the polls for a special town meeting vote Tuesday, May 7, to consider two spending items. The first question on the ballot seeks a $180,000 bond to finance the balance of a new fire truck.

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