Howard Weiss-Tisman

Reporter For Southern Vermont & The Connecticut River Valley

Howard Weiss-Tisman is VPR's reporter for Southern Vermont & the Connecticut River Valley. He worked at the Brattleboro Reformer for 11 years, reporting on most towns in the region and specializing on statewide issues including education, agriculture, energy and mental health. Howard received a BA in Journalism from University of Massachusetts. He filed his first story with VPR in September 2015.

Ways to Connect

First and second grade students line up to wash their hands at Marlboro Elementary School.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Lawmakers want to change how the state’s small school grants are administered, and some of Vermont’s smallest schools say it would be tough to remain open if the annual payments were taken away.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

As The Hermitage resort in Wilmington struggles to emerge from its financial difficulties, others in the Deerfield Valley are worried about the ongoing effect of the resort’s closure.

AbleStock.com / Thinkstock

The percentage of one-and two-year-olds who had their blood tested for lead is down since 2014. And that’s caught the attention of doctors and public health officials.

Dr. Wendy Davis of Chittenden County has been working with the state to figure out why more doctors aren’t testing every one-and two-year old.

courtesy, Avangrid Renewables

A landowner who said his property was damaged by blasting at a nearby wind power facility has reached a settlement with developers.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

After a racially insensitive cartoon sparked a year-long discussion on inequality, the Upper Valley town of Hartford has released its plan for more fully embracing diversity in the community.

Facing a $58 million funding gap, Vermont lawmakers and the governor have competing proposals to pay for Vermont's schools in the final weeks of the legislative session.
Miatagirl / iStock

Legislative leaders say they will stick to the schedule for continuing the Act 46 school district consolidation process.

Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

A group of Upper Valley residents has taken up the call to “bring the cows, back” to Norwich Farm.

courtesy, Herve Pelletier

It was a busy morning in Windham County, as two communities tackled the issue of guns in schools.

A screenshot of the Agency of Education's Merger Activity map. See the latest merger map here: https://bit.ly/2pMFZ3E
Screenshot, Vermont Agency of Education

Rebecca Holcombe’s announcement Tuesday that she’ll be stepping down as Vermont’s Secretary of Education comes at a critical time in the Act 46 school district consolidation process.

A smartphone screen with a variety of travel app icons, including Airbnb in the center of the screen.
Wachiwit / iStock

The nation’s largest short-term rental company says it won’t fight a bill that would make Vermont the first to require people who rent out their homes to register with the state.

They dusty and yellowed, but the ink and pencil lettering was still legible: 90-year-old letters written by Laura Johnson to the love of her life, Harold White.
courtesy, Jennifer Carter

Whenever you start a construction project, you never know what you’ll find: Pull off a floor and there’s rot underneath; Go try to string some wire and there’s a joist in the way.

The Agency of Transportation says it is moving up the first inspections of the new, $60 million bridge replacements on I-91 in southern Vermont. The same company that designed the pedestrian bridge that collapsed two weeks ago in Miami also designed the bridges in Brattleboro.

Three silhouettes of pregnant women, each with a different hairstyle.
Ekaterina Bedoeva / iStock

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center has released an online "toolkit" to help doctors and nurses better serve mothers with substance abuse disorders and their babies.

A stretch of road with a mini cell tower on a utility pole that a car is driving by.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR/File

Vermont has been trying to get cell service into every corner of the state, and a few years ago, a new technology offered promise by mounting mini cell towers along utility poles.

But just last week the state learned that CoverageCo — the company that’s operating the cell system — is about to shut down after losing money on the experiment.

Frank Amato / courtesy, Eagle Times

You can’t just walk into Springfield High School: There's a camera trained on the front door — which is locked — all part of the school's security plan. And that's just the beginning.

The Department of Taxes posted notices on the doors of The Hermitage Monday after the company fialed to make payments on more than $1 million in back taxes it owes.
Courtesy, Vermont Department of Taxes

The state has shut down The Hermitage ski resort in Dover.

courtesy, Hermitage Club

The Vermont Department of Taxes on Thursday sent the Hermitage a notice that the company was “not in good standing,” with the state.

Allie Brown, a senior at Burlington High School, spoke at the rally. She urged her peers to call their state representatives about supporting a bill that would requre background checks for all gun purchases.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

While a number of planned walkouts were rescheduled Wednesday due to weather, rallies did take place across the state as part of a nationwide protest. 

The Cavendish community tapestry which shows a river, tree, gazebo and townspeople and says Cavendish 1761.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

A community art project in the tiny town of Cavendish was shown for the first time at this year's town meeting, but its longtime champion wasn't there to see it.

A group of female musicians, from the nations of Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan, are visiting our region to perform a new multimedia production based on the epic story 40 Girls, or Qyrq Qyz — an oral tale from the region that dates back centuries.

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