Howard Weiss-Tisman

Reporter For Southern Vermont & The Connecticut River Valley

Howard Weiss-Tisman is VPR's reporter for Southern Vermont & the Connecticut River Valley. He worked at the Brattleboro Reformer for 11 years, reporting on most towns in the region and specializing on statewide issues including education, agriculture, energy and mental health. Howard received a BA in Journalism from University of Massachusetts. He filed his first story with VPR in September 2015.

Ways to Connect

Lisa Ford, left, and Willow O'Feral each started a women's health activist group following the election of Donald Trump. They are both now working with Planned Parenthood to improve access to abortion services in Windham County.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Two groups in Brattleboro are working with Planned Parenthood of Northern New England to improve abortion services in Windham County.

Hailshadow / iStock

A new report finds that the number of people who receive Social Security Disability Insurance, or SSDI, due to mental illness has been increasing.

This is the shortnose sturgeon that was recently caught in Vermont. Scientists aren't sure at the moment how the sturgeon got into the state.
NH Fish and Game and USGS, courtesy

An endangered fish was hooked recently in the Connecticut River near Vernon.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Two Townshend doctors are changing their practice over to a direct primary care model, where patients will pay a flat monthly fee for unlimited primary care. The Vermont doctors hope it will address the challenges of a changing health care insurance industry.

Putney Central School students make their way down into the school forest. Putney residents will vote on turning the forest over to the town before an Act 46 merger vote.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

In some Vermont school districts, the issues of assets and debt are complicating their Act 46 merger plans. In Putney, voters will weigh in on what to do with the Putney Central School Forest about a week before the district's Act 46 vote.

Green Mountain Power wants to build Vermont's second commercial renewable energy storage battery near its solar array in Panton.

Londonderry Rep. Oliver Olsen says he won't return to Montpelier in January.

Olsen, an independent, announced Sunday that he is resigning from the Vermont House due to his work schedule.

Vermont's independent schools say there might be a way to have more students with disabilities enrolled in their programs.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The Department of Motor Vehicles is considering adding a third option for people when they choose a gender to appear on their driver's license.

Christina Moore of Halifax, Vt. sits at her desk in San Juan where she is managing disaster relief, using software she developed.
Christina Moore, Courtesy

A Halifax resident who developed a software program to help with the federal disaster relief process is in Puerto Rico managing the relief effort there.

The Vermont Agency of Human Services is cutting about $500,000 that would have gone toward support services for the state's Reach Up program.

James Douglas is homeless and he says he panhandles around Brattleboro. Douglas says he has beeen collecting less money since the selectboard began a townwide dialogue on panhandling.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

A conversation in Brattleboro about panhandling has led to some tough debates over homelessness, mental illness, drug addiction, but there's still no consensus on what to do about people in the street asking for money.

screenshot from GoFundMe campaign

The shocking news from Las Vegas hit southwestern Vermont hard, after the community learned that a local woman was one of the 59 people killed at a country music concert Sunday.

Sandy Casey's family goes back generations in Dorset and Manchester. People in the area were reeling Tuesday as they came to grips with the fact that one of their own was taken away in the carnage that unfolded in Las Vegas.

A Bennington Superior Court Judge has approved the settlement between the state, and the company Saint-Gobain, over water contamination in Bennington.

According to a new report, 63 percent of those hosts are women; the average age of Airbnb host is 50 and 29 percent of the Airbnb hosts are over the age of 60.
Wachiwit / iStock

A newly issued legislative report says online home sharing services like Airbnb should be regulated locally. But one of the lawmakers who requested the study says oversight should happen on a statewide level.

The Bellows Falls Police Department arrested a man recently with about 1,000 bags of heroin in his car. Police Chief Ron Lake, pictured above, asked this year for a new officer to combat the heroin crisis but the voters rejected his request.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The Senate Government Operations Committee is holding a series of meetings across the state to look at how Vermont pays for and uses its law enforcement services.

The poet Robert Frost lived at this stone house in Shaftsbury for nine years. Bennington College will acquire and manage the property.
The Friends Of Robert Frost, courtesy

Bennington College will be taking over ownership of the Robert Frost Stone House Museum in Shaftsbury.

Brenda Thibault stands in front of her mobile home at St. George Villa, where the residents are looking into forming a cooperative to purchase the park.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

As Vermont sees a growing number of mobile home parks go on the market, some residents are turning toward cooperative ownership to take over control of the properties.

A screenshot of the Airbnb website, taken Sept. 20, shows some available rentals in Vermont. A Vermont working group is studying short-term rentals, prompting Airbnb to reach out to Vermont hosts registered on the site to share their experiences.
Screenshot from Airbnb.com

Airbnb says more than 3,600 people across the state use the online service to rent out their homes. Now the company is asking those homeowners to get involved with a statewide study that could impact the future of home sharing in Vermont.

Turnpike Road in Norwich was damaged during flash flooding this past summer. VPR's Howard Weiss-Tisman spoke to "Vermont Edition" about his recent stories looking at flood insurance.
Rebecca Sananes / VPR

Flooding is a serious business, and VPR's Howard Weiss-Tisman has been looking at the vital topic of flood insurance — which may not even continue to exist in its current form, with change occurring both in the climate and in Washington. He joins this Vermont Edition to talk about his reporting.

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