Bob Kinzel

Host, Reporter

Bob is a veteran Vermont journalist, specializing in political reporting. He is based in VPR’s Capital Bureau located across the street from Vermont’s Statehouse. Prior to joining VPR full time in 2002, Bob ran the Vermont News Service for 21 years. The service provided daily local news for eleven stations, including VPR. Bob started the News Service following a stint as news director for WNCS.

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President Donald Trump shakes hands with Brett Kavanaugh.
Alex Brandon / Associated Press

Both of Vermont's two U.S. senators are expressing very strong concerns about President Donald Trump's nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Boston Red Sox starting pitcher Rick Porcello throws during the first inning of a game against the Kansas City Royals on Sunday, July 8, 2018.
Charlie Riedel / AP

It's been an unpredictable baseball season so far this summer, with the Red Sox and Yankees battling for first place and new measures to speed up the pace of play. Vermont Edition's catches up with the the baseball season from the big leagues to up-and-coming college players with the Vermont Mountaineers.

Vermonters played an important role at Gettysburg during the Civil War.
Ron Zanzoni / Flickr

In the recent Legislative session, a resolution was passed to preserve Camp Letterman in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. We'll look at why this battlefield location was so important to Vermont soldiers and how it played a key role in the Civil War.

A stethoscope on top of medical paperwork.
megaflopp / iStock

Vermont health regulators are keeping a close watch on some new federal health care policies to make sure that Vermont consumers don't get ripped off by the plans.

The Vermont flag.
btgbtg / iStock.com

Early voting for the Aug. 14 Vermont primary election is underway.

Voters now have just over six weeks to cast a ballot in the major party contests for statewide and legislative races.

The Vermont Statehouse.
DenisTangneyJr. / iStock

With a state government shutdown narrowly avoided, Vermont Edition wraps up this week by talking with political reporters about the details of the budget agreement, what it means for future education and funding policies in our state, and how the Montpelier showdown could affect the 2018 campaign.

So far, more than 250 schools have applied for state grant money to improve their security infrastructure.
Kameleon007 / iStock

The dispute between Gov. Phil Scott and legislative leaders over property tax rates went on for weeks, and while the governor announced Monday he'll let the latest state budget pass without his signature, there are some who believe the fight was about much more than money and tax rates.

They think it's about who will control future education policies: local school boards or the state?

The House chamber of the Vermont Legislature
Angela Evancie / VPR/file

Lawmakers will be back at the Statehouse on Monday to try and find a budget settlement with Gov. Phil Scott. But that job got a lot harder after a bizarre set of events unfolded late Friday night in the House.

A protester outside the White House in Washington, D.C., Thursday. Members of the Vermont House voted Friday to oppose a decision by the Trump Administration to separate children from undocumented parents at the border.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

The Vermont House has given its tri-partisan approval to a resolution that strongly opposes a decision by the Trump Administration to separate undocumented parents from their children along the Mexican border.

A photograph of the first page of a Vermont State Police training bulletin.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Vermont's new marijuana law — allowing possession of a limited amount of the drug — goes into effect on July 1. The Vermont State Police has issued a training bulletin on how they plan to handle the new legislation, including some changes in how state troopers will deal with drivers.

Looking up at the golden dome of the Vermont Statehouse on a cloudy day.
Angela Evancie / VPR File

The Vermont Senate has given its unanimous approval to a new state budget for next year.

Senate leaders say the plan is a fair compromise that's designed to ensure that there isn't a government shutdown at the beginning of July.

Brenda Siegel is running for the Democratic nomination for governor.
courtesy of Brenda Siegel

Brenda Siegel of Newfane is one of the four candidates who will be on the ballot for the Democratic nomination for governor. She describes herself as a low-income single mother, and says the perspective of people like her is lacking in government right now. We're talking to her about her platform and why she’s running.

The statehouse in spring.
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

By June 30, Vermont needs a budget — otherwise there could be a government shutdown on the first day of the state's new fiscal year.

Here's what could be closed by a state government shutdown, and what still being done in Montpelier to avert a shutdown.
seyfettinozel / iStock

The current state budget funds Vermont till the end of the day June 30, and Montpelier has yet to work out a plan for next year. Here's what could happen if Vermont is forced to "shut down" July 1.

Tax Commissioner Kaj Samsom, center, said in an email to employees Monday that their "anxiety" and "stress" over the prospect of a government shutdown is unncessary.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR file

The disagreement between Gov. Phil Scott and legislative leaders over using one-time surplus money to stabilize property tax rates is now in its fourth week. And Gov. Scott has vetoed the latest budget from lawmakers. We're hearing from administration officials on their take on the standoff.

At his campaign launch in Barre in May, Democrat James Ehlers touted his policy agenda as the most progressive of the candidates seeking the governor's seat in 2018.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

James Ehlers is one of four Democrats running for governor. We're talking with the candidate about his platform and his priorities as we head toward the state's Aug. 14 primary. 

Gov. Phil Scott discusses the Administration's property tax plan with Budget and Finance Commissioner Adam Greshin at the Statehouse on Tuesday afternoon
Bob Kinzel / VPR

Gov. Phil Scott says he'll veto the newly passed state budget unless lawmakers agree not to increase the state's non-residential property tax rate.

Scott says he's giving legislative leaders until Thursday to find a solution that meets his requirements. But House Speaker Mitzi Johnson says she's not giving in to Scott's demands.

H. Brooke Paige
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

If you look at the list of statewide candidates in this year's election, there's something that will definitely catch your eye: H. Brooke Paige of Washington, Vermont is listed as a Republican candidate for six different state and federal offices.

The statehouse in spring.
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

With very little debate, the Vermont Senate Thursday afternoon gave its final approval to a state budget for next year. But Gov. Phil Scott has vowed to veto the bill.

Castleton University has faced layoffs, one of the moves made by the Vermont State Colleges System to combat falling enrollments.
Lisa Rathke / Associated Press

Colleges throughout Vermont and New England are facing falling enrollments and rising costs. We're talking about how Vermont state colleges are dealing with this challenging combination.

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