Howard Weiss-Tisman

Reporter For Southern Vermont & The Connecticut River Valley

Howard Weiss-Tisman is VPR's reporter for Southern Vermont & the Connecticut River Valley. He worked at the Brattleboro Reformer for 11 years, reporting on most towns in the region and specializing on statewide issues including education, agriculture, energy and mental health. Howard received a BA in Journalism from University of Massachusetts. He filed his first story with VPR in September 2015.

Ways to Connect

They dusty and yellowed, but the ink and pencil lettering was still legible: 90-year-old letters written by Laura Johnson to the love of her life, Harold White.
courtesy, Jennifer Carter

Whenever you start a construction project, you never know what you’ll find: Pull off a floor and there’s rot underneath; Go try to string some wire and there’s a joist in the way.

The Agency of Transportation says it is moving up the first inspections of the new, $60 million bridge replacements on I-91 in southern Vermont. The same company that designed the pedestrian bridge that collapsed two weeks ago in Miami also designed the bridges in Brattleboro.

Three silhouettes of pregnant women, each with a different hairstyle.
Ekaterina Bedoeva / iStock

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center has released an online "toolkit" to help doctors and nurses better serve mothers with substance abuse disorders and their babies.

A stretch of road with a mini cell tower on a utility pole that a car is driving by.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR/File

Vermont has been trying to get cell service into every corner of the state, and a few years ago, a new technology offered promise by mounting mini cell towers along utility poles.

But just last week the state learned that CoverageCo — the company that’s operating the cell system — is about to shut down after losing money on the experiment.

Frank Amato / courtesy, Eagle Times

You can’t just walk into Springfield High School: There's a camera trained on the front door — which is locked — all part of the school's security plan. And that's just the beginning.

The Department of Taxes posted notices on the doors of The Hermitage Monday after the company fialed to make payments on more than $1 million in back taxes it owes.
Courtesy, Vermont Department of Taxes

The state has shut down The Hermitage ski resort in Dover.

courtesy, Hermitage Club

The Vermont Department of Taxes on Thursday sent the Hermitage a notice that the company was “not in good standing,” with the state.

Allie Brown, a senior at Burlington High School, spoke at the rally. She urged her peers to call their state representatives about supporting a bill that would requre background checks for all gun purchases.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

While a number of planned walkouts were rescheduled Wednesday due to weather, rallies did take place across the state as part of a nationwide protest. 

The Cavendish community tapestry which shows a river, tree, gazebo and townspeople and says Cavendish 1761.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

A community art project in the tiny town of Cavendish was shown for the first time at this year's town meeting, but its longtime champion wasn't there to see it.

A group of female musicians, from the nations of Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan, are visiting our region to perform a new multimedia production based on the epic story 40 Girls, or Qyrq Qyz — an oral tale from the region that dates back centuries.

Bess Klassen-Landis

A group of actors that are putting on the play 1776 see a lot of connections between the work of our country's founders and the people who make decisions in their local communities at town meeting.

Some of the play's actors have been traveling around the Upper Valley to talk with people as they make their way into town meeting.

A clock at Four Corners in Bennington, pictured here in July 2014
Angela Evancie / VPR File

There could be a governmental shift coming to Bennington. On Town Meeting Day, voters will decide if the town should elect a mayor, instead of sticking with the town manager system that's currently in place.

A graph from the Drug Poisoning (Overdose) Fatalities Report released Thursday shows accidental deaths involving heroin and fetanyl in Vermont. The report notes that 2016 and 2017 data are preliminary. Find the report here: http://bit.ly/2CQH9Pm
Vermont Department of Health, Courtesy

The number of accidental overdose deaths in Vermont involving the synthetic drug fentanyl increased significantly last year, according to a new report.

Jared Cadwell, the Fayston selectboard chairman, holds papers at a desk and looks over the town's Town Meeting Day warning in the town's municpal building.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

If you take a quick scan at this year's Town Meeting Day warnings, you won't find too many ambitious projects that require long-term borrowing. Vermont town officials say ongoing debates in Washington and Montpelier are making it hard to plan too far into the future.

Brattleboro Memorial Hospital settled claims made under the federal False Claims Act.
Brattleboro Memorial Hospital / BMH

Vermont's U.S. Attorney says Brattleboro Memorial Hospital allegedly submitted bills to Medicare and Medicaid without the proper documentation.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The Agency of Natural Resources is poking holes in a report that says Saint-Gobain was not responsible for some of the PFOA contamination in Bennington.

Victoria Banerjee checks on a tank of wort, or unfermented beer, at Hermit Thrush Brewery in Brattleboro.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Vermont's craft brewers are asking lawmakers to update the state's franchise law because they say it unfairly benefits beer and wine distributors.

Nanci Leitch stands in the bedroom in her house in Guilford. There's a bed and a painting on the wall.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Lawmakers are debating a bill that would require people who use Airbnb, and other online short-term rental companies, to register with the state.

Tim Van Orden of Bennington wears a blue coat and runs on snowshoes through some snowy trees.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

This March, a national snowshoe race will make its way back to Vermont.

Snowshoe racing may not be in the Olympics (yet), but for one Bennington resident, the spectacle of hundreds of people racing through a winter wonderland on snowshoes just might be ready for primetime.

In a unanimous decision, the Public Utility Commission found that Vermont can regulate Voice over Internet Protocol service under federal law.
Ingram Publishing / Thinkstock

The Public Utility Commission says Vermont can regulate Voice over Internet Protocol, or VoIP, service.

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