Bob Kinzel

Host, Reporter

Bob is a veteran Vermont journalist, specializing in political reporting. He is based in VPR’s Capital Bureau located across the street from Vermont’s Statehouse. Prior to joining VPR full time in 2002, Bob ran the Vermont News Service for 21 years. The service provided daily local news for eleven stations, including VPR. Bob started the News Service following a stint as news director for WNCS.

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Public Safety Commissioner Thomas Anderson speaks at a highway safety press conference in Waterbury on Tuesday afternoon. Following recent fatalities on Vermont roads, Anderson says there will be a greater presence of state and local police on roadways.
Bob Kinzel / VPR

Over a 48-hour period beginning this past weekend, eight people died in traffic accidents in various parts of the state. Vermont has rarely witnessed this many highway deaths in such a short period of time.

FILE - Rep. Pete Welch, D-Vt., speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Welch won both the Democratic and Republican nominations in August 2016 for re-election that year to a sixth term.
Lauren Victoria Burke / AP

Congressman Peter Welch has positioned himself as a Democrat who wants to work with Republicans. Polls suggest that's what Americans want from Washington, but so far bipartisanship has been hard to find in a polarized Congress.

Sen. Patrick Leahy is sponsoring a plan to prevent the Trump Administration from cracking down on states that allow medical marijuana.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

Sen. Patrick Leahy is leading an effort in the U.S. Senate to prevent the Trump Administration from cracking down on states that have legalized the use of medical marijuana.

All three members of Vermont's Congressional delegation support a bipartisan approach to strengthen the Affordable Care Act
Toby Talbot / Associated Press/File

Following the failure by Senate Republican leaders to repeal the Affordable Care Act last week, a group of 40 House members, including 20 Democrats and 20 Republicans, has emerged with a proposal to help strengthen the health care law.

All three members of Vermont's Congressional delegation say the president's transportation infrastructure plan is a giveaway to Wall Street investment firms.
tomazi / iStock

While all three members of Vermont's Congressional delegation support a $1 trillion plan to rebuild America's roads and bridges, they say President Trump's transportation proposal is a giveaway to Wall Street investment firms, and will send tolls skyrocketing.

Secretary of State Jim Condos says he doesn't trust the agenda of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity
Bob Kinzel / VPR file

Secretary of State Jim Condos says that for now he won't send any Vermont voter information to the Presidential Election Integrity Commission.

Brattleboro Memorial Hospital was the victim of a recent national cyber attack
Brattleboro Memorial Hospital / BMH

A program used by Brattleboro Memorial Hospital to allow doctors to dictate their notes by phone after they've seen a patient was the victim of a computer virus. It's one of three different methods that physicians at the hospital use to record this important information.

Boston Red Sox third baseman Tzu-Wei Lin swings at a pitch during the 8th inning of a baseball game against the Texas Rangers on Tuesday, July 4, 2017, in Arlington, Texas. We're talking about what's coming in the second half of the season.
Michael Ainsworth / Associated Press

The Red Sox started the baseball season sluggish, but now they're fired up. The Yankees meanwhile, got off to a great start but now they're floundering. On this episode of Vermont Edition, it's our annual summer baseball show!

Secretary of State Jim Condos says he doesn't trust the agenda of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity
Bob Kinzel / VPR file

Secretary of State Jim Condos says President Donald Trump's Election Integrity Commission is a "partisan witch hunt" that has the goal of suppressing voting rights in the U.S. And for the time being, Condos says he will not comply with the commission's request that he turn over Vermont's voter data base to the panel.

Gov. Phil Scott says he's troubled by President Trump's comments about the violence in Charlottesville last weekend
Bob Kinzel / VPR file

Vermont has a state budget for the new fiscal year that didn't raise any new taxes or fees, but some elected officials – including Gov. Phil Scott – are already thinking ahead to the financial impact that cuts at the federal level could bring to the state.

Hartland's Civil War soldiers are commemorated with this statue in the center of town.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Vermont Civil War historian Howard Coffin discusses some of his new research about the role that Vermonters played at the Battle of Gettysburg, a pivotal Union victory.

Montpelier City Clerk John Odum with one of the city's optical scan voting machines.
Bob Kinzel / VPR

Secretary of State Jim Condos says his office is actively taking steps to protect the state's election system from being manipulated by foreign or domestic computer hackers, but says there's no evidence so far to indicate that Vermont's voting system was breached.

Vermont's two U.S. senators, Patrick Leahy and Bernie Sanders both strongly oppose the new GOP Senate health care plan
crazydiva / iStock

In many respects, the new health care bill proposed in the U.S. Senate follows the framework of a  GOP plan that passsed in the House last month.

A legislative panel is laying the ground work for a debate over the minimum wage next year. But even traditionally progressive business groups say their members have concerns about raising the state minimum wage to $15 an hour.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

Lawmakers could have overridden two vetoes when they returned to Montpelier on Wednesday. The governor's veto of a pot legalization bill stands, but legislators did strike a deal to approve the state budget. However, their compromise with Gov. Phil Scott puts school boards on the hook to find cost savings.

Gov. Phil Scott says he's troubled by President Trump's comments about the violence in Charlottesville last weekend
Bob Kinzel / VPR file

Gov. Phil Scott says he didn't encourage lawmakers to support the marijuana legalization bill during this week's veto session because passage of the legislation was not a high priority for him.

Many House Republicans and some Democrats voted to block consideration of a new marijuana bill.
Ted S. Warren / AP

Backers of a new marijuana legalization bill say they’re very disappointed that many members of the House Republican caucus and a number of Democrats voted to block consideration of the legislation in Wednesday’s veto session.

Frustrated with the stance taken by the Vermont School Board Association on issues like Act 46 and statewide teacher health care negotiations,some school board members have taken the step of forming a new group. It's called the Alliance of Vermont School Board Members.

Sen. Patrick Leahy, seen here speaking on the floor of the U.S. Senate about the Keystone pipeline at a previous date, says he will support a plan to slow down the Senate in protest of Republican efforts to craft a health care bill.
Office of Sen. Patrick Leahy, courtesy / file

Sen. Patrick Leahy is strongly supporting Democratic Senate Leaders' plan to protest the secrecy surrounding Republican efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act by slowing down the business of the Senate.

The golden dome of the Vermont Statehouse with a blue sky background.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

This week, lawmakers in Montpelier will hold a special veto session to address the big issues where agreement couldn't be reached before adjournment. Vermont Edition talks to top political reporters about days of behind-the-scenes negotiations between lawmakers and the Scott administration – and what any possible deals on the budget and marijuana legalization could look like.

Vermont's two U.S. senators, Patrick Leahy and Bernie Sanders both strongly oppose the new GOP Senate health care plan
crazydiva / iStock

There were very few issues during the legislative session that were as partisan and divisive as the fight over teachers health care.

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