Howard Weiss-Tisman

Reporter For Southern Vermont & The Connecticut River Valley

Howard Weiss-Tisman is VPR's reporter for Southern Vermont & the Connecticut River Valley. He worked at the Brattleboro Reformer for 11 years, reporting on most towns in the region and specializing on statewide issues including education, agriculture, energy and mental health. Howard received a BA in Journalism from University of Massachusetts. He filed his first story with VPR in September 2015.

Ways to Connect

The U.S. Department of Education says Vermont has to give more information about how the state will measure student progress under the Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA.

Up until now the outdoor recreation businesses in Vermont have not had a statewide advocacy group. Governor Phil Scott signed an executive order creating a collaborative to support the industry.
John Atkinson / Vermont Mountain Bike Association

Recreation businesses involving activities such as skiing, hiking, mountain biking and boating bring a lot of money into Vermont. But until now there hasn't been an organized effort to bring all of those businesses together and possibly provide some organized state support.

Walt Cottrell  lives in Newbury and he delays haying on his property to try to protect bobolinks and other birds that nest in the high grass. Cottrell says the bobolinks disappeared from his property about ten years ago.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Vermont farmers are taking part in a regionwide effort to put off haying, when possible, to give grassland birds a better chance of surviving.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The Grafton Cornet Band is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year.

A dispute between Comcast and the state's public access TV stations could be headed to court.

The company that contaminated about 270 private wells in Bennington has dropped its pending lawsuits against the state over Vermont's safe drinking water standard for PFOA.

The Agency of Agriculture has reached a settlement agreement with a Springfield slaughterhouse that violated federal livestock handling standards.

Aaron Brooke-deBock

A researcher at Middlebury College says the tick population has doubled, and in Rutland county the mosquito count is up by 30 percent. But down in southern Vermont there's an historic infestation of fungus gnats.

Gov. Phil Scott announced Tuesday that the state has reached a settlement with the company Saint-Gobain over the water contamination in Bennington.

The Department of Mental Health will hold two meetings this week as it works on a report that addresses the crisis in Vermont's mental health care system.

Lori Claffee is a member of the Union/Park Neighborhood Association which has been working to take back a neighborhood in Springfield. She is standing in front of a demolition site where a nuisance house was torn down.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Neighborhood activists, who are trying to clean up one of Springfield's toughest neighborhoods, say they'll only be able to tackle the problem one building at a time.

Victoria Quine leads a class during the New England Center for Circus Arts camp Wednesday.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The entire board of trustees of the New England Center for Circus Arts stepped down Wednesday. The board members announced their decisions late in the day after accepting the resignation of the embattled executive director Michael Helmstadter.

The town of Vernon voted Tuesday to leave the Brattleboro Union High School district.

Gov. Phil Scott says it would be possible to avoid a statewide property tax increase by mandating a higher student to staff ratio
skynesher / iStock

Vermont still has a lot of work to do to fully integrate technology into public school classrooms, according to the latest draft of the state's digital learning plan, put out by the Agency of Education.

The New England Center For Circus Arts' summer camp has been proceeding through the turmoil. About 6,000 people take lessons over the year.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The executive director and president of the board of directors agreed to step down from the leadership of New England Center for Circus Arts.

Serenity Smith Forchion, left, and her twin sister Elsie Smith started the New England Center for Circus Arts in Brattleboro. A volunteer board fired them this week.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

The New England Center For Circus Arts board of directors has fired the organization's founders, and supporters are rallying to their defense as the group faces an uncertain future.

Kay Curtis sets up the new childcare center at the Brattleboro Retreat which is for the children of opioid adicts who are receiving their treatment.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

There were 11 overdoses in Brattleboro over the Fourth of July weekend, and as eye-popping as that number is, officials who are dealing with the opioid crisis every day say they weren't surprised.

Howard Weisss-Tisman / VPR

Vermont grass-fed beef is in high demand, and if the market wants to continue to grow, there will have to be better collaboration in the industry.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Vermont’s Department of Disabilities, Aging and Independent Living says allowing adults with developmental disabilities to make more of their own decisions will help them to live independent and healthy lives.

The spent nuclear fuel at Vermont Yankee is being stored in dry casks on the property in Vernon.
Vermont Yankee, Courtesy

A company that specializes in the dismantling of nuclear reactors says it's signed a contract to take down Vermont Yankee in Vernon.

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