Emily Alfin Johnson

Senior Producer

Emily Alfin Johnson is a senior producer for Vermont Public Radio. Prior to joining VPR in 2015, she worked as a producer for NPR’s On Point and with the NPR Digital Services. She’s a graduate of the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington. 

Ways to Connect

Katherine Welles / iStock

Who gets to call themselves "Vermonters"? We're having a conversation about newcomers, old-timers, and those who have been in Vermont for generations.

A scene from Main Street in Stowe back in October 2012. "Vermont Edition" wants to know what topics you'd like to discuss with your fellow Vermonters.
KenWiedemann / iStock

Vermont Edition brings you the news and conversation about the issues affecting your life. What's a conversation you want to have with your neighbors?

 We'll look at how this generation of Vermonters is redefining what it means to grow old.
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By 2030, the number of Vermonters over 65 will grow by 50 percent. Baby boomers rarely do things the same way their parents did, and retirement is no exception. We're looking at how this generation of Vermonters is redefining what it means to grow old.

Signage in front of a soon-to-be Target in 2013. The first Vermont store, to be located in the University Mall in South Burlington, has attracted strong feelings from Vermonters.
shaunl / iStock

Reactions to the news that Target will be opening its first Vermont store have been all over the place. Some are lamenting the arrival of another "big box store," while others are barely able express their joy in words — instead relying on strings of celebratory emojis.

Courtesy

Target has signed a lease to open a "small-format store" in South Burlington on Dorset Street.

An acre-and-a-half block is available in downtown Rutland, and that got us thinking: What would people in the area like to see fill the space?
Nina Keck / VPR file

It’s not often an-acre-and-a-half of contiguous downtown real estate is available all at one time. But that’s exactly what’s happened in Rutland.

Mark Potok is one of the country's top experts on white supremacy, hate groups and right-wing extremism. He joins us to discuss the current climate in Vermont and across the country.
Valerie Downes, courtesy

Mark Potok joins us in our studio to discuss hate and the current political climate.

Many Vermont mobile home parks were built in the 1960s-1980s. We'll explore the role this housing option plays across the state.
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About 10 percent of Vermonters live in mobile, or manufactured, homes. They provide an important option in a state where affordable housing can be difficult to secure.

Teachers picketed outside the Sustainability Academy at Lawrence Barnes in Burlington on Sept. 14. A new bill to be considered during the 2018 session would prohibit teachers from striking in Vermont.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

More than half of the states in the U.S. prohibit teachers from striking. Should Vermont join them?

Henry Epp / VPR

After four school days on strike, Burlington teachers and the city's school board announced Tuesday evening they had reached a "tentative" deal that would allow classes to resume Wednesday.

VPR/Melody Bodette

When the topic of insurance comes up, most people probably think about fender benders or trips to the emergency room before they think of flooding. But as scientists predict increasingly severe weather events in coming years, Vermonters will likely need to become better acquainted with it.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, seen here in a Facebook video posted Sept. 13, introduces his "Medicare For All" act Wednesday.
screenshot from Facebook live

Sen. Bernie Sanders and his co-sponsors will introduce his "Medicare For All" act Wednesday afternoon. Sanders is streaming his announcement via Facebook Live.

Lt. Governor Zuckerman with two Syrian families resettled in Vermont.
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With his first legislative session as lieutenant governor under his belt, Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman joins us to discuss the major issues facing the state and his focus going forward.

In Lebanon, New Hampshire, this summer sirens are not police officer's signature sound. Instead, you'll know they're coming when you hear the ice cream truck jingle.

Elementary school students in Kansas City, Mo., practice with their eclipse glasses. This post has what you need to monitor the eclipse from here in Vermont.
Charlie Riedel / Associated Press

Vermont will experience a partial eclipse Monday, Aug. 21. Here's everything you need to monitor the solar eclipse from Vermont.

'Brave Little State' host Angela Evancie.
Angela Evancie / VPR

In an AMA Friday, VPR's resident podcast master Angela Evancie let the Vermont reddit community ask her "anything" and did her best to answer! Here are three things you don't want to miss.

As more and more people rely on cell phones to stay connected, landline services, especially in rural areas, are becoming a challenge for providers. But those same customers are often the ones unable to rely on cell phones.
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Live call-in discussion: For some Vermonters, landlines remain a lifeline, a crucial service without many viable alternatives. But as more and more people switch to cellphones, providers are struggling to ensure the future of the traditional landline.

UNICEF, courtesy

If you live in the United States, contracting cholera is probably not a top concern, but in war-torn Yemen an outbreak of the deadly disease affecting over 100,000 people is about to get worse.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

We’re changing the notifications you receive from the VPR mobile apps to give you more control over what you get from VPR. You can now control the categories of notifications you receive from VPR, rather than simply an all-or-nothing approach.

We've been thinking a lot about how we can turn what Vermont Edition airs live each weekday into a better podcast listening experience. And now it's time to fill you in on the changes we're going to make.

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