Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles.  Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

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Vermont Edition
3:19 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

What We Talk About When We Talk About GMOs

A protest on World Environment Day, Wednesday June 5, 2013, in Quezon, Philippines. A coalition called "Green Moms" advocates organic foods to show their opposition to a genetically modified rice variety known as "Golden Rice."
Bullit Marquez AP

Vermont is poised to pass a GMO labeling bill before the end of the session. The labeling issue is framed as a right to know what's in our food. But that's not the only thing people talk about when they argue about GMOs. There's also a controversy about whether GMOs might be bad for our health, or whether enough research has even been done on the health effects. And there's an argument over whether GMOs lead to an overuse of herbicides, which in turn may create species of super-weeds. Or whether GMOs help farmers use fewer insecticides and till the soil less often.

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Vermont Edition
1:57 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Greenland's Ice Yields New Information About Climate Shifts

Scientists were stunned to discover an ancient tundra landscape frozen under two miles of ice in Greenland. It’s been there for three million years--and may lead geologists to rethink how Greenland’s big ice works. UVM professor Paul Bierman led the team
Joshua Brown/University Of Vermont

When a group of scientists led by UVM’s Paul Bierman started studying a sample of ice taken from the very bottom of Greenland’s ice sheet, they expected to find a mix of ice and dirt or rock. But what they discovered surprised them. It revealed a landscape very unlike what everyone had envisioned, and changes our understanding of what’s been happening to Greenland’s ice over the last several million years.

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Vermont Edition
1:49 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Update: The 2014 Sugaring Season

A long, cold winter followed by a sudden spring is usually not a good dynamic for sugarmakers.

Ann Rose is co-owner of Green Mountain Sugar House in Ludlow. She spoke with Vermont Edition about how the 2014 sugaring season has been going for her and other sugarmakers.

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Vermont Edition
12:00 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Toxic Labeling: Who Should Decide?

A recently passed Senate bill would give the state health department jurisdiction over labeling or banning products containing toxic chemicals.
Rick Bowmer AP

When consumer products such as carpeting, jewelry or cosmetics contain toxic chemicals, who should decide how they should be labeled or if they should banned?

A bill passed by the Senate would give that authority to the state health department. But the House version limits that jurisdiction to just children’s products. And industry leaders would like to further limit its reach.

Bill-sponsor State Senator Kevin Mullin of Rutland and Associated Industries of Vermont Vice President William Driscoll discuss the pros and cons of the bill.

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Vermont Edition
1:35 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Spring Gardening Show

Looking north over the Putney School vegetable garden in 2010.
Putney Pics Flickr

Spring is finally here! Or... well...almost. But it is definitely time to start planning garden beds, preparing the soil, and dreaming of the gardening season ahead.

We'll talk with gardening expert Charlie Nardozzi about the lingering effects of the cold winter, the right time for pruning, new varieties of perennial flowers, and any questions you might have.

Join the conversation: post comments and questions below or write to vermontedition@vpr.net

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Vermont Edition
1:51 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Bartender, Make Mine A Rattle-Skull! Mixing Up Forgotten Cocktails

The Ale Flip was a cocktail made with beer and heated with a red-hot poker.
The History Press

What if the Revolutionary War happened just because all the colonists were rowdy drunks ginning one another up at the various taverns liberally sprinkled around New England? That’s taking it too far, of course, but those early colonists did enjoy their beverages.

The Green Mountain Boys hatched their plans for liberty and freedom over tankards at the Catamount Tavern in Bennington. And the Continental Army gave a ration of spruce beer to all its soldiers on a daily basis.

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Vermont Edition
12:00 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

The Return Of The Stay-At-Home Mom

After decades of decline, the percentage of stay-at-home moms is on the rise.
Jupiterimages Thinkstock

In 1970, nearly half of all mothers stayed home to raise their children. In the next several decades though, more and more women returned to work after having children. Pew Research Center has released a new study that shows the number of stay-at-home moms has risen to 29 percent.

D’Vera Cohn, senior writer for Pew Research, and Kathryn Flagg, staff writer for Seven Days, discuss the findings and why we’re seeing a return to stay-at-home parenting.

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Vermont Edition
12:00 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

Provenence Of Produce: New Ideas In Buying Local Food

AP Dean Fosdick

When it comes to eating local, the very definition of “local” is changing. Movers and shakers in the local food movement are reframing the concept of local food from being strictly about mileage to one that incorporates a set of implied values — like how the workers or animals were treated, and land stewardship.

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Vermont Edition
1:53 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Update: Deer Ticks In Vermont

Ticks like this are now emerging with warmer spring temperatures and can carry a number of bacteria like Borrelia burgdorferi which causes Lyme disease.
Victoria Arocho AP

Lyme disease was first diagnosed in 1975 in Connecticut. Over the last 40 years, the disease and the insect that carries it, blacklegged tick, have become part of the popular nomenclature.

One person in Vermont who has studied the blacklegged tick, more commonly known as the deer tick, is Lyndon State Biology Professor Alan Giese. Giese spoke with Vermont Edition about his research.

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Vermont Edition
1:47 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Gettysburg Address Documentary Premieres

In Putney, the Greenwood School has been educating boys with significant learning differences since 1978. And for most of those years, the boarding school has maintained a tradition of teaching their students to memorize and recite the Gettysburg Address.

Lincoln delivered the speech at the dedication of the Gettysburg battlefield more than 150 years ago. But the speech and the act of reciting it in a formal hall to hundreds of assembled adults has real significance to Greenwood’s modern-day students.

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