Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles.  Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

Ways To Connect

Both of New Hampshire’s congressional districts, one of its Senate seats and the Governorship are all contested this year- and they’re all pretty tight races. Valley News local news editor John Gregg gave Vermont Edition an overview of election season in the Granite State.

The most high-profile race in New Hampshire is that for the US senate, where former governor and first-term incumbent Jeanne Shaheen is locked in a tight race against Scott Brown, the former Republican senator from Massachusetts.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

A Rutland-area man who had been traveling in Sierra Leone and Guinea is in voluntary quarantine in an undisclosed location. In a hastily called press conference on October 28th, Vermont governor Peter Shumlin explained that the man, now identified as Peter Italia, is cooperating with the quarantine request.

School consolidation is something a lot of towns are considering, even without a legislative mandate.  We’ll get a close up look at one community’s conversations about the possibility of school consolidation with members of the consolidation study committee at Windsor Central Supervisory Union.

We’ll talk to Alice Worth, Windsor Central Supervisory Union Superintendent, and Greg Greene, member of the Joint Elementary Study Committee and chair of the Pomfret Elementary School Board.

Broadcast live on Wednesday, October 29 at noon; rebroadcast at 7 p.m.

Sure, we’ve all heard of apple pie and pumpkin pie… but what about Marlborough pie, and Osgood pie? Have you ever tried grape pie, or Chess pie? These were all common sweet pie recipes back when our great grandmas were baking pies. At that time, it was not uncommon for women to bake a pie or two a day.

We learn all about the history of sweet pies, and get a few recipes with Anne-Haynie Collins. Her new book Vintage Pies: Classic American Pies for Today’s Home Baker.

On July 2, the new Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospital opened in Berlin. The $28.5 million facility is the centerpiece in the state’s mental health care network that has suffered to find enough beds for psychiatric patients since Tropical Storm Irene damaged the state hospital in Waterbury almost three years previous to this opening.

But as of just a few weeks ago, only 21 of the new care facilities’ 25 beds were available, in part because of a shortage of nurses. The new hospital was using traveling nurses to fill some of the open slots.

Efficiency Vermont might seem like a non-profit that helps you get cheaper, more environmentally friendly light bulbs, but actually, it is a utility. Efficiency Vermont was created by the Public Service Board in 2000 to help Vermonters use less electricity. That savings is the energy Efficiency Vermont, as a utility, produces. It’s about 13% of our total electric consumption.

Lieutenant Governor Phil Scott is running for his third term as Vermont’s second in command and as the highest-ranking Republican in the state.

He shares his thoughts on single-payer health care, school funding, renewable energy, job creation and stimulating the Vermont economy. And we’ll get his reaction to the IBM sale of the Essex plant.

Also on the program, we talk with Christine Ryan, executive director and lobbyist for the Vermont State Nurses' Association, about the shortage of psychiatric nurses in the state.

Last spring the legislature passed a law requiring foods that contain genetically modified organisms – or GMOs- to be labeled. That labeling will go into effect in 2016, and the details of how that labeling would work were left up to the Attorney General to figure out.

The AG’s office has just released an early draft proposal of the GMO labeling rules. And the office is holding meetings around the state this week to give manufacturers, farmers, grocers, and regular citizens a chance to take a sneak peek.

"It's been a long summer," says Frank Cioffi of the Greater Burlington Industrial Corporation, referring the long-awaited announcement that IBM is offloading its microchip manufacturing division, which includes the IBM plant in Essex Junction, to GlobalFoundries. We look at why IBM is paying Global Foundries $1.5 billion over three years to take over that business, what it means for employees,  and the impact on the state's economy.

Last spring, the legislature passed a law requiring foods that contain genetically modified organisms, or GMO's, to be labeled. That labeling will go into effect in 2016 and the Attorney General's office has been working to come up with rules for what the labels will look like.

The state has just released a draft proposal of those rules and is holding informal meetings around the state this week to get public feedback.

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