Howard Weiss-Tisman

Reporter For Southern Vermont & The Connecticut River Valley

Howard Weiss-Tisman is VPR's reporter for Southern Vermont & the Connecticut River Valley. He worked at the Brattleboro Reformer for 11 years, reporting on most towns in the region and specializing on statewide issues including education, agriculture, energy and mental health. Howard received a BA in Journalism from University of Massachusetts. He filed his first story with VPR in September 2015.

Ways to Connect

Headshot of Republican Sen. John McCain.
Cliff Owen / Associated Press

The members of Vermont’s congressional delegation are all remembering the late Sen. John McCain. The Republican senator from Arizona died Saturday at the age of 81.

H. Brooke Paige won the GOP nomination to six statewide offices in Vermont’s primary election. He has withdrawn from five of the six races he won.
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR file

Republican candidate H. Brooke Paige has withdrawn from five of the six statewide offices he won during primary voting on August 14.

A stretch of road with a mini cell tower on a utility pole that a car is driving by.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR/File

The state has decided to give up on CoverageCo, the troubled cell service company that abruptly began turning off its network earlier this year.

A row of classroom desks
mygueart / iStock

The Agency of Education has released a draft version of the articles of agreement that will be used by school districts that are forced to merge under Act 46.

Mobile phone antennaes on a telecommunication tower on a blue-sky background.
Emanuele D'Amico / iStock

The state wants to make it easier for telecommunication companies to upgrade their cell towers.

Teacher Steve Butz, left, helps Lucas Kindel with an iPad that will take a 3D photo on a site Butz thinks dates back to the end of the 18th century.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

There’s a good chance that one of Vermont’s most important historical sites has been hidden away high on a mountaintop in Bennington County. And teacher Steve Butz has been spending the past five years trying to uncover it and let the world know what’s hidden there.

Shirts with Vermont Law School on them hang in Barrister's Book Shop in downtown South Royalton.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

In South Royalton, there’s a great craft beer bar, a bustling food co-op and a new coffee shop opening — but just about anyone you ask will tell you the town’s economic future depends on a healthy Vermont Law School.

Shirley Plucinski

The recent VPR-Vermont PBS poll found very little name recognition for the Democratic gubernatorial candidates running in next week's primary election.

Brenda Siegel thinks that might a good thing.

Jessica Keene stands on the Quechee Gorge Bridge in front of a sign she made that reads, "Step back. You're worth it." The card also has the phone number for the national suicide prevention hotline.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Two local women are putting up index cards, with messages of support and hope, in an attempt to reach anyone who might be contemplating suicide on the Quechee Gorge Bridge.

Bennington College professor David Bond, center, oversees work on the campus to investigate PFOA in groundwater.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Scientists from Bennington College say they've uncovered PFOA contamination far beyond the neighborhoods with polluted wells.

Take a water sample in a sink.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

When perfluorinated chemicals were first found in southwestern Vermont, very few people in the state had even heard of the dangerous compound. But now scientists here, and across the country, are finding more and more of it in the environment.

Information sheets on PFAS sit on Grafton Elementary School Principal Liz Harty's desk. The school is one of two with levels of the chemicals above the state's safe drinking water standard.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Two Vermont schools have levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) above Vermont’s safe drinking water standard.

Exterior of the Londonderry Volunteer Rescue Squad building.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Vermont’s first responders can face life-and-death situations any time they show up at a scene. But this week the Londonderry Volunteer Rescue Squad dealt with five fatalities, and now support is being provided to these volunteers that serve this community.

The town of Brattleboro has been removing posters that were allegedly put up by a neo-Nazi group based in the South.

At a meeting in Hartford, a roomful of people listen to VTrans project manager JB McCarthy talk about plans to install a temporary fence on the Quechee Gorge bridge.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The Vermont Agency of Transportation says it wants to have a temporary fence up on the Quechee Gorge Bridge before the middle of September to try to cut down on any more suicides at the popular tourist attraction.

The Southern State Correctional Facility in Springfield. In a report to the federal government, Vermont disclosed that 17 inmates were sexually victimized in state-run prisons last year.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR File

The Joint Fiscal Office will do a complete evaluation of the state’s prison health care system.

Nurses from the Brattleboro Retreat stand outside the hospital to bring attention to recent changes made to their schedules.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Nurses at the Brattleboro Retreat have been holding informational pickets in front of the southern Vermont psychiatric hospital to bring attention to what they say are radical schedule changes enacted by the administration that violate their union contract.

An illustration of a row of houses with a green background.
filo / iStock

The Vermont Department of Taxes was not able to process all of the property tax adjustment claims in time to meet a July 1 deadline. As a result, towns that sent out their tax bills on that date may have sent the wrong information to property owners.

Mount Ascutney in the fall with a covered bridge crossing a body of water.
Barbara Noll / Associated Press File

The State of Vermont Board of Libraries voted unanimously Tuesday against a petition to change the name of Mount Ascutney to Kaskadenak, an Abenaki name.

A Brattleboro Retreat sign.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press File

The Vermont Attorney General's Office announced Monday that it found "no criminal misconduct" following a five-year investigation of the Brattleboro Retreat, a mental health treatment facility in southern Vermont.

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