Howard Weiss-Tisman

Reporter For Southern Vermont & The Connecticut River Valley

Howard Weiss-Tisman is VPR's reporter for Southern Vermont & the Connecticut River Valley. He worked at the Brattleboro Reformer for 11 years, reporting on most towns in the region and specializing on statewide issues including education, agriculture, energy and mental health. Howard received a BA in Journalism from University of Massachusetts. He filed his first story with VPR in September 2015.

Ways to Connect

The poet Robert Frost lived at this stone house in Shaftsbury for nine years. Bennington College will acquire and manage the property.
The Friends Of Robert Frost, courtesy

Bennington College will be taking over ownership of the Robert Frost Stone House Museum in Shaftsbury.

Brenda Thibault stands in front of her mobile home at St. George Villa, where the residents are looking into forming a cooperative to purchase the park.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

As Vermont sees a growing number of mobile home parks go on the market, some residents are turning toward cooperative ownership to take over control of the properties.

A screenshot of the Airbnb website, taken Sept. 20, shows some available rentals in Vermont. A Vermont working group is studying short-term rentals, prompting Airbnb to reach out to Vermont hosts registered on the site to share their experiences.
Screenshot from

Airbnb says more than 3,600 people across the state use the online service to rent out their homes. Now the company is asking those homeowners to get involved with a statewide study that could impact the future of home sharing in Vermont.

Turnpike Road in Norwich was damaged during flash flooding this past summer. VPR's Howard Weiss-Tisman spoke to "Vermont Edition" about his recent stories looking at flood insurance.
Rebecca Sananes / VPR

Flooding is a serious business, and VPR's Howard Weiss-Tisman has been looking at the vital topic of flood insurance — which may not even continue to exist in its current form, with change occurring both in the climate and in Washington. He joins this Vermont Edition to talk about his reporting.

This drawing shows part of the plan developers have for The Putnam Block in downtown Bennington.
courtesy of Stevens &-Associates

A development group in Bennington says it's acquired a major downtown property that's part of a $50 million renovation project.

Members of the Windham Souitheast Supervisory Union Act 46 Committee goes over a presentation for the district's voters at a recent meeting.
Howard Weisss-Tisman / VPR

At the end of the last Legislative session lawmakers extended the deadlines for Act 46, the state's school district consolidation law. As the new Nov. 30 deadline approaches, districts are now finishing up their work and preparing for a new round of votes on the merger plans.

The U.S. Forest Service wants to increase camping fees at Grout Pond, and at other developed campgrounds in the Green Mountain National Forest.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The U.S. Forest Service is collecting public input on a plan to increase the fees at developed campgrounds in the Green Mountain National Forest.

The cost of providing emergency housing for the homeless continues to go up, despite the state's attempt to move away from paying for people to stay in motels.

The Public Utility Commission will investigate the business practices of a national solar energy company that opened its Vermont office in 2015.

Karin Hardy points to land along Ball Mountain Brook in Jamaica where her house stood before Tropical Storm Irene swept it away. Hardy's former house was not in the FEMA flood zone and she did not have flood insurance.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Karin Hardy says she never thought much about flood insurance before Tropical Storm Irene, but she learned a pretty tough lesson the Monday after the storm in 2011.

VPR/Melody Bodette

When the topic of insurance comes up, most people probably think about fender benders or trips to the emergency room before they think of flooding. But as scientists predict increasingly severe weather events in coming years, Vermonters will likely need to become better acquainted with it.

A Norwich home on Turnpike Road is inaccessible by road after its bridge and culvert were destroyed.
Rebecca Sananes / VPR

Even before Tropical Storm Harvey and Hurricane Irma hit, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) was in trouble — to the tune of $25 billion. And the program is set to expire at the end of the month if Congress doesn't act.

The state has asked the Bennington Superior Court to approve the agreement that it reached with Saint-Gobain over water that's contaminated with the industrial chemical PFOA.


The Vermont Housing and Conservation Board has been holding public hearings to gather input on where the state should spend the $35 million that lawmakers approved this year for affordable housing.

The owner of Vermont Yankee says its wants to begin work soon to speed up the decommissioning of the shuttered nuclear reactor.

Melody Bodette / VPR

The Department of Public Service has rejected New Haven's energy plan.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Gov. Phil Scott says that he will proclaim Oct. 9, 2017 as Indigenous People's Day in Vermont. This is the same date on which the federal holiday Columbus Day falls this year.

The U.S. Department of Education has approved Vermont's state plan required under the Every Student Succeeds Act.

Gene Puskar / AP

State regulators say that Comcast has to provide more high definition access to Vermont's community TV stations, and build out its high-def network.

On Tuesday the cable giant filed a suit in federal court, challenging those conditions in its new state permit.

Jeb Wallace-Brodeur / Ski Vermont

The Vermont ski industry is worried about the Trump Administration's review of the J-1 visa exchange program which allows resorts to hire some foreign workers.