Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles.  Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

Ways To Connect

On July 2, the new Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospital opened in Berlin. The $28.5 million facility is the centerpiece in the state’s mental health care network that has suffered to find enough beds for psychiatric patients since Tropical Storm Irene damaged the state hospital in Waterbury almost three years previous to this opening.

But as of just a few weeks ago, only 21 of the new care facilities’ 25 beds were available, in part because of a shortage of nurses. The new hospital was using traveling nurses to fill some of the open slots.

Efficiency Vermont might seem like a non-profit that helps you get cheaper, more environmentally friendly light bulbs, but actually, it is a utility. Efficiency Vermont was created by the Public Service Board in 2000 to help Vermonters use less electricity. That savings is the energy Efficiency Vermont, as a utility, produces. It’s about 13% of our total electric consumption.

Lieutenant Governor Phil Scott is running for his third term as Vermont’s second in command and as the highest-ranking Republican in the state.

He shares his thoughts on single-payer health care, school funding, renewable energy, job creation and stimulating the Vermont economy. And we’ll get his reaction to the IBM sale of the Essex plant.

Also on the program, we talk with Christine Ryan, executive director and lobbyist for the Vermont State Nurses' Association, about the shortage of psychiatric nurses in the state.

Last spring the legislature passed a law requiring foods that contain genetically modified organisms – or GMOs- to be labeled. That labeling will go into effect in 2016, and the details of how that labeling would work were left up to the Attorney General to figure out.

The AG’s office has just released an early draft proposal of the GMO labeling rules. And the office is holding meetings around the state this week to give manufacturers, farmers, grocers, and regular citizens a chance to take a sneak peek.

"It's been a long summer," says Frank Cioffi of the Greater Burlington Industrial Corporation, referring the long-awaited announcement that IBM is offloading its microchip manufacturing division, which includes the IBM plant in Essex Junction, to GlobalFoundries. We look at why IBM is paying Global Foundries $1.5 billion over three years to take over that business, what it means for employees,  and the impact on the state's economy.

Last spring, the legislature passed a law requiring foods that contain genetically modified organisms, or GMO's, to be labeled. That labeling will go into effect in 2016 and the Attorney General's office has been working to come up with rules for what the labels will look like.

The state has just released a draft proposal of those rules and is holding informal meetings around the state this week to get public feedback.

Publicly held companies have a financial responsibility to their shareholders: they have to make money. But benefit corporations can be responsible to the environment, their employees, and their communities. Businesses that have become benefit corporations say they are taking it into their own hands to make the world a better place.

We’ll talk to Tom Payne of King Arthur Flour and Ashley Orgain of Seventh Generation, two Vermont companies who have gone through the certification process to become benefit companies.

James Gustave “Gus” Speth grew up in South Carolina blissfully unaware of the racial tension that was roiling around him.

It wasn’t until he went to college “up north” that he saw some of the injustice that he was shielded from as a child.

Though he did do a little work organizing in the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s, Gus Speth has long felt that he didn’t do enough.

He was the first Chief Justice of Vermont, a Governor of the early republic (before Vermont became a state), and one of the first Senators elected to represent Vermont in nation's the capitol. Yet many people don't know his name.

We talk to Judge Robert Mello, author of a new book about Moses Robinson, who he calls a founding father of Vermont.

Broadcast live on Thursday, October 16 at noon; rebroadcast at 7 p.m.

For most people living in rural America, electricity in the home didn’t come along until the late 1940s. Big electric companies were reluctant to invest in the infrastructure needed to get energy all the way out to a few farmers living at the end of a dirt road.

So the government loaned money to start Rural Electric Cooperatives - ratepayer owned non-profits that provided electricity to rural America. And Rural Electric Cooperatives still provide energy to over 42 million customers in this country, including two cooperatives in Vermont.

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