Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound. In 2016 she started the nationally recognized But Why, which takes questions from kids all over the world and finds interesting people to answer them.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service. Her hobbies include photography, nature writing and wandering the woods and fields of New England. She lives in Monkton.

A bill proposing new regulations on toxic substances was vetoed by Gov. Phil Scott, but lawmakers are voting again and could override the veto.
Antoine2K / iStock

Live call-in discussion: New regulations for toxic substances—and a new agency to enforce them—passed both the House and Senate, but the bill was vetoed by Gov. Scott. Now lawmakers are working on a possible veto override. We're looking at what the bill could mean for Vermont, the reasons behind the governor's veto, and the prospect of a possible override. 

Ethan Chandra has a condition called heterotaxy, and has gone through five heart surgeries before age 4.
Courtesy / The Chandra Family

After hearing our episode about hearts, 3yo Ethan Chandra, from Middlesex, NJ, wanted to share the story of his own heart. In this podcast extra, Ethan and his 5yo sister Zoe and their mother, Ali, talk about what it's been like for Ethan to live with a condition called heterotaxy.

Vermont State trooper cars parked.
Steve Zind / VPR file

Vermont State Police are emphasizing less-lethal weapons and tactics as they review their use-of-force procedures, as well as the policies that dictate when and how officers return to the job after critical incidents. But while some new weapons, tools and administrative changes have already been adopted, the policies surrounding use of force are still being reviewed.

ansonsaw / iStock

In his 2014 State of the State address, Gov. Peter Shumlin highlighted the severity and far-reaching impact of Vermont's opioid crisis. Four years later, the state is still struggling with the deadly effects of that crisis. We're talking to Vermonters who have lived with addiction and are now in recovery, to hear their thoughts on the topic.

Rotor rust, tire tread, and other common issues could be eligible for advisory warnings under the DMV's updated vehicle inspection manual.
PxHere (left), Pixabay (middle), MeganLynnette via Flickr (right)

Vermont vehicle inspections went electronic last year, and while the rules for road-worthiness never changed, many reported headaches and failed inspections. Now the DMV's rules are getting an update. We're talking about the new inspection rules and what it means for Vermont drivers.

Norwich University senior Joshua Sassi's research on the Western Fence Lizard earned him an invitation to a national event for undergraduate researchers.
Sean Markey / Norwich University

Joshua Sassi is a senior biology major at Norwich University whose thesis work explores how the malaria parasite affects the Western Fence Lizard. His findings could shed light on how the parasite spreads in humans, which earn him a spot at Posters on the Hill, a Washington, D.C. event where the nation's top undergraduate researchers share their findings with Congress.

The Rutland Herald was founded in 1794 and is one of the oldest continually published papers in the country.
Nina Keck / VPR File

As charges of "fake news" keep flying, and many local newsrooms continue to dwindle, how much do Americans trust media outlets as sources of information and analysis? We're talking about the state of trust in the news media - both national and local - and how it affects how we form opinions and participate in our democracy. 

Opponents and supporters of Vermont's new gun laws made thier voices heard at Gov. Scott's public signing of the bills into law.
Chip Allen / Times Argus

Gov. Phil Scott has signed three gun control measures into law, the first such rules for Vermont. We want to hear your thoughts on these laws and how you think they'll shape Vermont. 

BahadirTanriover / istock

How does your heart keep you alive? How does it pump blood? Why is blood so important? Why do children have heart surgeries? Why is a baby's heartbeat faster before it's born? Why does blood rush to your head when you're upside down? Why can you feel your heart in your head when you're lying still or under water? In this episode of But Why, we're going talking about a very special muscle! It keeps us alive and it has its own special rhythm: the heart. Pediatric cardiologist Dr. Jane Crosson from Johns Hopkins Hospital answers questions about the heart.

The spotted salamander adds a colorful dash to the Vermont outdoors. And now is a great time of year to see them.
JasonOndreicka / iStock

As the temperatures slowly climb northward, you're about to see a lot of movement outside. Especially if you look really closely at the spring migration of reptiles and amphibians.

