Henry Epp

Host/Reporter, All Things Considered

Henry Epp is host of All Things Considered and a reporter at VPR.

Henry came to VPR in 2017 after working for five years as a host and reporter at New England Public Radio (NEPR) in Springfield, Massachusetts. At NEPR, Henry covered local and state elections, the development of a casino in Springfield, college football, a battle rap competition and many stories in between.

Henry was born and raised in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He graduated from Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts in 2012.

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Looking down a wing of closed doors at Camp Hill prison in Pennsylvania
Marc Levy / Associated Press file

Vermont will send more than 200 inmates currently housed at a state-run prison in Pennsylvania to a privately-owned and operated facility in Mississippi.

A bump stock next to a disassembled .22-caliber rifle, shown in 2013. While the House passed a ban on bump stocks Friday, the Senate version of S.55 did not include such a provision.
Allen Breed / Associated Press File

On Oct. 1, it will be illegal in Vermont to possess bump stocks — a device that attaches to a semi-automatic weapon to speed up the rate it fires.

And starting Monday, Sept. 17, the Vermont State Police will accept bump stocks from residents who voluntarily turn them over.

Molly Kelly won the Democratic gubernatorial primary in New Hampshire Tuesday night.
Elise Amendola / AP

Tuesday, voters in New Hampshire went to the polls in the state’s primary election. Now the stage is set for several major races in the Granite State, including the contest for governor and both of the state's seats in the U.S House.

Shelby Semmes speaks at an event in Richmond announcing a study on the return on investment for conservation land in Vermont.
Henry Epp / VPR

Every dollar that Vermont spends on conservation land generates a $9 return — that's the finding of a study out Wednesday from a group of conservation-related nonprofits in the state.

A three-panel picture with downtown scenes from Barre City, Montpelier in winter, and the roundabout in Winooski.
Left to right: Steve Zind, Kirk Carapezza, Angela Evancie / VPR

This week, the Vermont chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union sent letters to six cities and towns demanding they repeal local ordinances that ban panhandling. 

Demolition on a downtown Burlington mall, seen here in June, began earlier this year. Construction on a redevelopment at the site has been paused for several weeks.
Henry Epp / VPR

Earlier this year, a mall in downtown Burlington was mostly demolished in order to make way for a mixed-use development that would include a 14-story building, which would be the tallest in the city.

Jackie and Jim Heltz's film "Lake Effect" examines recent Dartmouth-HItchcock research around cyanobacteria and ALS.
Jackie Heltz / Courtesy

In the last few years, researchers at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center have been looking into a possible connection between cyanobacteria from blue-green algae blooms and the neurodegenerative disease ALS.

The research is preliminary, so any possible correlation is not proven. But the studies — and the issue of algae blooms in northern New England — are the subject of a new documentary by Jackie Heltz, a filmmaker who grew up in Williston.

looking up at an Elmwood Avenue street sign
Ari Snider / VPR

According to initial test results from the Environmental Protection Agency, levels of airborne chemicals in Burlington's Old North End neighborhood are below those considered dangerous to human health by the federal government.

Looking up from ground-level at the exterior of MGM Resort's casino in Springfield, Mass. opens his Friday. It's the first full-fledged casino in that state, which legalized casino gambling nearly seven years ago.
Charles Krupa / Associated Press

On Friday, MGM Resorts will open a long-planned casino in Springfield, Massachusetts, putting a gambling resort about an hour-long drive from Brattleboro, Vermont.

Drivers from Burlington cross the bridge over the Winooski River Tuesday afternoon.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

In 1996, the Northeastern U.S saw a sudden increase in the number of "extreme precipitation" events. And ever since then, that number has stayed elevated. So a group of researchers at Dartmouth College set out to figure out why.

The primary races are decided, and we're on to the general election campaign in Vermont. Christine Hallquist won the Democratic nomination for governor, and incumbent Gov. Phil Scott won the Republican nomination.

Gov. Phil Scott speaking into a microphone in the VPR Talk Studio.
Anna Ste. Marie / VPR

Incumbent Republican Gov. Phil Scott turns to his re-election campaign for the general election, after securing his party’s nomination Tuesday night by warding off a challenge from Keith Stern.

Lucas Campbell operates one of the few landing crafts on Lake Champlain. Here, he readies the boat to take off from Burton Island State Park.
Henry Epp / VPR

Lake Champlain has a long history as a commercial waterway. In the 1800s, it was a crowded passage for boats hauling lumber and other goods between New York City and Montreal and points in between.

Much of that industry is long gone, but there's still some work on the lake for those who want it.

Roque "Rocky" De La Fuente, a San Diego businessman, is running in the Republican primary for U.S. Senate in Vermont.
Matt Volz / Associated Press

Roque "Rocky" De La Fuente is a San Diego businessman. Though he doesn't live in Vermont, he's filed to run in the Republican primary for U.S. Senate here on Aug. 14.

Burlington Community Boathouse Marina view from the lake on a blue-sky day.
Meg Malone / VPR

July was the hottest month ever recorded in Burlington, Vermont, according to records from the local office of the National Weather Service.

Paul Costello, left, and Peter Walke, are co-chairs of the governor's Vermont Climate Action Commission, which met for the first time Tuesday. They say Vermont can use emissions-reduction initiatives to advance the state economy.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

A report out Tuesday recommended ways the state of Vermont can reduce greenhouse gas emissions while also encouraging economic growth.

Reporters Courtney Lamdin and Colin Flanders
Henry Epp / VPR

Reporting by Milton's local newspaper has led police there to investigate embezzlement within the Milton Broncos youth football program, which runs football teams for children in first through eighth grade.

Norwich University in Northfield, Vermont is trying out a program where some students will receive reduced tuition in exchange for a percentage of their income for a set time after they graduate.
Patti Daniels / VPR File

If you’re going to college this fall, instead of taking out a student loan to help pay tuition, how about getting some money up front from your school? But there's a catch: Your school will take a percentage of your income for a set amount of time after you graduate.

The sign outside of the University of Vermont Medical Center in Burlington.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

Union nurses at the University of Vermont Medical Center are hours away from a planned two-day strike. Negotiations are happening this afternoon, but nurses and the hospital administration have so far been unable to reach a contract agreement since they began talks in late March.

Musician Bryan Blanchette performs at an Abenaki festival in Burlington.
Henry Epp / VPR

Abenaki artists, musicians and civic leaders gathered in downtown Burlington Saturday for a celebration of their tribes' history, art and culture.

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