Emily Corwin

Investigative Reporter and Editor

Credit Daria Bishop

  

Emily Corwin reports and edits investigative stories for VPR. She arrived in Vermont by way of New Hampshire Public Radio. There, she covered criminal justice issues, water contamination and the New Hampshire primary, among other things.  When she's not working, she enjoys cross country skiing and biking. 

Email: ecorwin(at)vpr(dot)net

Twitter: @emilycorwin

Joe Gay - an engineer with Casella Waste Systems - stands before the Coventry landfill.
Jane Lindholm / VPR File

The Coventry landfill in northern Vermont will expand by 51 acres. The state issued a permit to the landfill's owners Friday after an extended public comment period.

The NBC studios sign at night in Manhattan, that also says Rainbow Room and Observation Deck.
canbedone / iStock

Saturday Night Live made some fun of Vermont last weekend, with a sketch featuring a group of Southern white nationalists who discuss where to find a “Caucasian paradise.” The skit contrasts Vermont’s liberal, bucolic image with some uncomfortable realities, and was welcomed by people inside and out of the state.

Vermont Public Radio has launched a new podcast called JOLTED. VPR's Emily Corwin, project manager and editor for the podcast, talks about Part 3: Thought, Or Crime?

Corwin said this episode goes into the police's interrogation of Jack Sawyer, where he admitted to buying a gun and ammunition with the intention to shoot up his former school. We also hear an excerpt from that third episode.

Logo for JOLTED, a five-part podcast about a school shooting that didn't happen, the line between thought and crime, and a Republican governor in a rural state who changed his mind about gun laws.
Aaron Shrewsbury for VPR

This month on Brave Little State, we interrupt our regular question-asking to bring you the first installment of JOLTED, a new five-part podcast from the VPR newsroom.

John Conrad, a fly fishing guide for The Fly Rod Shop in Stowe, fishes for brook trout in a stream.
Emily Corwin / VPR

For those who don’t fly fish, people standing perfectly still in the middle of a stream may seem perplexing. 

But if you scramble down the bank and into the river to talk to a fly fishing enthusiast, you may find they are doing more than "just" fishing. They are also applying insect and fish ecology lessons, and — for some — practicing a kind of mindfulness.

Kevin Hoyt

A Republican running for a House seat in Bennington is hoping to raffle two semiautomatic rifles at a pro-firearms rally on Saturday. The flyers he used to advertise the raffles raised concern among state officials this week.

Dr. Hannah Rabin, left, talks with Danny Ciccariello, right, a phlebotomist, at Richmond Family Medicine.
Emily Corwin / VPR

High costs for routine medical labs at the University of Vermont Medical Center are pushing a growing number of medical providers in Chittenden County to look for alternatives out of state.

The Makanda Project plays at City Hall Park in Burlington on a stage while people sit on the lawn and watch.
Emily Corwin / VPR

There will be free live music every day from noon to 8 p.m. in Burlington this week as part of the 35th annual Burlington Discover Jazz Festival.

Julie Ste. Marie in her classroom with student, Avery Sevigny
Julie Ste. Marie, courtesy

Twenty-one thousand Vermonters, many employed by Vermont school districts, have had problems with the health reimbursements they are supposed to receive from their employers.

21,000 Vermonters, many employed by Vermont School Districts, have had problems with the health reimbursements they are supposed to receive from their employers.

Emily Corwin / VPR

The laws that determine how speeding tickets are issued and  processed in Vermont are labyrinthine.

A group of Mount Tabor residents attend 2018 Town Meeting inside an early learning classroom.
Emily Corwin / VPR

At 10 cents for every $100, Mount Tabor’s municipal tax rate is among the lowest in the state. Although the rate has always been low, today it is nearly one third what it was in 1999. That’s the year the state’s transportation committee lowered the speed limit on Route 7 in Mount Tabor — against the recommendation of engineers at the Agency of Transportation.

Since then, a single police sergeant has issued over $2 million in traffic fines, mostly to speeding motorists. That money goes a long way in a town of 255. 

Daria Bishop / VPR

When it comes to the dairy industry in Vermont, there are a lot of questions and myriad answers. We get a lot of both as we listen to a recent "News & Brews" event held at VPR that explored the relationship between agriculture and the environment.

Three speed limit signs, one that says 25 mph, one that says 30 mph along with a No Parking This Side of Street sign, and one that is 35 mph
Emily Corwin, Meg Malone / VPR

In 1999, the chairman of the select board for the town of Mount Tabor requested the speed limit on Route 7 in town be reduced from 50 mph to 45 mph. An Agency of Transportation engineering study seemed to support a speed as high as 60 mph. The agency recommended the limit remain at 50 mph.

A stretch of road in Plymouth, Vermont, with a 35 miles per hour speed limit sign on the right and a car approaching in the distance.
Emily Corwin / VPR

Plymouth, Vermont, issued more than $415,620 in traffic ticket fines in 2017 — more than any other town in Vermont. Most tickets were issued in a 35-mile-per-hour zone on Route 100.  The state has not reviewed the speed limit there in 45 years.

Welcome to Bridgewater sign next to a 25 mph speed limit sign
Emily Corwin / VPR

In 2017, deputies issued more tickets in Bridgewater than anywhere else in the state. The vast majority of these tickets were issued in a 25 mph "school zone" — even though the Bridgewater Village School closed three years ago.

A 25 mph speed limit sign on Patchen Road in South Burlington.
Meg Malone / VPR

VPR launched an investigation into the issuing of traffic tickets around Vermont, specifically looking at which towns issued the greatest total fines and number of tickets.

An illustration of a car pulled over on a road by a police officer and the cop is talking to the driver. There is a blue sky, green mountains and a grey house in the background.
Illustration: Aaron Shrewsbury / For VPR

If you got a traffic ticket in Vermont last year, you’re not alone.

Law enforcement issued more than 24,000 tickets worth upwards of $4 million in fines to drivers in Vermont in 2017. A quarter were issued in just three Vermont towns: Plymouth, Bridgewater and Mount Tabor. 

Stowe attorney Russell Barr, standing in Lamoille County Superior Court Monday, says he has evidence that a Vermont government official was arrested while on official business in China. State officials say they have no records of any such arrest.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

As the lawsuit filed by EB-5 investors against the state moves through the courts, the lawyer representing those investors has taken on a public role: attorney Russell Barr.

Earlier this week, Barr made headlines with scandalous allegations about public officials without making public evidence to back up his claims.

The Vermont Supreme Court. The Vermont Supreme Court overturned the conviction of a man who left KKK recruitment flyers at the Burlington homes of two women of color. The court said the state failed to prove the action constituted an immediate threat.
John Dillon / VPR File

The Vermont Supreme Court has ruled in favor of a Vermont inmate who claims the state violated the law when it awarded a contract for telephone services provided to inmates.

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