Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

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The prospects for legalization of marijuana face a big moment this week: the Vermont House will take up a floor debate over whether to legalize possession of some amounts of pot in Vermont.

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The effects of a mental illness almost always stretch beyond just one person. Being the family member of someone with a mental health condition comes with unique challenges, and providing support to a struggling loved one can be both draining and heartbreaking.

Law enforcement officers increasingly find themselves interacting with people in the midst of a mental health crisis.

A state law now requires all officers to get eight hours of training in how to deal with these kinds of situations. There's also an additional voluntary program some officers have enrolled in that is designed to train mental health workers and the police in how to work together in an emergency.

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It's not easy to watch anyone struggle with mental health issues, but it might be even more difficult to see children battle mental illness. According the National Institute of Mental Health, half of all lifetime cases of mental illness begin by age 14.

One thing common to many people with mental health conditions is that they can be helped by a strong support network of friends and family. But keeping those folks in the loop can be hard. And if doctors are involved, things can be complicated by a strict federal privacy law known as HIPAA.

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Why is mental health so hard to talk about? If conditions like depression, anxiety, or even schizophrenia can have such massive impacts on people's lives, why can it feel like weakness to get help? We're continuing our week of mental health coverage by focusing in on the stigma around mental health, and how to move past it.

Copley Hospital

People who are suffering psychiatric episodes can end up in the emergency rooms of community hospitals, where doctors and nurses say they are not equipped to provide the treatment these patients need. As Vermont Edition begins a week-long exploration of mental health care in Vermont, we look at the problem of emergency psychiatric care.

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Why are there so many plants? How are seeds made? How does germination work? How can plants grow so big if they start from such a small seed? Why are flowers different colors? Why are plants and trees green? Where does dirt come from? In this episode of But Why, we're talking about plants with garden consultant Charlie Nardozzi.

Glass bottle of maple syrup laying down; nearby a spoon drizzles maple syrup into a small glass filled with syrup.
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There are many ways to cook with maple syrup, although not all ideas or methods are necessarily good ones.

John Locker / AP

Sen. Bernie Sanders has a packed two-day schedule Thursday and Friday as he travels around his home state to meet-and-greet with Vermonters and hold two town hall sessions. This kind of face-time with citizens in Vermont has become rarer in the last two years since Sanders ramped up a run for president and rose to prominence in national politics.

Andy Nash, meteorologist in charge of the National Weather Service in Burlington, talked with  Vermont Edition live during the noon hour on Wednesday to provide some totals and historical context for the snowstorm the region has been experiencing.

Ric Cengeri / VPR

When it comes to bodies of water, your big boys in Vermont are Lake Champlain, Lake Memphremagog, and the Connecticut River. The rest of the state is pretty much in the watershed of these three. So when it comes to clean water, all of our waterways are interconnected.

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Across the state on Town Meeting Day last week, voters signed off on - or rejected - their local school budgets. We're looking at the level of education spending in Vermont, and where that money goes. 

Lying down infant grasps an adult's finger.
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Four states – California, Rhode Island, New Jersey and New York – have approved state-run paid family and medical leave programs. Vermont currently has bills in both the House and Senate that would legislate it here.

NASA/JPL-Caltech

The discovery of seven new planets that could contain life has kids and adults pretty excited. We can't get to these planets yet but we do have tools to explore planets closer to home.

In this episode, St. Michael's College astronomy professor John O'Meara answers how the Mars rover is driven from back here on earth?

Candace Page headshot.
Courtesy

Vermont reporter Candace Page, who spent more than 30 years at the Burlington Free Press, was inducted into the New England Newspaper Hall of Fame in February. 

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Vermont is rife with cozy coffee shops, skilled baristas, and experienced coffee roasters. Coffee is truly engrained in the culture of Vermont.

Last year, the Vermont Agency of Education released its "Best Practices for Schools Regarding Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Students." The agency recently reissued those guidelines after President Trump rescinded an Obama order compelling public schools to let students use restrooms that conform to their gender identity, not their biological sex.

Jim Lo Scalzo / AP

President Trump spoke to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday night, and we'll hear reactions to what he said on Wednesday's Vermont Edition.

Person's hands grabbing a car steering wheel.
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It might be the most difficult ride of your life. You're in the car with your aging parent at the wheel and it becomes glaringly obvious that their driving skills have diminished. Possibly to the point of being dangerous to them and to others on the road.

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