Howard Weiss-Tisman

Reporter

Howard Weiss-Tisman is VPR's southern Vermont correspondent, covering Windham and southern Windsor counties. He worked at the Brattleboro Reformer for 11 years, reporting on most towns in the region and specializing on statewide issues including education, agriculture, energy and mental health. Howard received a BA in Journalism from University of Massachusetts. He filed his first story with VPR in September 2015.

Ways to Connect

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Windham Farm and Food was started in 2009 to make it easier for schools to order more food directly from farms.

The program has been growing steadily, and a USDA grant is now going to allow the staff to purchase a refrigerated truck, which could help the group reach even more consumers and farms.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR/file

The owner of the Hermitage Inn and Ski Club in Wilmington has agreed to pay $72,000 in fines and restitutions for damaging a snowmobile trail in the Green Mountain National Forest.

Patti Daniels / VPR

A lawyer representing Champlain Housing Trust says an emergency housing facility in Shelburne does not violate local zoning codes.

The state Board of Education is considering asking lawmakers to approve funding for three new positions it says are needed to administer Act 46, the state's new education consolidation law.

The board will vote at its Oct. 20 meeting on whether to forward the request to the chairs of the Senate and House appropriations committees.

The state Board of Education does not have paid staff members, but Chairman Stephan Morse says the board needs the help as districts begin to move ahead with consolidation.

3Trinity / iStock.com

The Department for Children and Families sent out a memo in August asking local housing advocates to come up with alternatives to using motels for emergency housing.

Patti Daniels / VPR

The town of Shelburne is asking Champlain Housing Trust to either apply for a permit or stop using the property at 3164 Shelburne Road as emergency housing for the homeless.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Every other year Brattleboro's Hilltop Montessori Middle School travels to Alabama as part of their studies on the Civil Rights Era and racial identity.

Since their first trip the people of Gee's Bend have welcomed the Vermont students and their teachers into their community.

strelss / iStock.com

The Vermont Council on Rural Development wants the state to become a leader in growing the green economy as scientists, governments and entrepreneurs confront the effects of climate change.

The council is going around the state to gather input on these issues, and held a forum in Brattleboro.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has determined that Entergy Vermont Yankee's Irradiated Fuel Management plan is consistent with NRC requirements, and that the plan's funding is adequate.

Kathleen Kolb / Courtesy

Vermont's farmland, with its lush green fields, iconic red barns and black and white Holsteins have inspired many artists.

At a new exhibit at the Brattleboro Museum and Art Center, "Shedding Light on the Working Forest," painter Kathleen Kolb is urging viewers to consider the state's forest industry with the same appreciation.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Comcast's Certificate of Public Good expires at the end of 2016 and the Public Service Board will be starting hearings this month. Vermont’s public access television stations say they have a lot riding on Comcast cable company’s application to renew its certificate.

The company provides funding for 22 of the state's 26 public access stations and station directors say they want to start a conversation about how the company helps pay for public access.

AP File Photo

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has sided with Entergy Vermont Yankee on a decision to shut down a radiological monitoring system at its Vernon nuclear power plant.

Entergy had asked the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board to allow it to cut back on the Emergency Response Data System, which Vermont said it needed to continue monitoring the radiological activity at the plant.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Doreen Cooney has owned the Deerfield Valley Inn in West Dover for 17 years and she is ready to try something new.

She put the property on the market last year, and after a pending deal with a potential buyer fell through she decided she would try something different to help her get out of the bed and breakfast business:

Cooney wants to give away the historic Deerfield Valley Inn.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

You can't miss the new Nicole Goodner MacFarlane Center when you enter Landmark College. 

The brand new 28,500 square-foot building dominates the view as you drive onto the Putney campus.

Michelle Bower is chair of the mathematics and computer science department and she says the school's new science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM center, makes a statement about Landmark's focus on research and science.

Entergy Vermont Yankee has reached an agreement with the state of New Hampshire over the company's request to reduce the emergency planning  zone,  or EPZ, around the closed nuclear power plant in Vernon.

Entergy says the 10-mile EPZ should be eliminated after April 2016 as the plant undergoes decommissioning and the risk of a nuclear emergency is reduced.

The state of Vermont is fighting Entergy's request

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Developers who want to build a commercial wind project in Windham and Grafton say environmental surveys will start soon which will give them a clearer picture of where the turbines might go.

MilosJokic / iStock.com

School boards, administrators and parents confused by Vermont's new education reform law got some clarification last week from the State Board of Education.

Bull Stockwell Allen / The Hermitage Club

An exclusive members-only ski resort in Wilmington has big plans for development.

tostphoto / iStock.com

The federal government is working to come up with rules to regulate drones, but as the emerging technology gets more popular, Vermont towns are contemplating whether they need their own policies on drone use to protect their citizens' privacy and safety.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

It may not be highlighted in the history books, but one Vermont town claims it was the site of the first casualties of the Revolutionary War.

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