Charlotte Albright

Reporter

Charlotte Albright moved to Vermont from Maine in 2006, after more than a decade of reporting and producing for Maine Public Broadcasting Network. She has also contributed  many  stories to NPR. Her first project for Vermont Public Radio was a series on farming, followed by frequent free-lancing. In January 2012 she joined the VPR staff and now covers the Upper Valley and the Northeast Kingdom.

Ways To Connect

Jim Cole / AP/file

Dartmouth College President Philip Hanlon announced Thursday several unprecedented steps that he hopes will create a safer environment on campus. His speech follows concerns about about the rising incidence of sexual assaults and high risk drinking.

Herb Swanson / swanpix.com

A University of Vermont graduate who served in Iraq came to the Upper Valley this week on a peacetime mission: to show veterans and others how to make paper from their uniforms.  

Chart: Building Bright Futures / Data: Vermont Agency of Human Services, Agency of Education, and Federal Ofce of Head Start

Vermont spent about 15 percent of its state budget on early childhood education in 2013. A little less than half of that expense supported K-3 education, and the rest targeted the needs of younger children. But many working families still cannot afford child care, according to a new report from an early childhood advocacy group.

United Way of Chittenden County

With a winter storm bearing down on New England, some homeless people may seek emergency refuge. During the day, they may ask for housing help in person at a Vermont Human Services office. After business hours, they can call VT 2-1-1. On evenings and weekends, those 2-1-1 calls are re-routed to Maine.

Herb Swanson / swanpix.com

When it comes to winter sports in high school, New Hampshire athletes stand ​alone – in some high places.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

By the end of the school year, Vermont must come up with a plan to make sure that students in the poorest parts of the state are getting as much access to experienced, talented teachers as those in wealthier towns. The federal government is requiring states to try to close that so-called equity gap. But federal data that has been published about those discrepancies has some rather glaring errors.

victor / istock

On Tuesday, Jan. 20, the State Board of Education votes on a proposal that will merge two school supervisory unions. The newly formed union would include 10 towns in the White River Valley. It would be the second recent consolidation in Vermont. Supporters say the plan is preliminary, so much remains to be worked out. 

It's been discussed for years, especially in the tiny town of Rochester.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

All this week, the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. will be honored at Dartmouth College. Films, art exhibits, panel discussions, a multi-faith service, a candlelight vigil—all focus not just on civil rights history, but on the future of race relations in America.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

Two of St. Johnsbury’s most striking landmarks are getting glamorous make-overs. Both are legacies from the Fairbanks family, whose scale company brought prosperity to this Northeast Kingdom town at the beginning of the twentieth century.

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

A group of about 30 physicians at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center has completely revamped the way they deliver pre-natal care to make sure patients don’t feel shuffled from doctor to doctor. The move came in response to a pregnant patient who was not happy with the way her appointments were handled.

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