Emily Alfin Johnson

Senior Producer

Emily Alfin Johnson was a senior producer for Vermont Public Radio.

Ways to Connect

left: Screenshot from web.archive.org, right: U.S. House of Representatives Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence

Bernie Sanders inspired a political movement with his insurgent 2016 run for the Democratic presidential nomination. Yet he's been reluctant to acknowledge that his campaign likely got some help from a Russian covert propaganda campaign.

Anna Ste. Marie / VPR

We wanted to take a second to introduce you to two new members of our team who are with us in Colchester for 14 weeks this spring: our interns!

Jacquelyn Martin / AP

President Trump is speaking at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference. His comments come amid a debate about gun laws after a shooting a high school in Parkland, Fla.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

In an interview Wednesday, Sen. Bernie Sanders said he was unaware that Russian interference was promoting his 2016 presidential campaign.

John Minchillo / AP

NPR is reporting that "a federal grand jury has indicted 13 Russians and three Russian entities in connection with the attack on the 2016 presidential election."

Included in the indictment are details of how the accused allegedly used social media to disseminate information in support of Sen. Bernie Sanders' and Donald Trump's presidential campaigns.

Screenshot from WCAX stream of Vermont State Police Press Conference

Authorities are investigating an officer-involved shooting that took place after a traffic stop on Interstate 89 southbound Sunday, leaving one man dead.

Olympian Sophie Caldwell in a photo outdoors with her grandfather John Caldwell.
Courtesy

You don't have to go far to pass the torch to the next generation of great athletes in Vermont, because in the Green Mountain State, Olympic bloodlines are all in the family.

A photo of the unclassified momo by House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes, R-Calif.
Don Gonyea / NPR

A memo alleging that the FBI abused its surveillance authority became public on Friday after a push by House Republicans.

Paul Sancya, AP; Steve Helber, AP; Screenshot; Pablo Martinez Monsivais, AP

After President Donald Trump's first State of the Union address, multiple responses — both official and otherwise — are to be delivered. Here's what we know and how you can follow along.

Win McNamee / AP

President Donald Trump delivered his first State of the Union address Tuesday night at the Capitol building in Washington, D.C.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Over a thousand demonstrators took over the streets of downtown Montpelier Saturday afternoon as they marched from City Hall to the Statehouse. Organizers are calling it the March for Our Future.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

The federal government is now in a partial shutdown, after Congress failed to pass a measure by midnight that would have kept it funded.

From left, Love signs in Plainfield, Grace Potter, the Jog Bra, Fezzik Wertlieb and witch windows.
VPR

Inspired by the always-radiant Linda Holmes' list of "50 Wonderful Things From 2017" for NPR's Monkey See blog, we bring you "17 Wonderful Vermont Things From 2017" (because 50 is a lot, you guys.)

The single-digit or below days are not over yet, though we did see flurries at our Colchester studio Tuesday.
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

We've now had over eight straight days with temperatures dropping below zero across the Champlain Valley according to the National Weather Service, and more cold's on the way this weekend: a high of minus 5 degrees.

Katherine Welles / iStock

Who gets to call themselves "Vermonters"? We're having a conversation about newcomers, old-timers, and those who have been in Vermont for generations.

A scene from Main Street in Stowe back in October 2012. "Vermont Edition" wants to know what topics you'd like to discuss with your fellow Vermonters.
KenWiedemann / iStock

Vermont Edition brings you the news and conversation about the issues affecting your life. What's a conversation you want to have with your neighbors?

 We'll look at how this generation of Vermonters is redefining what it means to grow old.
stockstudioX / iStock

By 2030, the number of Vermonters over 65 will grow by 50 percent. Baby boomers rarely do things the same way their parents did, and retirement is no exception. We're looking at how this generation of Vermonters is redefining what it means to grow old.

Signage in front of a soon-to-be Target in 2013. The first Vermont store, to be located in the University Mall in South Burlington, has attracted strong feelings from Vermonters.
shaunl / iStock

Reactions to the news that Target will be opening its first Vermont store have been all over the place. Some are lamenting the arrival of another "big box store," while others are barely able express their joy in words — instead relying on strings of celebratory emojis.

Courtesy

Target has signed a lease to open a "small-format store" in South Burlington on Dorset Street.

An acre-and-a-half block is available in downtown Rutland, and that got us thinking: What would people in the area like to see fill the space?
Nina Keck / VPR file

It’s not often an-acre-and-a-half of contiguous downtown real estate is available all at one time. But that’s exactly what’s happened in Rutland.

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