Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

PinkBadger / iStock

Is it actually possible to end homelessness in Vermont? A new report prepared for the legislature looks at whether the state is on the right track in tackling the problem, and maps out what it would take to make homelessness a thing of the past.

Neustockimages / iStock.com

The general assumption has been that the higher the student loan debt, the more likely for a young adult to "boomerang" back to their parents' house. According to a recent study though, it's a more complicated than that.

Eric Draper / AP

It all seemed so easy when you could trust your daily news sources. And for the edgier, sensationalized reports, you grabbed the supermarket tabloid. This was real, that was fake.

Matthew Otero / AP File

F-35 fighter jets are expected to be delivered to Vermont in 2019, but as President-elect Donald Trump mentioned in his press conference last week, there have been cost overruns and scheduling delays in the production of the fighter jet.

Olga R. Rodriguez / AP

Marches are planned in Washington and across the country this week as Donald Trump takes office. In Vermont, simultaneous protests against Trump are also being organized. We're talking about the history of political protest: what forms it has taken and what it can accomplish.

Photo courtesy Lake Champlain Basin Program

One-point-three billion dollars. That's the total amount the state thinks it needs to clean up Lake Champlain and other waterways over the next 20 years.  So where does the money come from? The Treasurer's Office has just released a report that maps out how to raise most of that funding.

Angela Evancie / VPR/file

Bill Sorrell served as Vermont's attorney general from 1997 until just a couple of days into 2017, when new Attorney General T.J. Donovan took office.

Meg Malone / VPR

During each legislative session, there are some in Montpelier getting their first taste of statewide politics. That's the case for two new lawmakers from Brookfield this year: Democrat Rep. Jay Hooper and independent Rep. Ben Jickling.

Joshua Brown / UVM

That map that was hung at the front of your grade school classroom included one large land mass close to Canada and the United States that went virtually ignored. There it was to the north and the east and covered with ice. Yes, Greenland.

ZarkoCvijovic/iStock

Why is all of the world split up into countries, states, cities and counties and more? Why can't we all just live as one big group? Which country has the least amount of people? We're talking about countries and borders with author Juan Enriquez. Also in this episode: why don't school buses have seatbelts?

Angela Evancie / VPR

The Vermont Legislature is back in session. We spent Wednesday checking in with the House. Now, we'll give the Senate a nod.

Meg Malone / VPR/file

On Wednesday,  an era begins in Vermont state government when the new Legislature convenes, and new leadership takes over in the House and Senate.  Vermont Edition is broadcasting live from the ornate Cedar Creek Room at the Statehouse for the opening day of the Legislature.

Jim Cole / AP

New Hampshire's legislative session opens this week, and Republican Chris Sununu will be sworn in as the state's new governor on Thursday.

Stefanamer / iStock

When it's time to renew your driver's license, there is that one question you have to answer about whether you agree to have your vital organs used upon your death to save some else's life.

Steve Zind / VPR

There's an idealized image of agriculture that has animals, the environment, food and farmers themselves thriving in a balanced ecosystem.

Courtesy, Taza Chocolate

How is chocolate made? Why can't we eat chocolate all the time? Why does chocolate melt? Why can't dogs eat chocolate? In this episode, we travel to Taza Chocolate in Somerville, Massachusetts to get some answers. Plus, we visit a coffee roaster in Maine to learn about this parent fuel that so many kids find gross!

Christopherarndt / iStock

When a forest floor or an open meadow is covered in snow, there is a magical story being written on that blank slate. It's a ballet of movement by voles, fishers, otters, deer, and raptors.

Angela Evancie / VPR File

Peter Shumlin first became governor in January of 2011. We're looking back at his time in office with a panel of Vermont political reporters.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR file

Six years ago, Peter Shumlin became the new governor of Vermont. His three-term tenure was marked by natural disaster and major policy debates over health care and energy. We look back on Shumlin's time in the governor's office in a live, hour-long interview.

Triangle Square Books for Young Readers / Seven Stories Press

Two celebrated Vermont artists have come together to address a very delicate problem: how to help kids understand and cope with death, and grieving the loss of someone they love. Author Julia Alvarez and woodblock artist Sabra Field are collaborators on the new book Where Do They Go?

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