Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

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Vermonters have a new way of reaching help when they are having a mental health crisis: the Crisis Text Line. People can text the initials "VT" to the number 741741 and a trained crisis counselor will respond within 5 minutes.

Evan Vucci / AP

Many communities are concerned that the Trump administration could have a negative impact on their lives. Among them are people who identify as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer, people whose rights have only recently been codified.

Ken Wiedemann / iStock

Act 46 is a Vermont law that requires towns to consider school district consolidation. Some are doing it willingly. They say their students are going to have more educational options with a consolidated district. They also hope to save money through efficiencies that will be created.

Andy Duback / AP

Phil Scott will be Vermont's next governor - he'll take office in January of next year. We're talking about the state of the transition to the new administration. 

Lake Morey Resort, courtesy

Is it that living in the far north only attracts a brave and hearty soul? Or does almost six months of winter weather start to addle the brain and motivate seemingly sane individuals to enter events like the Lake Elmore Polar Splash or the 8-Hour Polar Bear Obstacle Challenge?

For the second year in a row, Green Mountain Transit is providing a Free Ride Day to help Vermont shoppers reach local retailers on "Small Business Saturday," which falls on Nov. 26 this year.

Library of Congress

On this special episode, we’re going to listen to a story about how turkeys used to get from farms in Vermont to markets and dinner tables far away in Boston, a distance of a couple hundred miles. This was before refrigerated trucks. So how do you think they did it?

GMVozd / iStock

Why do we like to eat certain foods? Why do some people like to eat spicy food and some people don't like to eat vegetables? Why does pineapple hurt your mouth when you eat too much of it? Why do we taste things and how? Why do different foods taste different? Do animals have the same taste buds as people?

Toby Talbot / AP

Mention drones and a variety of ideas float into people's minds. They might imagine unmanned armed military vehicles. Or the apparatus used to fly over Vermont's lush fall foliage to record videos that get posted on social media.

A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Vermont shows a disturbing prevalence of racial bias in mental health services.

Craig Dingle / iStock.com

A lot of us have been in conversations lately about what it's like to be a woman in this particular political and cultural moment. On the next Vermont Edition, we're moving that conversation into the studio.

Oliver Parini for VPR/file

Democrat T.J. Donovan, Vermont's incoming attorney general, says he's prepared to stand up to the federal government.

PinkBadger / iStock

The number of homeless individuals and families in Vermont has been dropping steadily and the state has increased the amount of emergency housing for those in need.

But the flip side is that there is still a need for temporary and transitional shelter in Vermont. And the number of individuals and families needing shelter because of domestic violence has not dropped.

Courtesy Amanda Crispel

Students and staff at Champlain College's Emergent Media Center have collaborated on an online game that tackles sexual harassment and assault on campus.

Toby Talbot / AP

You may have been paying attention to other news, but on Election Day last week, Entergy announced plans to sell the shuttered Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant. The deal still needs to be approved, but it could speed up the decommissioning process by decades.

Labuda / iStock

On Tuesday, four more states approved the legalization of the use of recreational marijuana. That included two in New England: Massachusetts and Maine.

That could have a profound effect on legalization efforts in Vermont.

Jessica Hyde / istock

Are ghosts real? Why do some cultures believe in fairies and gnomes and some don't? We'll learn about how beliefs in ghosts vary in different parts of the world with Justin McDaniel of University of Pennsylvania. Then we're off to Iceland to learn about magical creatures with Terry Gunnell.

Charles Krupa / AP

Races in the Granite State were of interest to a national audience in this election, from the presidential race to one for a U.S. Senate seat.

Oliver Parini / VPR

State Senator David Zuckerman faced formidable opposition in the Democratic primary for Lieutenant Governor when he defeated House Speaker Shap Smith and Burlington State Representative Kesha Ram.

Kathleen Masterson / VPR

After Election Day, finally, come the results. We're digging into the data with our panel of Vermont political reporters. We'll look at results from races at all levels: national, statewide, and local. From the presidential contest to the statewide races to your town's ballot questions.

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