Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

Rex Butt is the interim executive director of the Pride Center of Vermont.
Pride Center of Vermont, courtesy

After just five months on the job at the Pride Center of Vermont, executive director Susan Hartman abruptly stepped down in early October.

Volunteer and board member Rex Butt has stepped in to lead the organization in the interim, and he said turmoil within the local LGBTQ community contributed to Hartman's swift departure.

Allegations have come to light against Harvey Weinstein of decades of sexual misconduct. We're hosting a discussion about sexual assault and harassment.
Vince Bucci / AP

The uncovering of decades of alleged sexual assault by Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein is spurring widespread discussion. There's revulsion, but also - recognition. "Me too," say thousands of women. We're talking about what that means - and what can be done about a culture of violence and pervasive misogyny.

We look at the economic and environmental viability of electric vehicles in a rural state like Vermont.
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There are some positive virtues of electric vehicles, like reducing carbon emissions created by conventional gas-powered engines. But where does the money meet the road?

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This episode of But Why is a serious one. We're talking about death. Why do people die when they get too old? What happens to people when they die? What does it feel like when you're dead? Our guide is Jana DeCristofaro from the Dougy Center: The National Center for Grieving Children in Portland, Oregon, which supports children and families facing serious illness or coping with the loss of a family member.

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Librarian and privacy advocate Jessamyn West was outraged when she heard about the massive data breach affecting 134 million people at credit reporting agency Equifax. So the Randolph librarian decided to sue the multi-billion dollar company in Vermont Small Claims Court.

As the country struggles with the opioid crisis, we're talking about pain management with a local expert.
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As the state and the country struggle with the opioid crisis, there is a renewed public focus on the treatment of pain. We're talking with a top local expert about the full landscape of pain management - opioids, but also other methods of treatment - and how doctors balance risk and benefit. 

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The state's most populous city is facing some critical issues, including homelessness and affordable housing.

We hear from Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger about these and other issues, like proposed downtown redevelopment, the sale of Burlington Telecom, and the future of Memorial Auditorium.

"Vermont Edition" looks at how new carve-outs to contraceptive coverage could affect Vermonters.
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President Donald Trump has announced a plan for new carve-outs to contraceptive coverage that were previously mandated by the Affordable Care Act. We look at how this change could affect Vermont, including the state law that includes coverage for vasectomies.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, pictured here on Capitol Hill after a news conference announcing his "Medicare for All" Act on Sept. 13,  joins "Vermont Edition" to talk about his "College for All" plan in advance of his town meeting at Castleton University.
Andrew Harnik / Associated Press

Sen. Bernie Sanders is promoting legislation that would make public colleges and universities tuition-free, and he will be holding a town meeting at Castleton University on Tuesday, Oct. 10 to outline the plan and a college fair there on Oct. 14.

Now that autumn is here, it's time for the fall bird show. One thing we'll talk about is why some people are worried that they  haven't been seeing as much activity at their birdfeeders this year.
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Autumn is officially upon us yet again, which means it's time for another fall bird show on Vermont Edition.

What's the best thing that happened to you this week? Sam Sanders asks listeners of his show that question, and now we've invited Sam on "Vermont Edition" to put this question out to our listeners.
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The news has been really difficult to process lately, and people are understandably searching for good in the world. Vermont Edition invites listeners to come together and share the things that have still managed to make them smile in the past few days.

Across the country, about 300,000 young people get concussions playing high school sports each year. Schools have developed plans to get athletes back into school and sports after a head injury.
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The high school sports season is in full swing and that means a lot of fun, but also the potential for injury. Across the country, about 300,000 young people get concussions playing high school sports each year. How do coaches, players and families balance the desire to play with the need to stay safe?

Vermont prides itself on a history of leadership on civil rights issues, but it doesn't mean that there aren't complications — many of them — to the narrative of Vermont's unbroken civil rights leadership.

It's American Archives Month, and former state archivist Gregory Sanford talked to us to illuminate some of the complications he's unearthed through his research in the Vermont state archives.

We're talking to a couple of the people behind a new UVM production of a play dealing with issues of incarceration and the death penalty in America.
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The Exonerated tells the story of six death row inmates who were wrongfully convicted and later had their convictions overturned and were released. We're talking to the director and an actor from a new production of the play at the University of Vermont. We'll discuss the play itself and the big issues it explores around incarceration and the justice system.

In this 'But Why' episode - originally released in June 2016 - we look at how to talk to kids about violence in the news.
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In the wake of the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history in Las Vegas on Sunday, we're re-releasing our special episode for parents. We speak with Dr. Robin Gurwitch about how to answer questions children may have about violence they hear in the news. She’s a child psychologist at the Duke University Medical Center and she has served on numerous commissions and committees about children and trauma, including the National Advisory Committee on Children and Disasters.

As we learn more details about what happened last night in Las Vegas, you may be overwhelmed by your own heartbreak, fear, and anxiety. And it’s very difficult to know how to address what’s happening—or shield—the news from your children.

Title IX is often credited with getting more girls involved in sports, but there's another, more intimate milestone in the women-in-sports story that deserves some recognition: This year, the Jogbra turns 40.

In 1977, Hinda Miller had just started working at the University of Vermont and had taken up jogging. But she found she had a problem: What to do with her breasts? "I used two bras," she says. "You know, everyone has their stories of what they did."

Mark Potok is one of the country's top experts on white supremacy, hate groups and right-wing extremism. He joins us to discuss the current climate in Vermont and across the country.
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Mark Potok joins us in our studio to discuss hate and the current political climate.

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Is it OK to do something that you were told not to do and then never tell anybody? We tackle that question from 10-year-old Finn from Seattle. Also in this episode: why do people make really bad choices and want other people's lives to be harder?

Steve Wadsworth greets cows at Laggis Brothers Farm in East Hardwick with a kiss on Sept. 1. Wadsworth, a large animal vet who serves dairy farms, took "Vermont Edition" host Jane Lindholm on a tour of four farms earlier this month.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

We've left the studio in favor of a field trip on this Vermont Edition to see what goes on behind-the-scenes at four large dairy farms in Franklin and Caledonia Counties.

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