From 1854 to 1929, poor and homeless orphans and foundlings from major U.S. cities were trained to rural parts of the country.
Kansas State Historical Society, courtesy

How did you or your family first come to Vermont? Maybe your family traces its history beyond memory. Perhaps you’re a transplant who remembers the first footstep in the Green Mountain State. St. Michael's College professor emeritus Daniel Bean has researched the unique history of a small group of Vermonters: orphans and foundlings rounded up in major cities and brought here on what he calls "orphan trains."

Social media images and tweets of "Ricky Vaugh" were revealed to be by Vermont-native and Middlebury grad Douglass Mackey.
Facebook/Twitter

Twitter user Ricky Vaughn has been called "Trump’s most influential white nationalist troll." The account drew attention during the 2016 presidential election for political (and often white nationalist and anti-Semitic) posts. Huffington Post reporter Luke O'Brien found the man behind the handle is Waterbury native and Middlebury graduate Douglass Mackey.

What's blockchain? The unqiue computer network is a new piece of financial technology that Vermont lawmakers believe offers big opportunities for the state.
MF3d / iStock

Bitcoin. Cryptocurrency. These and other buzzwords make headlines in the world of finance, but underlying it all is a new piece of financial technology called blockchain. And state lawmakers are betting this new technology could be Vermont's next moneymaker, much like the state's captive insurance market.

The Vermont Legislature is looking for ways to shift the educational fund burden from property taxes to income taxes. H.911 includes legislation that would spell out how that can be accomplsihed.
ParkerDeen / iStock

Ask any legislator in Montpelier and they'll probably agree that getting the state's education funding model right could be their most difficult task. Now a bill passed by the House sets about shifting some of the burden of paying for our schools from property taxes to income taxes.

Vermont's psychiatrist shortage is making it hard for people to get the care that they need.
vadimguzhva / iStock

Vermont's shortage of psychiatrists means it can be incredibly difficult for people to get the mental health care they need. We're talking about the problem, the impact and possible solutions.

Greg Sharrow, right, interviews Burmese weaving instructor True Tender Htun as she demonstrators the use of homemade looms she used in Burma and now in Vermont.
Vermont Folklife Center, courtesy

The idea of “folklore” may conjure stories we tell children about mythical creatures, explanations of unique family traditions, or even mysteries of the natural world. But for Greg Sharrow, folklore was how people forged a sense of who they are. 

Sharrow dedicated three decades of work with the Vermont Folklife Center to documenting, celebrating, and illuminating folklore and folk arts in Vermont. He died Monday, April 2.

"Super Troopers 2" is being released on April 20.
Courtesy Fox Searchlight

What may be the best-known movie set in our state features syrup-chugging Vermont state troopers and several mustaches. Now, after 17 years, it has a sequel. We're talking to three members of the Broken Lizard comedy troupe, the stars of Super Troopers, and now, Super Troopers 2.

A February 1798 political cartoon portraying Matthew Lyon (holding tongs) attacking Connecticut Congressman Roger Griswold. After Griswold called Lyon a scoundrel, Lyon spat on Griswold's face and their brawl ensued.
Library of Congress American Cartoon Prints Collection / Wikimedia Commons

Vermont history buffs may know the name Matthew Lyon, but a Burlington singer-songwriter hopes to make the rowdy Vermont statesman more of a household name by making him the focus of a full-length musical.

Vermont's small colleges and universities face growing challenges as enrollment drops across the state and region.
Photobuay / iStock

College enrollment is down across New England. We're looking at how Vermont's small private and state colleges are adjusting to fewer students, rising costs, and growing competition for tuition dollars.

Melody A / iStock

Why do we laugh? Why do you feel ticklish when someone tickles you? Why can't you tickle yourself? We learn about how humor develops with Gina Mireault of the Infant Laughter Project at Northern Vermont University.

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