Chris Albertine

Chief Production Engineer

Chris has more than 20 years experience as an audio engineer. In addition to his work for Vermont Public Radio, he has supervised the sound for television documentaries for the Discovery Channel, Turner Broadcast, and the Arts and Entertainment Network.

Ways to Connect

Alyssa Bennett, a small mammal biologist with the Vermont Fish And Wildlife Department, shows the difference in size between the Little Brown Bat and the Big Brown Bat.
Kent McFarland, courtesy / Vermont Center For Ecostudies

A bat will eat about half its weight in insects on a summer night, and it can live more than 30 years. That's a lot of insects! But unfortunately, the disease called white-nose syndrome has taken a huge toll on Vermont's bat population.

This is a Rosy Maple Moth (Dryocampa rubicunda) that Kent McFarland photographed in his back yard.
Kent McFarland, courtesy / Vermont Center For Ecostudies

Attracting, photographing, and identifying moths is a fun family activity. All you need are some lights and a sheet! Biologists Sara Zahendra and Kent McFarland went out into McFarland's back yard in Woodstock to spot some different species and talk about the important role moths play in our ecosystem.

Kent McFarland

Hard hats in hand, Biologists Kent McFarland and Sara Zahendra head to the docks at Lake Champlain. They are taking a boat to Papasquash Island, owned by Audubon Vermont, to help count the new breeding population of common terns.

Roy Pilcher

The arrival of the American Woodcock is one of the exciting signs of spring in Vermont.

Kent McFarland / Vermont Center For Ecostudies.

Porcupines can have as many as 30,000 quills on their bodies, but contrary to the popular myth, they do not 'shoot' them at enemies.  They feast on hemlock branches and are preyed upon by fishers.

Chris Bernier / Vermont Fish And Wildlife Department

Biologists Kent McFarland and Sara Zahendra traveled by snowmobile into the wilderness of the Northeast Kingdom in hopes of spotting a Canada lynx or lynx tracks.

Kent McFarland / Vermont Center For Ecostudies

Crows are the stuff of movies, mysteries and dark lore. They are also smart, gregarious birds with fascinating habits including a gathering called the winter roost when thousands of crows group together late in the day.

Kent McFarland / Vermont Center For Ecostudies

Biologists Kent McFarland and Sara Zahendra visited a deer reporting station in Barre during Youth Hunting Weekend. They talked with biologist John Buck of the Vermont Fish And Game Department about how the state manages the deer herd and the role that deer play in Vermont's ecosystem. 

Kent McFarland / Vermont Center For Ecostudies

Beavers are often thought to be a nuisance, but they also make positive contributions to the environment. 

StoryCorps

Steven Hinds and his daughter Sophia Robins of Montpelier brought laughter to the StoryCorps mobile booth as they shared a wide ranging conversation about what's most important to them.

Chris Albertine / VPR

Putney Mountain is one of the high points in Vermont where bird watchers gather in early fall to see the migration of raptors and butterflies. Biologist Kent McFarland and Sara Zahendra explain how raptors travel for hundreds of miles using as little energy as possible.

StoryCorps

Marisha Morgan and her mother Christine Morgan remember the traumatic night that Marisha's father passed away. They reflect on how the strength Marisha showed that night was the same strength that helped her years later to overcome addiction.

StoryCorps

Jake Burton Carpenter pioneered the sport of snowboarding and is the founder of Burton Snowboards, headquartered in Burlington, Vermont. His wife Donna Carpenter is the company CEO.

StoryCorps

John Tedesco and his wife Shoshana Goldstein came to the StoryCorps mobile booth to talk about how they fell in love – starting with their first date when John told Shoshana he had cancer. They reflect on how their journey has helped them be present with each other and with other people.

StoryCorps

Victoria and Alex Pial came to Vermont from Sudan to make a life in America. In their conversation recorded at the StoryCorps Mobile Booth in Burlington, they talk about the joy of having a family and share their gratitude for the people in Vermont who’ve helped them make this country their home.

Kent McFarland / Vermont Center For Ecostudies

Monarch butterflies are hard to miss with their brilliant orange color and a wingspan that can reach four inches across. But recently they've been difficult to find because their numbers are in decline.

In this edition of Outdoor Radio, biologists Sara Zahendra and Kent McFarland track Monarchs in the flower-filled fields of the Burlington Intervale. We'll learn how Monarchs migrate to Mexico and the challenges to their survival.

Kent McFarland / Vermont Center For Ecostudies

The Birds Of Vermont Museum in Huntington has created pollinator gardens to attract and support bees, butterflies, flies and other insects. 

Kent McFarland

The lake sturgeon is an ancient, long-lived and peculiar fish that lives in Lake Champlain. Lake sturgeon can live as long as 150 years and weigh 300 pounds. They are basically a prehistoric relic — a fishasaurus!

Kent McFarland / Vermont Center For Ecostudies

This month, Outdoor Radio takes you to Salisbury, Vermont where salamanders, newts and frogs are crossing Morgan Road to a swamp where they reproduce. Dozens of volunteers are keeping a tally, and when a car comes along, the volunteers scoop them up so they don't get squashed.

Biologists Kent McFarland and Sara Zahendra are joined by Herpetologist Jim Andrews as the volunteers work with clipboards and flashlights to participate in this rite of Spring.

Over the course of two and a half hours, 44 volunteers counted 512 amphibians.

Kent McFarland / Vermont Center for Ecostudies

Scientists are working diligently to help the majestic American Elm reign once again, after the tree was decimated by Dutch Elm Disease.

In this episode of Outdoor Radio, biologists Sara Zahendra and Kent McFarland of the Vermont Center for Ecostudies are in Plainfield at the foot of a disease-resistant elm. Scientists are taking branch clippings from 60 feet up to pair the buds with other resistant trees.

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