Charlotte Albright

Commentator

Charlotte Albright lives in Lyndonville and currently works in the Office of Communication at Dartmouth College. She was a VPR reporter from 2012 - 2015, covering the Upper Valley and the Northeast Kingdom. Prior to that she freelanced for VPR for several years.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

More and more members of the military are coming back from deployments needing medical attention, and Vietnam-era veterans are aging. 

Charlotte Albright / VPR

Classes are over for the school year, but for many kids, learning is still going on. Over 80 percent of Vermont’s schools say they offer some kind of program during vacation. But quality varies widely and in some communities, there is no summer school.

Charlotte Albright/file / VPR

After a long hiatus, college students could soon return to downtown Lebanon, N.H.  

River Valley Community College, based in Claremont, is in the process of buying the building formerly occupied by Lebanon College and hopes to start offering courses there by next January.

Charlotte Albright/file / VPR

The Upper Valley village of Taftsville will not be getting a large solar array after all.  The developer has withdrawn his offer for the land, and there is a new buyer.

Charlotte Albright / VPR/file

As the state prepares to re-open a controversial shooting range it owns in Hartland, a rift has developed within the Fish and Wildlife Board. One board member says the site is unsafe, but the commissioner strongly disagrees.

Military veterans will soon get expanded access to higher education. They now qualify for in-state tuition at all public colleges and universities even in states where they are only temporary residents.

In Vermont, non-residents pay almost twice as much tuition to state colleges and the University of Vermont as in-state students. That puts military veterans in a bind if they have recently moved or been transferred to a state where they do not have legal residence.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

As many outdoorsy Vermonters are discovering, ticks are in plentiful supply this summer. Bad news for humans at risk for Lyme disease. But the bumper crop is providing ample specimens to study and, amazingly, to dissect with some really tiny scalpels.

Mark Collier / Norwich University

About 20 high school students have been spending this week at Norwich University solving fictional crimes in cyberspace. They're attending a free summer camp funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Security Agency.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

A grocery co-op in the Upper Valley is in turmoil again. The most recent complaints by members of the Food Co-op Stores of the Hanover Consumer Cooperative Society come in response to the firing of a popular employee.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

Surveys show that about 14 percent of young Vermonters try alcohol before they turn 13, and about 7 percent in that age group try pot.  Those percentages rise rapidly as kids get older, and by then it can be too late to change their unhealthy behaviors.

That’s why two schools in Vermont are trying to prevent drug and alcohol abuse with a program called PROSPER.

DragonImages / iStock

Vermont has signed an agreement that will make it easier for colleges and universities to offer online courses across state lines. Currently that interstate approval process can be cumbersome, but now it’s getting streamlined.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

In a little over a year, some Vermont Technical College agriculture students will begin living and working on a beautiful dairy farm in Norwich. The million dollar property, called Norwich Farms, was donated to the school to help expand its curriculum into real-world farming.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

The fate of Concord High School was on a ballot — again — on Tuesday. Last April voters decided to end the secondary program and keep only kindergarten through eighth grade. But a petition drive forced yet another vote in a deeply divided town.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

Look under the rug, or maybe on that hard-to-reach windowsill, and you’ll find the stuff that’s attracting visitors to a quirky Northeast Kingdom gallery this summer. The newest exhibit at the Museum of Everyday Life, near Glover, is called "Dust."

mstroz / iStock

There’s a change on the horizon for people who need help with alcohol and drug addiction. Starting in October, licensed counselors may accept Medicaid payments even if their clients do not have mental health disorders. That new state law is likely to expand access to treatment.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

A proposal for a 2,000-panel solar development in rural Woodstock has some neighbors upset. The selectboard also has concerns about whether the site is too wet and too scenic for a large solar array.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

Opposition is building to a plan by Community National Bank to close two of its downtown locations in the Northeast Kingdom. Over 100 petitioners are asking the bank to reverse its decision, and there will be a public meeting about it this week.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

Two campsites on Clyde Pond in Newport are ready for the summer, thanks to cleanup crews from an alternative education program at North Country High School. It's called North Country Academy; these students don’t thrive in traditional academic settings, but over the past few months they’ve enjoyed kayaking to a rustic worksite.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

A 27-year-old man recovering from drug addiction will graduate from the Community College of Vermont on Saturday. Wayne Miller originally entered college for all the wrong reasons, but made a dramatic turnaround.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

A bankrupt ski resort in West Windsor could become a year-round haven for outdoor sports.  But first the town, with support from a land trust, has to raise enough money to buy a big chunk of the land. 

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