Howard Weiss-Tisman

Reporter For Southern Vermont & The Connecticut River Valley

Howard Weiss-Tisman is VPR's reporter for Southern Vermont & the Connecticut River Valley. He worked at the Brattleboro Reformer for 11 years, reporting on most towns in the region and specializing on statewide issues including education, agriculture, energy and mental health. Howard received a BA in Journalism from University of Massachusetts. He filed his first story with VPR in September 2015.

Ways to Connect

An illustration of a row of houses with a green background.
filo / iStock

The Vermont Department of Taxes was not able to process all of the property tax adjustment claims in time to meet a July 1 deadline. As a result, towns that sent out their tax bills on that date may have sent the wrong information to property owners.

Mount Ascutney in the fall with a covered bridge crossing a body of water.
Barbara Noll / Associated Press File

The State of Vermont Board of Libraries voted unanimously Tuesday against a petition to change the name of Mount Ascutney to Kaskadenak, an Abenaki name.

A Brattleboro Retreat sign.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press File

The Vermont Attorney General's Office announced Monday that it found "no criminal misconduct" following a five-year investigation of the Brattleboro Retreat, a mental health treatment facility in southern Vermont.

Marlboro resident Marco Panella dives into South Pond for his daily swim across the water.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

South Pond, in the Windham County town of Marlboro, is only open to town residents.

That means during the summer, South Pond is the village green, the playground and the town pool. It’s where families share potlucks and people come to unwind, exercise and re-energize.

Rob Hutchins stands in front of the West Windsor municipal building with Mount Ascutney in the background.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

A Windsor County resident wants to change the name of Mount Ascutney, and the state department that has the authority to do so has scheduled a special hearing to consider his request.

A water fountain mounted on a wall.
gerenme / iStock

The Vermont Department of Health is adding three new polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, to its drinking water advisory, and the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation says it will be testing the drinking water in 10 schools that have used cleaning supplies that contain the chemicals.

A row of classroom desks
mygueart / iStock

The State Board of Education has laid out its ground rules for a series of meetings that will give school districts a chance to push back against the education secretary’s proposed Act 46 state plan.

Vermont Yankee, pictured in 2013, in Vernon, Vt.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press File

The Public Utility Commission will postpose its decision on a proposed deal to sell the shuttered Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant in Vernon.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

For those with a green thumb, growing supplies are an essential step to taking advantage of Act 86 — Vermont's new marijuana law.

Blood tests. A new federal report looks at the long-term health effects of PFOA.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR file

A new federal report on the health effects of perfluorinated compounds, including PFOA, could force Vermont to lower its safe drinking water standard.

t. John Flannigan, left, and Capt. James Whitcomb sit at a table looking at each other in front of recording equipment.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Starting on July 1, it will be legal for adults 21 and older to possess up to an ounce of marijuana under Vermont state law — and that will bring about changes in how the police interact with motorists.

Actors perform Sinclair Lewis' "It Can't Happen Here." In this scene, Vermont newspaper editor Doremus Jessup (Peter Mendes) confronts the president of the United States, Buzz Windrip (Daniel L. Patterson) through an editorial he reads aloud.
Linda Treash, Courtesy

What would happen if a fascist dictator was elected president of the United States, after winning an election built on fear and hate-mongering? That's the premise of the 1935 novel It Can't Happen Here, which Sinclair Lewis wrote while living in Barnard.

A stretch of road with a mini cell tower on a utility pole that a car is driving by.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR/File

The state says it can’t force Consolidated Communications to turn its DSL service back on for the troubled CoverageCo cell phone provider.

courtesy of Kate Hamilton, Office of Rep. Peter Welch

Rep. Peter Welch says children are being held in metal-fenced cages while many of their families seek asylum in the United States.

Paper bag lunches lined up on a table and plastic bags of cucumber slices.
Melody Bodette / VPR

The nonprofit Hunger Free Vermont is working with school districts around the state to kick off this year’s statewide free summer meals program.

Barbara George, a volunteer at the Estey Organ Museum, looks over a pile of broken organs at the museum's storage facility.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

A southern Vermont museum dedicated to organs has found itself with a surplus of the instruments.

Chaunce Benedict, from Swanton, attended the State Board of Education meeting in Barre. Benedict is a former superintendent and says small schools should not lose their annual grant payments.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The State Board of Education is bumping up against a June 30 deadline for addressing proposed changes to Vermont’s small school grant program.

Desks in a line in an empty classroom. Up close of one with books in it.
GlobalStock / iStock

The Vermont State Board of Education has released a schedule for its three regional meetings to collect local testimony on the statewide Act 46 merger plan that was recently released by the Agency of Education.

Exterior of Wolcott Elementary School on an overcast day.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

A nearly 200-page report was released by the Vermont Agency of Education on Friday, and school districts around Vermont are going through the state's school consolidation recommendations.

A stretch of road with a mini cell tower on a utility pole that a car is driving by.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR/File

The Vermont Department of Public Service says it’s not yet ready to give up on CoverageCo, the struggling cell service company.

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