Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles.  Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

Ways to Connect

Jane Lindholm / VPR

Those swaying plants with the yellow flowers you see along roadsides or maybe even on your property this time of year may look benign, but they could be dangerous if what you're seeing is wild parsnip. Also referred to as "poison parsnip," the Vermont Department of Health and Agency of Agriculture recently sent out a warning to Vermonters that the sap from this plant can cause severe skin reactions.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

Vermont's primary election is now just a couple of weeks away. VPR wanted to understand what you know and think about those seeking national and statewide office. And what your opinions are about key issues facing the state.

Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

Vermont's delegates at the DNC spent Tuesday morning reflecting on whether to follow Bernie Sanders' exhortation to back Hillary Clinton. But a breakfast meeting with fellow Vermonter Howard Dean didn't move the Sanders faithful off of their stance.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

A year ago in August, Vermonters were horrified at the public murder of a social worker, Lara Sobel, in downtown Barre. Among the witnesses who intervened that day was Scott Williams, the Washington County state's attorney, who knew both Sobel and the woman accused in her murder.

John Locker / AP

Flash back to late May 2015 when Bernie Sanders announced to 5,000 Vermont supporters and to the world that he was launching a run for the Presidency as a Democrat. Political pundits could be excused for their skepticism that an independent Democratic Socialist U.S. Senator from one of the smallest states in the country could have any success.

John Locher / AP

The Republican National Convention ended last night, and the main event on the final evening was the speech by nominee Donald Trump. VPR's John Dillon has spent the week with the Vermont delegates at the RNC in Cleveland. Before flying home, Dillon spoke to Vermont Edition and shared reactions to Trump's speech.

Some Vermont attorneys have been doing pro bono work representing detainees in the U.S. military prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. This week, attorneys David Sleigh and Robert Gensburg were informed that their client Abdul Zahir has been cleared for release, 14 years after he was imprisoned in the controversial facility.

Samuil Levitch / iStock

At this point in your life, you've sat through enough wedding toasts to know the good from the bad. So why are you still hearing so many cringe-inducing toasts that make the bride blush and send the parents of the groom ducking for cover?

Jane Lindholm / VPR

Seven-year old Sawyer wants to know: how does an engine work? We learn about chainsaws from Ashleigh Belrose, an instructor the Center for Technology in Essex, Vermont.

Toby Talbot / AP

Debate continues over what state officials knew when about the alleged EB-5 fraud in the Northeast Kingdom.  Four guests join us today to discuss the situation.

University of Toronto / Flickr

Vermont prides itself on being out in front on a lot of issues. That includes prohibition, which was enacted in 1852, 70 years before the federal law prohibiting the sale of alcohol. Vermont's temperance lasted until 1902.

Annie Russell / VPR

A spotlight has been put on discussions of race and racism in our country as headlines fill with news of more violence - killings of black men by police, and recently the killing of police officers themselves in Dallas and Baton Rouge. We're focusing in on the conversations we need to have about race here in our own state, and how we can move forward.

John Van Hoesen / VPR

Even as it's under construction, the natural gas pipeline in Addison County continues to draw criticism for its price tag and environmental impact. Monday on Vermont Edition, we talk with Don Rendall, the president and CEO of Vermont Gas, and with one of the pipeline’s top critics, AARP Vermont State Director Greg Marchildon.

Marco Vasini / AP/file

Vermont foodies will argue that it's worth paying a higher price for premium food products. But even then, how do you know that what's promised on the label is what you're actually getting?

Kerstin Joensson / AP

For more than 35 years, the Vermont Mozart Festival enthralled audiences with a series of outdoor concerts, but it folded under significant debt in 2010. Now a local violinist has decided to bring it back with a new business model. 

Jim Cole / AP

On Tuesday morning in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders made an announcement that many people have been waiting for. He endorsed rival Hillary Clinton for the nomination.

Courtesy of Peter Graves

In addition to the many athletes preparing for a big trip to Rio de Janeiro for the 2016 Summer Olympics next month, there is a small army of other people who will also be making the trek, including coaches, trainers, health care workers and journalists. Among the Vermonters going is sports broadcaster Peter Graves of Thetford. He'll be doing live PA announcing at some of the Rio events.

iStock

Last year, fewer babies were born in Vermont than any other year since before the Civil War. How do Vermonters decide if and when to have kids? 

Nina Keck / VPR

Refugees from war-torn Syria wait in camps for permanent homes. One of the places being consider is Rutland, Vermont.

But the debate over whether to accept 100 Syrian refugees there has divided the city between those ready to welcome them and those who have serious misgivings about the move.

weerapatkiatdumrong / istock

Families grow and change. What does that feel like? We asked kids to tell us about their families, and we speak with author Amy Bloom about how love is not something that needs to be divided up, like a pie, but can expand and multiply.

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