Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles.  Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

Ways To Connect

More than 46 million Americans are expected to travel some distance to get to Thanksgiving dinner this week. That's the most since before the great recession. And while the traffic and weather may not be cooperating, at least gas prices are down.

iStock Agency / Thinkstock

The Thanksgiving holiday weekend embodies a few big themes: a festive meal with family, perhaps a long car trip to get there, and time to reflect - sometimes uncomfortably - on our founding history that gave rise to Thanksgiving. Wednesday on Vermont Edition, we're taking all of it on!  From food to travel to history to culture, we'll get your Thanksgiving weekend started right.

Anthropology of a shared meal

The welfare of children under state supervision in Vermont has been under particular scrutiny over the last year. The homicide of two-year-old Dezirae Sheldon in February sparked outrage partly because Sheldon's family had previously been investigated for abuse. That anger was compounded last spring when another young child, Peighton Geraw, was killed; his family had also been in the Department for Children and Families system.

VanZandt / Flickr

You've got your favorite turkey recipe, your favorite pecan pie recipe, and your favorite side dish. But what wine do you serve to go along with all those dishes? What wine to you bring to your friend's house for the big dinner?

Don't feel stumped! Our wine experts are here to help. We'll talk to Kevin Clayton, owner of Village Wine and Coffee in Shelburne, and Keven Ring, wine director at Twin Farms Resort in Barnard, about how to choose the right wines for your holiday meals.

Angela Evancie / VPR

Sen. Bernie Sanders voted against the Keystone XL pipeline, and he supports President Obama's decision to protect some undocumented immigrants from deportation. Those are two of the issues we'll discuss with Sanders when he joins us on the next Vermont Edition. We'll also look at two of Sanders' priorities: addressing suicides among military veterans, and bringing down the prices of generic prescription drugs.

Broadcast live on Mon., Nov. 24 at noon; rebroadcast at 7 p.m.

Courtesy of Andy Knight Mitchell

“The one thing you're not supposed to do when filming sharks is to back up."

The first time Andy Mitchell swam with great white sharks proved to be quite an adventure. The Middlebury-based documentary filmmaker was in South Africa, in an area known as "Shark Alley." He and another cameraman had dropped a cage to the sea bottom and tipped it on its side like a soccer goal to provide some protection if an aggressive shark came at them.

“The weather was crap, and the visibility was horrible. You couldn’t see more than five or six feet. So I slowly edged out of the cage.”

Bennington College

Walk into a gallery space in Bennington right now and you'll be surrounded by a thirty-five foot long curved painting of a valley in Afghanistan outside Bagram air base. The gallery is filled with sounds from the bazaar's and villages in the valley. Interviews with local Afghans hang on the walls. It's an immersive, complicated portrait of a complicated place created by an anthropologist and an artist working together as a team.

Chooseco Publishing

Many readers fondly remember the childhood joy and suspense brought by the Choose Your Own Adventure books. This series allowed young readers to make choices throughout the book that changed the story slightly, finishing with one of up to 14 different endings.

CJ Gunther / AP

When the notice arrives that you've been selected for jury duty, some people wonder, "Why me?". Others look at it as their civic duty and as an opportunity to see the court system in action.

We speak with Stephanie Limoge, jury coordinator for the Vermont's Jury Administration Office, and Attorneys David Sleigh and Ritch Berger and Addison County State's Attorney Dave Fenster to get an idea of how people get picked for duty, how they might get out of serving and what goes into lawyers' decisions on who should sit in the jury on their case.

Swann Auction Galleries

A sizeable collection of original Revolutionary War era documents will be up for auction on Thursday at Swann Auction Galleries in New York. Several autographed items in the group have historical importance to Vermont, including an original copy of the document announcing statehood in 1791, signed by Thomas Jefferson.


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