Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles.  Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

Ways To Connect

John Dillon / VPR

How many times has the sight of long antennae, a shiny exoskeleton or a frenetically flying insect prompted the phrase, "What is that?!"

Christophe Boisson / Thinkstock

There is a long history of military engagements between the United States and Canada, including secret full-scale invasion plans from as recent as the '20s and '30s.

Vermont Edition spoke to author Kevin Lippert about these plans, and his new book, War Plan Red: The United States' Secret Plan to Invade Canada and Canada's Secret Plan to Invade the United States.

One of the few Abenaki speakers in the world is Jesse Bowman Bruchac of Saratoga Springs, New York, and he's worked for most of his adult life to teach and preserve Abenaki.  "Every language holds within it an entire understanding of the world," says Bruchac. "When we lose a language, we've lost some of the diversity of human thought."

FikMik / iStock

"Kwai!" is an Abenaki greeting that even fewer people are going to understand in upcoming years. Language is constantly evolving, just as humans do. However, this means that as some languages become more dominant, others come to an end.

Dan Cardon / New Moran

On the edge of Burlington's waterfront, away from the boathouse and the ECHO Lake Aquarium, next to the sailing center, is a three-tiered squat brick building known as the Moran Plant, where a new group of inspired developers is trying to drum up both excitement and money for what they see as the future home of a great community gathering point. 

Toby Talbot / AP

Vermont's solar boom is here, and it's only getting bigger. The state's push for renewable energy means more solar projects, of many different scales, coming down the line. And there's a lot left to work out, on many fronts.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Every year in June, the Vermont Department of Health starts collecting mosquitoes at various locations around the state. The vials of mosquitoes then travel to Burlington where they're tested for Eastern Equine Encephalitis and West Nile Virus.

Andy Loveridge / Wildlife Conservation Research Unit via AP

The killing of Cecil the lion by an American big game hunter in Zimbabwe has enraged many people on social media. It also raises questions about the legal protections and social norms around hunting and poaching wild animals.

A Vermont corporation is playing a role in bringing a much-talked about Tesla product to market. The Dynapower Company, based in South Burlington, is making energy storage inverters for Tesla's Powerpack battery system.

J. David Bohl / Shelburne Museum

In 1839, Bennington cabinet-maker Hastings Kendrick placed an advertisement in the Vermont Gazette. His tagline? "Rich and tasty furniture." The Shelburne Museum used that phrase as the title for their big new exhibit: "Rich and Tasty: Vermont Furniture to 1850."

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