Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

Vermont Law School, Courtesy

Vermont Law School has announced the creation of the Center for Justice Reform to train individuals on the use of less punitive forms of accountability than incarceration. Among its offerings, the center teaches theory and practice of reform efforts like restorative justice.

Two people holding hands in comfort.
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The holidays can be stressful as we juggle work, family, money concerns and travel. But it can be an especially difficult time for those experiencing loss.

The FCC is expected to eliminate net neutrality regulations in a vote on Thursday. We will look at what the changes are and how they could affect internet users.
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If all the reports are true, the death knell tolls for net neutrality on Thursday. That's when the FCC votes on repealing those regulations.

The Vermont Supreme Court ruled a parent's behavior toward children can play a key role in determining whether they can be granted legal parental rights.
John Dillon / VPR File

Who is legally recognized as a parent? That's the question at the heart of a recent Vermont Supreme Court decision that a family law expert says exposes the gaps in Vermont's laws that affect modern families.

Crafts, spirits, food, and more: what are you favorite "Made in Vermont" gifts?
From left: Vermont Holiday Craft Shop; Silo Distillery; Wikimedia Commons; Boutin Snowshoes

What makes a perfect gift that shares the spirit of Vermont? Vermont Edition is showcasing the handiwork of the Green Mountain State with a show dedicated to "Made in Vermont" gifts.

No one is happy when the Vermont Department of Health sends out a press release that opens with: "we may be in for a rough flu season."

Courtesy: Oliver Parini

High school sports remain popular with many students, families and fans in Vermont but as tastes and demographics have changed, so have athletic programs.  

Pennies were first introduced in 1793, when the United States established our system of money.
Darren415

In this episode of But Why we visit a credit union to learn what money is all about and Slate Money hosts Felix Salmon, Anna Szymanski and Jordan Weissman answer questions about why money plays such a big role in modern society. How was money invented? Why can't everything be free? How do you earn money? Why don't kids go to work? How was the penny invented? Why are dimes so small?

Nina Keck / VPR FILE

In the 19th century, Rutland flourished as the local marble industry thrived. But now it faces a shrinking population and a host of challenges, including lack of affordable housing and high lead levels in the city's children. Dave Allaire served on Rutland's Board of Alderman for 19 years before defeating incumbent mayor Chris Louras in March.

"Spreading Manure," captured in Kirby, Vt. in 1973. One of the many photographs in Richard Brown's new book "The Last of the Hill Farms."
Richard Brown, courtesy

Photographer Richard Brown moved to Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom in 1971, where his photographs of the people, places, and landscapes of this corner of rural Vermont captured a disappearing way of life for the state's fading hill farms. 

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Vermont’s police departments face a workforce shortage as older officers approach retirement. Some forces are in year-round recruitment mode, as they could see 20 to 30 percent of their officers retiring in the near future. Experts say more diversity in police ranks could increase the public’s trust and cooperation, which creates safer communities.

Whether its limiting the number of pills in a prescription or accessing treatment and therapy, insurance providers play a central role in the opioid crisis.
Fuse / Thinkstock

The stories of America's opioid crisis are sadly familiar: stories of addiction, overdose, and suffering. But what role do insurance companies play in this struggle? 

"Vermont Edition" discusses the amazing year it's been in our night skies, from an interstellar asteroid to the launch of SpaceX.
Nataniil / iStock

Look, up in the sky! It's SpaceX, the Cassini probe, a solar eclipse, and so much more. 2017 was an incredible year in space. And we'll recap many of the biggest developments in and out of our galaxy.

Vermont baker Gesine Bullock-Prado is the host of a new program on Food Network.
Food Network, Courtesy

Gesine Bullock-Prado has added one more accolade to her already extensive resume. She's now the star of a new six-episode Food Network series premiering Saturday, Dec. 2 at 12:30 p.m. called Baked in Vermont.

The challenge of winter driving awaits. "Vermont Edition" gets you ready for the excitement ahead.
REKINC1980 / iStock

Snow and ice are fantastic for skiing, riding, skating and sledding. But while sliding along at speed can be fun on hillsides and frozen ponds, those same properties can make driving in the winter a challenge.

Vermont Edition gets you prepped for the tricky traffic ahead by understanding the science of snow tires, winter driving strategies and a look at what plans VTrans has for salting and brining the roadways during our icy season.

"Vermont Edition" looks at how social and personal problems impact student behavior and the adjustments schools are making to help students and involve parents and communities.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press

High school and middle school education was once confined to teaching the Three Rs.

But increasingly schools are being called on to help students with social and personal problems ranging from the negative effects of social media to trauma in their home lives; problems that can lead to disruptive behavior.

Katherine Welles / iStock

Who gets to call themselves "Vermonters"? We're having a conversation about newcomers, old-timers, and those who have been in Vermont for generations.

Glasses, a book and a mug sit on a wood table in front of a couch with pillows.
wernerimages / iStockphoto.com

One of life's joys is losing yourself in the pages of a good read. As it gets colder outside, we're talking about books to cozy up with — and we want to hear what titles you suggest your fellow listeners check out.

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What's the biggest number? Who was the first mathematician? Why is seven a lucky number? Why is fifth grade math so hard? We're tackling something new: questions about math! With us to offer some answers and some mind-blowing concepts is author Joseph Mazur.

Sen. Bernie Sanders - pictured here on Capitol Hill on Oct. 17 with Sen. Debbie Stabenow, Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Shumer - joins "Vermont Edition" to discuss key issues, including the proposed GOP tax plan.
Andrew Harnik / Associated Press

Completing a week when Vermont Edition has heard from all of the state's congressional delegation, Sen. Bernie Sanders joins us on the program.

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