Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles.  Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

Ways To Connect

Sen. Bernie Sanders voted against the Keystone XL pipeline, and he supports President Obama's decision to protect some undocumented immigrants from deportation. Those are two of the issues we'll discuss with Sanders when he joins us on the next Vermont Edition.

Post your questions and comments below or email vermontedition@vpr.net

Broadcast live on Mon., Nov. 24 at noon; rebroadcast at 7 p.m.

“The one thing you're not supposed to do when filming sharks is to back up."

The first time Andy Mitchell swam with great white sharks proved to be quite an adventure. The Middlebury-based documentary filmmaker was in South Africa, in an area known as "Shark Alley." He and another cameraman had dropped a cage to the sea bottom and tipped it on its side like a soccer goal to provide some protection if an aggressive shark came at them.

“The weather was crap, and the visibility was horrible. You couldn’t see more than five or six feet. So I slowly edged out of the cage.”

Walk into a gallery space in Bennington right now and you'll be surrounded by a thirty-five foot long curved painting of a valley in Afghanistan outside Bagram air base. The gallery is filled with sounds from the bazaar's and villages in the valley. Interviews with local Afghans hang on the walls. It's an immersive, complicated portrait of a complicated place created by an anthropologist and an artist working together as a team.

Many readers fondly remember the childhood joy and suspense brought by the Choose Your Own Adventure books. This series allowed young readers to make choices throughout the book that changed the story slightly, finishing with one of up to 14 different endings.

When the notice arrives that you've been selected for jury duty, some people wonder, "Why me?". Others look at it as their civic duty and as an opportunity to see the court system in action.

We speak with Stephanie Limoge, jury coordinator for the Vermont's Jury Administration Office, and Attorneys David Sleigh and Ritch Berger and Addison County State's Attorney Dave Fenster to get an idea of how people get picked for duty, how they might get out of serving and what goes into lawyers' decisions on who should sit in the jury on their case.

A sizeable collection of original Revolutionary War era documents will be up for auction on Thursday at Swann Auction Galleries in New York. Several autographed items in the group have historical importance to Vermont, including an original copy of the document announcing statehood in 1791, signed by Thomas Jefferson.


LGBTQ In VT

Nov 18, 2014

A new study from the Human Rights Campaign rates cities around the country for LGBT equality. They looked at things like non-discrimination laws, relationship recognition and municipality employment policies. Burlington rates pretty highly, as you might imagine, but other towns in Vermont do not fare so well.

Keen-eared public radio listeners noticed that Morning Edition sounded a little different today. NPR made behind-the-scenes changes to what we in radio call the "broadcast clock."
 

Broadcasters are somewhat obsessed with time. Adding and subtracting seconds in order to make a broadcast time out just perfectly is part of the rhythm of radio.

We asked our Morning Edition Producer Melody Bodette and Programming Director Franny Bastian to explain how they blend together VPR News and NPR News to give you one complete broadcast of Morning Edition.

If you're rushed to the hospital in Burlington this week, you won't be going to Fletcher Allen Health Care. Instead, you'll be driven up the hill to the University of Vermont Medical Center. It's the same place; it just has a different name. But there's more to it than just a change in name. John Brumsted is president and CEO of what's now called the University of Vermont Medical Center and the University of Vermont Health Network. And he filled us in on what's behind the name change.

 

The latest iteration of the Farm Bill created an insurance program for dairy farmers that takes milk prices and the prevailing feed costs into account. And the deadline to sign up for the insurance is just a few weeks away.

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