Angela Evancie

Managing Editor for Podcasts

Angela Evancie is VPR's managing editor for podcasts and the host of VPR's people-powered journalism podcast, Brave Little State.

Angela joined VPR's news team in 2013 as as a digital producer; she became the station's first digital editor for news in 2015. Her work on the team helped earn VPR numerous national awards, including a 2016 national Edward R. Murrow Excellence in Video award for a Lego explanation of how the Iowa caucus works, a 2015 Associated Press Media Editors (APME) Community Engagement award for VPR's Traces Project and a 2014 Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) award for VPR's multimedia campaign coverage. In 2015, her story about the difficulty of determining what's local at Trader Joe's was awarded a regional Edward R. Murrow award in the writing category.

In 2016, Angela and former VPR All Things Considered host Alex Keefe launched Brave Little State, a podcast about curiosity and Vermont that aims to make journalism more inclusive, more transparent and more fun. The fifth episode of the show, about Vermont's Abenaki Native Americans, earned a national Edward R. Murrow award for news documentary. 

Angela has contributed work to NPR, This American Life and The Atlantic, among other outlets. She launched her journalism career with a 2010 Compton Mentor Fellowship and a 2011 Middlebury Fellowship in Environmental Journalism. 

Angela attended Middlebury College and holds a master of arts degree from the Middlebury Bread Loaf School of English. A native of Addison County, she now lives in the Upper Valley.

Ways to Connect

Angela Evancie / VPR

The 272-mile Long Trail follows Green Mountain ridgelines from one end of Vermont to another. So what’s it like to hike the whole thing?

Logo for JOLTED, a five-part podcast about a school shooting that didn't happen, the line between thought and crime, and a Republican governor in a rural state who changed his mind about gun laws.
Aaron Shrewsbury for VPR

This month on Brave Little State, we interrupt our regular question-asking to bring you the first installment of JOLTED, a new five-part podcast from the VPR newsroom.

Angela Evancie / VPR

Want to have a say in the question that Brave Little State explores for our October episode? Now's your chance to vote!

Angela Evancie / VPR

You know the feeling. You’re driving along, somewhere in Vermont, and you turn onto a road with an intriguing name. And you wonder where it came from.

Angela Evancie / VPR

This month’s question led Brave Little State straight into an unfolding story — about an outsider with deep pockets and big ideas, and the towns that banded together to reject those ideas. 

David Hall.
Steve Zind / VPR file

A developer from Utah has abandoned his plans to build a futuristic utopia in the hills of central Vermont.

Angela Evancie / VPR

“Where are all the aging hippies that moved to Vermont during the '60s and '70s, and what are they doing now?”

Artist Lois Eby, farmer Greg Cox and Supreme Court Associate Justice Marilyn Skoglund.
Amy Noyes/Nina Keck/Angela Evancie / VPR

For the free-thinkers and radicals who moved to Vermont in the 1960s and 1970s, the past may be obscured in a cloud of … wood … smoke. But what does the present look like?

A photo collage featuring, from left, the exterior of a prison, a close-up of a tick, and a Vermont landscape.
From left: Peter Hirschfeld/VPR; ErikKarits/iStockphoto.com; Angela Evancie/VPR

Want to have a say in the question that Brave Little State explores for our August episode? Now's your chance to vote!

Looking over the Winooski River to a building on a cloudy day.
Angela Evancie / VPR

For a time, Chittenden County had a bustling French Canadian population. There was even a "Little Canada" in Winooski. And you can still find it today, if you know where to look.

Verandah Porche, courtesy

Brave Little State is working on an episode about Vermont's "aging hippies" — if that’s you, we want to hear from you.

Men work in a granite processing facility.
Vermont Historical Society

There was a time when it was totally normal to hear French spoken in some of Vermont’s smallest towns and biggest cities.

frimages / iStockphoto.com

Since we started this show, there’s a question we’ve gotten a lot: Why are so many young people leaving the state?

Angela Evancie / VPR

Just how culturally different is the Northeast Kingdom from the rest of the state? Can it be quantified in any way, or is it largely legend?

Patrick Warn talks in an office to Lamoille County Sheriff Roger Marcoux.
Emily Corwin / VPR

If Vermont’s county sheriffs are accountable to their voters, but most of their voters don’t pay much attention to them, what happens when they do something wrong?

Aaron Shrewsbury for VPR

Not sure how the whole podcast thing works? We're here to help.

GeorgePeters / iStock.com

There’s a joke about the employment scene in Vermont: “What do you call a Vermonter with two jobs? Lazy.”

Brave Little State
Aaron Shrewsbury

Brave Little State is working on an episode about Vermonters who work multiple jobs — if that’s you, we want to hear from you.

An image of the Vermont state flag.
btgbtg / iStock.com

We aren't endorsing it, but ... if Vermont did manage to secede from the United States, how would we fare?

Brave Little State
Aaron Shrewsbury

When it comes to Vermont’s history with the Underground Railroad, where’s the line between myth and truth? And whose voices are missing from the story?

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