Emily Corwin

Investigative Reporter and Editor

Credit Daria Bishop

  

Emily Corwin reports and edits investigative stories for VPR. She arrived in Vermont by way of New Hampshire Public Radio. There, she covered criminal justice issues, water contamination and the New Hampshire primary, among other things.  When she's not working, she enjoys cross country skiing and biking. 

Email: ecorwin(at)vpr(dot)net

Twitter: @emilycorwin

Dr. Hannah Rabin, left, talks with Danny Ciccariello, right, a phlebotomist, at Richmond Family Medicine.
Emily Corwin / VPR

High costs for routine medical labs at the University of Vermont Medical Center are pushing a growing number of medical providers in Chittenden County to look for alternatives out of state.

The Makanda Project plays at City Hall Park in Burlington on a stage while people sit on the lawn and watch.
Emily Corwin / VPR

There will be free live music every day from noon to 8 p.m. in Burlington this week as part of the 35th annual Burlington Discover Jazz Festival.

Julie Ste. Marie in her classroom with student, Avery Sevigny
Julie Ste. Marie, courtesy

Twenty-one thousand Vermonters, many employed by Vermont school districts, have had problems with the health reimbursements they are supposed to receive from their employers.

21,000 Vermonters, many employed by Vermont School Districts, have had problems with the health reimbursements they are supposed to receive from their employers.

Emily Corwin / VPR

The laws that determine how speeding tickets are issued and  processed in Vermont are labyrinthine.

A group of Mount Tabor residents attend 2018 Town Meeting inside an early learning classroom.
Emily Corwin / VPR

At 10 cents for every $100, Mount Tabor’s municipal tax rate is among the lowest in the state. Although the rate has always been low, today it is nearly one third what it was in 1999. That’s the year the state’s transportation committee lowered the speed limit on Route 7 in Mount Tabor — against the recommendation of engineers at the Agency of Transportation.

Since then, a single police sergeant has issued over $2 million in traffic fines, mostly to speeding motorists. That money goes a long way in a town of 255. 

Daria Bishop / VPR

When it comes to the dairy industry in Vermont, there are a lot of questions and myriad answers. We get a lot of both as we listen to a recent "News & Brews" event held at VPR that explored the relationship between agriculture and the environment.

Three speed limit signs, one that says 25 mph, one that says 30 mph along with a No Parking This Side of Street sign, and one that is 35 mph
Emily Corwin, Meg Malone / VPR

In 1999, the chairman of the select board for the town of Mount Tabor requested the speed limit on Route 7 in town be reduced from 50 mph to 45 mph. An Agency of Transportation engineering study seemed to support a speed as high as 60 mph. The agency recommended the limit remain at 50 mph.

A stretch of road in Plymouth, Vermont, with a 35 miles per hour speed limit sign on the right and a car approaching in the distance.
Emily Corwin / VPR

Plymouth, Vermont, issued more than $415,620 in traffic ticket fines in 2017 — more than any other town in Vermont. Most tickets were issued in a 35-mile-per-hour zone on Route 100.  The state has not reviewed the speed limit there in 45 years.

Welcome to Bridgewater sign next to a 25 mph speed limit sign
Emily Corwin / VPR

In 2017, deputies issued more tickets in Bridgewater than anywhere else in the state. The vast majority of these tickets were issued in a 25 mph "school zone" — even though the Bridgewater Village School closed three years ago.

A 25 mph speed limit sign on Patchen Road in South Burlington.
Meg Malone / VPR

VPR launched an investigation into the issuing of traffic tickets around Vermont, specifically looking at which towns issued the greatest total fines and number of tickets.

An illustration of a car pulled over on a road by a police officer and the cop is talking to the driver. There is a blue sky, green mountains and a grey house in the background.
Illustration: Aaron Shrewsbury / For VPR

If you got a traffic ticket in Vermont last year, you’re not alone.

Law enforcement issued more than 24,000 tickets worth upwards of $4 million in fines to drivers in Vermont in 2017. A quarter were issued in just three Vermont towns: Plymouth, Bridgewater and Mount Tabor. 

Stowe attorney Russell Barr, standing in Lamoille County Superior Court Monday, says he has evidence that a Vermont government official was arrested while on official business in China. State officials say they have no records of any such arrest.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

As the lawsuit filed by EB-5 investors against the state moves through the courts, the lawyer representing those investors has taken on a public role: attorney Russell Barr.

Earlier this week, Barr made headlines with scandalous allegations about public officials without making public evidence to back up his claims.

The Vermont Supreme Court. The Vermont Supreme Court overturned the conviction of a man who left KKK recruitment flyers at the Burlington homes of two women of color. The court said the state failed to prove the action constituted an immediate threat.
John Dillon / VPR File

The Vermont Supreme Court has ruled in favor of a Vermont inmate who claims the state violated the law when it awarded a contract for telephone services provided to inmates.

Marijuana clones grow behind glass in Milton, Vt., at the headquarters of Champlain Valley Dispensary/Southern Vermont Wellness, run by Shayne Lynn.
Emily Corwin / VPR File

Right now, the Vermont government is running — in small part — on medical marijuana patients' registration fees. This fact has some medical marijuana patients up in arms.

Vermont Supreme Court in Montpelier.
Lillian Kate Alfin Johnson / VPR/file

At first glance, the numbers look optimistic. After three years of increases in family court cases related to addiction such as child abuse and neglect, numbers were down for fiscal year 2017.

Patrick Warn talks in an office to Lamoille County Sheriff Roger Marcoux.
Emily Corwin / VPR

If Vermont’s county sheriffs are accountable to their voters, but most of their voters don’t pay much attention to them, what happens when they do something wrong?

The single-digit or below days are not over yet, though we did see flurries at our Colchester studio Tuesday.
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

We've now had over eight straight days with temperatures dropping below zero across the Champlain Valley according to the National Weather Service, and more cold's on the way this weekend: a high of minus 5 degrees.

Farm runoff isn't just polluting Vermont lakes and streams — nitrate from manure and fertilizer is also contaminating private drinking wells. And although the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food & Markets has regulatory authority, its response is inconsistent, and often undocumented.

A Jersey heifer peers through a door used to push manure into a manure pit.
Emily Corwin / VPR

A leading source of contamination in Vermont's lakes is nitrate pollution leeching from animal manure on dairy farms. Now VPR Investigative Reporter Emily Corwin has found those nitrates are also finding their way into groundwater and private wells across the state. 

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