Howard Weiss-Tisman

Reporter

Howard Weiss-Tisman is VPR's southern Vermont correspondent, covering Windham and southern Windsor counties. He worked at the Brattleboro Reformer for 11 years, reporting on most towns in the region and specializing on statewide issues including education, agriculture, energy and mental health. Howard received a BA in Journalism from University of Massachusetts. He filed his first story with VPR in September 2015.

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The tiny town of Stamford is looking into forming a new school district with nearby Clarksburg, Massachusetts, to meet the provisions of Act 46.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Without a federal education program that offers academic and emotional support to disadvantaged students pursuing a bachelor's degree, Kara Polito says she would have dropped out of college.

Vermont has one of the toughest school concussion laws in the country, and now officials want to know how the law is being implemented.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Airbnb reached an agreement with the state last year to collect the rooms and meals tax from Vermonters who use the online service to rent out their property. But in some communities, the issues raised by Airbnb go beyond dollars and cents.

Angela Evancie / VPR file

The Public Service Board on Tuesday filed its final rule for wind turbine noise standards.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

It always makes the headlines when a police officer shoots someone who is undergoing a mental health crisis. But when the police defuse a potentially violent situation, the news doesn't travel as far.

The Public Service Board is siding with the owners of the Georgia Mountain Community Wind project over continued testing of the sound levels near the wind turbines.

Despite several years of trying, some Vermont school districts haven't been able to come up with merger plans under Act 46, the state's school district consolidation law.

Toby Talbot / AP file

The Public Service Board held a series of meetings this week on its proposed sound standards for wind turbines.

School districts in central and southern Vermont are set to merge after voters approved three Act 46 school district consolidation plans Tuesday.

A Vermont slaughterhouse received four United States Department of Agriculture violations in the past year, and an animal rights group is asking regulators to consider withdrawing the plant's federal inspection program.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

If you use Google Maps on your phone to find a business in Bennington, you may end up in the tiny town of Woodford. That's because a glitch in the map app fails to recognize many locations in the largest town in southwestern Vermont.

The company that's suspected of contaminating water with the chemical PFOA has agreed to pay for the next level of engineering study for a municipal water extension.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Two years ago, Vermont started a public pre-K program that pays for up to 10 hours of preschool for 3-to-5-year olds. Now, the state has issued a report for the Legislature that shows that there have been mixed results so far.

Union Institute & University will offer a tuition break to members of the Brattleboro and Central Vermont chambers of commerce.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Bennington residents who have been dealing with contaminated water are starting to get frustrated with the state's ability to find a long-term solution to their problem.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

An education bill that's being debated in the Vermont Statehouse could raise some separation of power issues between the legislative and executive branches.

The State Board of Education is going to ask the Legislature to put money aside so the board can hire paid staff members to tackle an ever-growing list of education priorities.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Fadia Thabet, a student at the School for International Training in Brattleboro, was recently awarded an International Women of Courage Award from the U.S. State Department.

Toby Talbot / AP

The Public Service Board has approved the sale of 13 hydroelectric stations along the Connecticut and Deerfield rivers to a Boston-based investment firm. The board issued its decision Thursday.

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