Howard Weiss-Tisman

Reporter For Southern Vermont & The Connecticut River Valley

Howard Weiss-Tisman is VPR's reporter for Southern Vermont & the Connecticut River Valley. He worked at the Brattleboro Reformer for 11 years, reporting on most towns in the region and specializing on statewide issues including education, agriculture, energy and mental health. Howard received a BA in Journalism from University of Massachusetts. He filed his first story with VPR in September 2015.

Ways to Connect

The exterior of the brick  Chester-Andover Elementary School.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Things got off to a rocky start this year for Chester-Andover Elementary School, after a water main leak flooded the building just before school opened. Now about 240 displaced elementary students are spending their days learning at the local high school.

A pile of bags and other personal belongings in a church basement.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

On some of the coldest nights of the year, a state-run program helps find emergency housing for people. The Vermont Department for Children and Families is now planning a revamp of the rules that govern this program, which has been around for more than 50 years.

AP/Toby Talbot

The state will expand a high-speed broadband network that could serve hundreds of customers in the Northeast Kingdom.

Springfield High School Nurse Jenny Anderson stands outside a shut wood door that says HEALTH CLINIC on it.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The Springfield School District will offer medical, dental and mental health services under an agreement recently reached with the nearby Springfield Medical Care Systems.

The exterior of Townshend Elementary School on a blue-sky day.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Vermont’s public education system is at a crossroads — and school districts across the state are trying to determine a way forward in order to provide a 21st-century education to students in a rural state with declining enrollment. 

The painting "Red Square" by Helen Frankenthaler.
Bennington College, Courtesy

Bennington College will sell works of art from its collection to help kick off a new scholarship program.

A streetview of downtown Wilmington, Vermont.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Selectboard member Ann Manwaring says the town of Wilmington is considering a proposal to ban plastic bags and will take up the issue at its next meeting.

The exterior of the the Joseph C. McNeil Generating Station in Burlington
National Renewable Energy Laboratory / Associated Press

If Burlington is ever able to get its district heating proposal off the ground, the state would not have the authority to regulate the system.

The Public Utility Commission this week effectively ruled against itself, saying that the commission doesn’t have jurisdiction over the proposed heating service.

The exterior of the Windham County Superior Court in Newfane.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The state wants a judge to dismiss a lawsuit that challenges Vermont’s public education funding system.

The Windham County town of Whitingham, along with resident Madeline Klein and Sadie Boyd, a student in the town’s school system, filed the suit late last year.

Adam Silver stands looking out of a window in a Brattleboro apartment.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

As companies like Uber and Airbnb continue growing across Vermont, two new state laws to better regulate the "gig economy" are now in effect. 

Officer Ryan Washburn, left, and Everyone's Books co-owner Nancy Braus stand in the Brattleboro bookstore.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

A bookstore owner in Brattleboro is donating books to the Police Department for individuals who have to spend the night locked up, waiting to be arraigned.

A stock photo close up of the blue lights atop a police cruiser.
deepblue4you / iStock.com

Vermont’s law enforcement agencies are adding nine new "drug recognition experts," or DREs, as the state sees an increase in the number of drug-impaired driving incidents and crashes.

Headshot of Republican Sen. John McCain.
Cliff Owen / Associated Press

The members of Vermont’s congressional delegation are all remembering the late Sen. John McCain. The Republican senator from Arizona died Saturday at the age of 81.

H. Brooke Paige won the GOP nomination to six statewide offices in Vermont’s primary election. He has withdrawn from five of the six races he won.
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR file

Republican candidate H. Brooke Paige has withdrawn from five of the six statewide offices he won during primary voting on August 14.

A stretch of road with a mini cell tower on a utility pole that a car is driving by.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR/File

The state has decided to give up on CoverageCo, the troubled cell service company that abruptly began turning off its network earlier this year.

A row of classroom desks
mygueart / iStock

The Agency of Education has released a draft version of the articles of agreement that will be used by school districts that are forced to merge under Act 46.

Mobile phone antennaes on a telecommunication tower on a blue-sky background.
Emanuele D'Amico / iStock

The state wants to make it easier for telecommunication companies to upgrade their cell towers.

Teacher Steve Butz, left, helps Lucas Kindel with an iPad that will take a 3D photo on a site Butz thinks dates back to the end of the 18th century.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

There’s a good chance that one of Vermont’s most important historical sites has been hidden away high on a mountaintop in Bennington County. And teacher Steve Butz has been spending the past five years trying to uncover it and let the world know what’s hidden there.

Shirts with Vermont Law School on them hang in Barrister's Book Shop in downtown South Royalton.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

In South Royalton, there’s a great craft beer bar, a bustling food co-op and a new coffee shop opening — but just about anyone you ask will tell you the town’s economic future depends on a healthy Vermont Law School.

Shirley Plucinski

The recent VPR-Vermont PBS poll found very little name recognition for the Democratic gubernatorial candidates running in next week's primary election.

Brenda Siegel thinks that might a good thing.

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