Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound. In 2016 she started the nationally recognized But Why, which takes questions from kids all over the world and finds interesting people to answer them.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service. Her hobbies include photography, nature writing and wandering the woods and fields of New England. She lives in Monkton.

Democrat Christine Hallquist seeks to unseat incumbent Republican Gov. Phil Scott in the Nov. 6 election.
Matthew Smith / VPR

Live call-in discussion: Christine Hallquist is the former CEO of Vermont Electric Cooperative and the Democratic candidate for governor. She's challenging incumbent Repbublican Gov. Phil Scott in the Nov. 6 election.

Candidate Hallquist joins Vermont Edition to discuss her platform and priorities should she become governor.

Sophie Posner-Brown (left) was diagnosed with a brain tumor when she was 2 years old. She and her twin sister Isabelle talk about life with a serious illness.
courtesy

In today's episode we're not answering any questions. Instead, we're going to talk with 11-year-old twins Isabelle and Sophie Posner-Brown. When Sophie was two, she was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor. She's had three surgeries and lots of chemotherapy, but she's been on a break from chemo for the last four years. The twins talked with But Why about what it's like to live with Sophie's illness.

VPR listener Geri Knortz shared this image of Vermont foliage along Route17 and the Appalachian Gap near Buels Gore.
Geri Knortz

Autumn in the Green Mountain State is when tour buses and cars full of out-of-staters trek to Vermont to see that green turn to gold. Even if it's past peak in some regions, John Sinclair with the Green Mountain and Finger Lakes National Forest says there's still great leaf peeping to be had. And VPR's own Ric Cengeri says a trip to see the foliage is a great excuse to see what Vermont's 251 towns and cities have to offer.

Sen. Bernie Sanders addresses a crowd of supporters at a Detroit rally in August 2018. Sanders is seeking a third term in the U.S. Senate in the Nov. 6 election, facing eight challengers on the ballot.
Carlos Osorio / AP

Incumbent Sen. Bernie Sanders is seeking a third term as Vermont's junior Senator, and he faces a crowded field of challengers—including one Republican and seven Independents—on the Nov. 6 ballot.

We're talking to candidate Bernie Sanders about the objectives he'd pursue if re-elected.

VPR broadcast engineer Kira Parker surveys the top of the Mount Mansfield transmitter site during a June maintenance visit.
Matthew Smith / VPR

Vermont Public Radio's broadcast signal — what listeners hear in the car, or on traditional radios at home or work — emanates from one of 18 transmitters across the state. VPR broadcast engineer Kira Parker travels the state for regular visits to ensure the transmitters are working and keeps the radio signal beaming. 

The membership of the National Assembly of Quebec looks very different after the October 1 provincial election.
OZinOH / flickr

On October 1, the province of Quebec held the general election for its legislative body - the National Assembly of Quebec. The results were historic - a seven-year-old center-right party that campaigned on limits to immigration won the most seats. That makes it the first time since the 1960s that power hasn't been held by either the Liberals or the Parti Quebecois.

Judge Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed to the Supreme Court by the Senate on Saturday. We want to hear your reaction.
Tom Williams / AP

On Saturday, after weeks of division and fury on Capitol Hill and across the country, President Trump's Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh was narrowly confirmed by the Senate. Beyond the politics, Americans have been debating multiple sexual assault allegations against the nominee and the apparent breakdown of norms on both sides of the process. Now, we want to hear what you think.

Retired lawyer James Dunn's book "Breach of Trust" looks at the scandal surrounding Chittenden County Assistant Judge Jane Wheel in the 1980s, tracing the growing controversy as it made its way up to the Vermont Supreme Court.
Onion River Press, courtesy

Lying under oath. Twisting court decisions for personal gain. Misuse of public money. And corruption in the judiciary that went all the way to Vermont’s highest court.

It may sound like the latest legal thriller, but it's the true story that rocked the state in the 1980s, ending with an investigation that saw the first-ever felony charges brought against a Vermont judge.

Sen. Patrick Leahy questioned Judge Brett Kavanaugh as the Senate Judiciary Committee considered his nomination.
Win McNamee / AP

Last week, Sen. Patrick Leahy played a central role in the testimony of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford and Judge Brett Kavanaugh. As the Senate continues to weigh Kavanaugh's confirmation to the Supreme Court, we're talking to Sen. Leahy about the nomination, the FBI investigation and what comes next.

