Henry Epp

Host/Reporter, All Things Considered

Henry Epp is host of All Things Considered and a reporter at VPR.

Henry came to VPR in 2017 after working for five years as a host and reporter at New England Public Radio (NEPR) in Springfield, Massachusetts. At NEPR, Henry covered local and state elections, the development of a casino in Springfield, college football, a battle rap competition and many stories in between.

Henry was born and raised in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He graduated from Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts in 2012.

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The sign outside of the University of Vermont Medical Center in Burlington.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

Union nurses at University of Vermont Medical Center in Burlington are meeting Wednesday to consider the latest contract offer from the hospital. The union and the hospital have been in contract negotiations since March.

The Swanton sector of U.S. Border Patrol covers nearly 300 miles of the U.S.-Canada border, including parts of New York and all of Vermont and New Hampshire.
Ryan Caron King / New England News Collaborative/file

Last week, John Pfeifer retired from his position as Chief Patrol Agent for the U.S. Border Patrol in the Swanton Sector.

Chittenden County State's Attorney Sarah George, seen at a press conference Friday, will not file charges in a police shooting that took place in February.
Henry Epp / VPR

Vermont Attorney General TJ Donovan announced Friday he will not bring criminal charges against two police officers who shot a man on the side of Interstate 89 in February.

Keurig Green Mountain is laying off 35 workers, including some at the company's Waterbury facility, seen here.
Henry Epp / VPR

Keurig Green Mountain is laying off 35 people in Vermont, effective Friday, June 1, according to the state’s Department of Labor.

Gregory Zullo, center, at the Vermont Supreme Court Wednesday.
Henry Epp / VPR

Attorneys made arguments Wednesday before Vermont's highest court in a case involving a traffic stop that allegedly stemmed from racial profiling.

Car keys on a wooden surface.
alfexe / iStock

When people fail to pay a court or administrative fine, most states can suspend that person’s driver’s license. According to a new report by the Washington Post, that may have happened to more than 7 million people around the country.

Vermont's Department of Health tested the blood of 477 people in Bennington County. This week, the EPA held a conference to discuss issues around chemicals like PFOA.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

This week, the Environmental Protection Agency held a summit in Washington D.C. to discuss the environmental impact of chemicals known as PFAS.

SunCommon warehouse filled with solar panels.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR File

A Vermont solar company is expanding into New York's Hudson Valley.

Looking over the Winooski River to a building on a cloudy day.
Angela Evancie / VPR

For a time, Chittenden County had a bustling French Canadian population. There was even a "Little Canada" in Winooski. And you can still find it today, if you know where to look.

The Vermont Supreme Court building in Montpelier turns 100 years old this year.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

This year, the building that holds the Vermont Supreme Court turns 100. On Friday, state officials will celebrate that anniversary.

A statue of Ethan Allen outside the Vermont Statehouse on a blue-sky day.
Bob Kinzel / VPR

You probably at least know Ethan Allen as one of the founders of the state of Vermont — a sort of mythic, heroic figure. Well, a new book tells a more complicated story of Allen and the Green Mountain Boys and the battles they fought. 

This is the time of year when many Vermonters have a pile of branches or other debris that they want to burn. But it's also the time of year when weather conditions make it easy for fires to spread out of control.

An issue of "Vermont Life" magazine on a table.
Henry Epp / VPR File

Days after the state announced Vermont Life magazine would end print publication, the people who hoped to continue the magazine are shaking their heads.

The end of the legislative session in Vermont is getting closer and closer, but the fight between Republican Gov. Phil Scott and the Democratic-controlled legislature seems to be intensifying.

An issue of "Vermont Life" magazine on a table.
Henry Epp / VPR File

Vermont's long-running promotional magazine will end print publication this month.

The House chamber of the Vermont Legislature
Angela Evancie / VPR/file

Democratic lawmakers in Vermont have been working hard on two big policy initiatives this session. One bill would raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. The other would establish a paid family and medical leave program for most employees.

But as the end of the session nears, both of those bills may suddenly be in jeopardy.

Vermont State Police

Vermont State Police say law enforcement officers arrested two Highgate residents wanted in connection with a body found over the weekend.

Men work in a granite processing facility.
Vermont Historical Society

There was a time when it was totally normal to hear French spoken in some of Vermont’s smallest towns and biggest cities.

The chances of winning the lottery are pretty slim, but for the owners of stores selling tickets in Vermont, winning happens with surprising frequency according to a new investigation by VTDigger. 

The Board of Trustees at College of St. Joseph is considering closing the school as it faces low enrollment and budget pressure.
Nina Keck / VPR

Last week, news surfaced that College of St. Joseph in Rutland is considering closing its doors for good. The private, Catholic liberal arts school currently has around 200 undergraduates.

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