Charlie Nardozzi

Host, Vermont Garden Journal

Charlie Nardozzi is a nationally recognized garden writer, radio and TV show host, consultant, and speaker. You can learn more about organic gardening at Growing with Charlie Nardozzi . Charlie is a guest on VPR's Vermont Edition during the growing season. He also offers garden tips on local television and is a frequent guest on national programs.

www.charlienardozzi.com

Ways to Connect

Training can go a long way when teaching your dog to stay out of the garden.
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If you struggle with the combination of a garden AND dogs, I've got some tips on how to have a dog-friendly garden and a garden-friendly dog.

Euphorbias plants, also known as Spurge, come in many varieties and develop colorful flowers in late spring.
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This group of plants is extremely varied. Some are large, cactus-like trees and shrubs, while others are ground covers. Poinsettias and crown-of-thorns plants are included in this group. Some can also grow as hardy, herbaceous perennials. That's why I'm excited about Euphorbias!

Sweet Potatoes grow well during Vermont summers but be careful not to lose your crop to voles and deer.
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You would think this subtropical vegetable wouldn't have enough time to grow large, edible roots in Vermont. But amazingly, sweet potatoes thrive during our short, intense summers.

Tree peonies are just what they sound like. They have woody stems that survive the winter. Though they may never grow into "trees" in our climate, they do have a shrubby appearance.
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One of my favorite spring perennial flowers is the peony. While many of us grow the herbaceous peonies, there's another type gaining popularity; tree peonies.

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Blueberries are a great home garden crop to grow. They're well adapted to Vermont's climate, easy to grow and productive for years. But some gardeners have a difficult time growing blueberries.

After some up and down spring weather, Memorial Day is usually a safe time to plant most of your veggies and flowers. Most gardeners plant in beds or containers but we should also think vertical.

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As the weather warms up, plants are popping out of the ground and so are the insects.

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It's Mother's Day and what better gift to give mom than a flower basket for her garden or patio.

Mojito cocktail with lime and mint in glass.
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This common perennial herb is known for its many medicinal and culinary uses. And since it's almost Kentucky Derby time, I'm talking about mint!

Different colored foliaged perennials have become very popular. Silver is a color that is often overlooked which I like for brightening dark areas and adding contrast.

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Looking around yards in Vermont, it's clear that raised bed gardening is quite popular. That said, I've put together some tips on building raised beds.

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Lavender is a beautiful plant in the landscape with gray-green leaves and sweet-scented, colorful flowers. There's nothing like viewing and smelling a field of lavender in bloom.

If you're looking for a tough plant to grow in your shade garden with Hostas and Hellebores, look no further than Astilbe.

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Earthworms are generally thought of as a sign of a healthy garden. But that's not the whole story.

Courtesy, pixabay

The beet is a popular root crop originating in North Africa. The root gained popularity in Europe first for its greens then for its root, which can be red, white, yellow or even striped. Some love it, while others loathe it.

With so much snow, you may need some alternatives to clover to help you celebrate St. Patrick's Day.
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There are many plants associated with St. Patrick's Day. The most popular is the Shamrock which is a type of clover. Since clover isn't growing yet, a suitable substitute is the Oxalis plant.

Spring flowerbed in forest.
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If you're looking for a colorful, blooming ground cover for areas under deciduous trees, consider planting Corydalis.

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If you want to get into a tangle with a veggie gardener, then discuss what you think is the best-tasting tomato.

Backyard overlooking golf course, flowerbeds and shrubs.
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Shade can be a curse from preventing you from planting your favorite sun-loving plants or an opportunity to create an interesting landscape. Let's focus on the latter.

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Muster up some patience when planting asparagus. You won't harvest until the third year but, once established, this perennial can produce for decades.

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