Howard Weiss-Tisman

Reporter For Southern Vermont & The Connecticut River Valley

Howard Weiss-Tisman is VPR's reporter for Southern Vermont & the Connecticut River Valley. He worked at the Brattleboro Reformer for 11 years, reporting on most towns in the region and specializing on statewide issues including education, agriculture, energy and mental health. Howard received a BA in Journalism from University of Massachusetts. He filed his first story with VPR in September 2015.

Ways to Connect

The owner of Vermont Yankee says its wants to begin work soon to speed up the decommissioning of the shuttered nuclear reactor.

Melody Bodette / VPR

The Department of Public Service has rejected New Haven's energy plan.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Gov. Phil Scott says that he will proclaim Oct. 9, 2017 as Indigenous People's Day in Vermont. This is the same date on which the federal holiday Columbus Day falls this year.

The U.S. Department of Education has approved Vermont's state plan required under the Every Student Succeeds Act.

Gene Puskar / AP

State regulators say that Comcast has to provide more high definition access to Vermont's community TV stations, and build out its high-def network.

On Tuesday the cable giant filed a suit in federal court, challenging those conditions in its new state permit.

Jeb Wallace-Brodeur / Ski Vermont

The Vermont ski industry is worried about the Trump Administration's review of the J-1 visa exchange program which allows resorts to hire some foreign workers.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The state's largest slaughterhouse is about to get even bigger.

Vermont Packinghouse recently received an Act 250 permit for a $1 million expansion.

Georgia Mountain Wind

The Public Utility Commission is imposing new restrictions on the Georgia Mountain Community Wind project.

The state Agency of Education has published the wrong rules for special education services on its website.
GlenJ / iStockphoto.com

Special education departments across Vermont may have been using the wrong rules to guide decisions over what services children receive. That's because Agency of Education officials say the wrong draft of the state's special education rules were filed with the Secretary of State back in 2013.

The state wants to recognize important sites that contributed to the history of the equal rights movement.

The spent nuclear fuel at Vermont Yankee is being moved from the cooling pools, shown in this photo, into dry cask storage.
Toby Talbot / AP/file

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission says a new dry cask storage facility at Vermont Yankee passed a federal inspection.

A legislative committee has been meeting this summer to try to figure out how private schools that take public money should serve special education students.

Since Vermont started collecting data in 1994 the number of domestic violence related homicides, as a percentage of all homicides, has been dropping.

The U.S. Department of Education says Vermont has to give more information about how the state will measure student progress under the Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA.

Up until now the outdoor recreation businesses in Vermont have not had a statewide advocacy group. Governor Phil Scott signed an executive order creating a collaborative to support the industry.
John Atkinson / Vermont Mountain Bike Association

Recreation businesses involving activities such as skiing, hiking, mountain biking and boating bring a lot of money into Vermont. But until now there hasn't been an organized effort to bring all of those businesses together and possibly provide some organized state support.

Walt Cottrell  lives in Newbury and he delays haying on his property to try to protect bobolinks and other birds that nest in the high grass. Cottrell says the bobolinks disappeared from his property about ten years ago.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Vermont farmers are taking part in a regionwide effort to put off haying, when possible, to give grassland birds a better chance of surviving.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The Grafton Cornet Band is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year.

A dispute between Comcast and the state's public access TV stations could be headed to court.

The company that contaminated about 270 private wells in Bennington has dropped its pending lawsuits against the state over Vermont's safe drinking water standard for PFOA.

The Agency of Agriculture has reached a settlement agreement with a Springfield slaughterhouse that violated federal livestock handling standards.

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