Cartoonist Jason Lutes, whose self portrait appears top left, spent more than 20 years writing and drawing the multi-volume historical epic "Berlin." The final volume was published in September.
Jason Lutes / Drawn & Quarterly

A grizzled journalist writing through his middle age. A young artist in her 20s fleeing an upper middle-class life traced out by her parents. The two meet on a train headed to Berlin in 1928, and their lives unfold, connect and diverge amid the backdrop of a changing Germany between the World Wars. They're among the characters in the graphic novel Berlin by cartoonist and Center for Cartoon Studies professor Jason Lutes.

Bess O'Brien's latest film focuses on the lives of five Vermonts returning to their communities after leaving prison.
Kingdom County Productions, Courtesy

Filmmaker Bess O'Brien's new documentary, Coming Home, follows the lives of five Vermonters released from jail who enter a CoSA — Circle of Support and Accountability — to help with their transition back into their community. We learn about the program, the film and the lives of those involved in CoSAs.

Profile headshot of Gov. Phil Scott.
Angela Evancie / VPR/file

Incumbent Republican Gov. Phil Scott is running for a second two-year term, going up against a number of challengers including Democratic nominee Christine Hallquist. We're talking to Scott as part of our series of interviews with major party candidates for statewide office.

Umesh Acharya, a Bhutanese refugee now living in Shelburne, shared his photography and poetry in the "Visions Of The World" exhibit.
Stephen Mease / Stephen Mease Photography

Paintings, photographs, textiles and poems created by New Americans now living in Vermont make up the new Visions Of The World exhibit, a showcase of art from immigrants with refugee backgrounds now on display in Burlington's Amy E. Tarrant Gallery.

Manchester real estate broker Lawrence Zupan is the Republican candidate for one of Vermont's seats in the U.S. Senate. He's challenging Sen. Bernie Sanders in the Nov. 6 election.
Zupan campaign, courtesy

Republican Lawrence Zupan is seeking Vermont's U.S. Senate seat in the Nov. 6 election. In his first bid for office, the Manchester real estate broker is looking to unseat incumbent Sen. Bernie Sanders. We're talking with Zupan about his platform and what policies he'll pursue if elected. 

Our bodies are made up of cells. Cancer happens when cells divide out of control.
JackBlack3D / istock

A cancer diagnosis can be scary, and for kids it can be bewildering. We've gotten some questions about cancer and in this episode we answer them with Dr. Donald Small, director of pediatric oncology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. We answer how people get sick when it's not caused by germs, how people get cancer, and why cancer "does not have a cure." There's nothing graphic or scary in this episode, but adults may want to give this episode a listen if cancer is something your littles have been dealing with.

Madeleine Kunin joined "Vermont Edition" and a live audience to discuss her new book, "Coming of Age: My Journey to the Eighties."
Anna Ste. Marie / VPR

Former Gov. Madeleine Kunin has been an author, ambassador, advocate and governor in a career that's spanned decades. Now that long life is the focus of her new book about aging.

Gov. Kunin joins Vermont Edition in front of a live audience to talk about her "journey to the eighties" and how aging changes us in mind and spirit. And as the only woman who's served as Vermont's Governor, we'll ask her about the role of women in our current political climate.

An AR-15 rifle pictured with a 30-round magazine and a 10-round magazine. Vermont law now prohibits the sale and purchase of magazines with more than 10 rounds. The high-capacity magazine ban is the focus of one of two lawsuits in Vermont courts.
Charles Krupa / AP

Episode 4 of VPR's five-part podcast series, JOLTED, explores how Republican Gov. Phil Scott, a gun rights advocate, declared that Vermont needed more gun control laws. Within months, Senate Bill 55 was passed, putting several restrictions on gun and ammunition purchases.

Jared Carter, an associate professor at Vermont Law School and VPR commentator, joined Vermont Edition to discuss two lawsuits challenging the new law.

Emotional support animals are increasingly found in public places like stores, businesses and school campuses.
Good Dog Autism Companions / Flickr Creative Commons

Emotional support animals are an increasingly common sight in public, in stores, on campuses and at airports. But accommodating these animals in crowded public spaces isn't easy, and the rules on what's allowed, and where, aren't always clear. We're talking about emotional support animals and how we're making space for them in public areas.

Now is a great time to spot hawks, like this broad-winged hawk seen flying over a field in Putney.
Putneypics / Flickr

It's migration time again, which means high overhead, we'll see a steady stream of birds heading southward. But many of them also winter here. So it's a perfect time to get some direction on where to look and what to look for.

Deb Snell with the nurses' union at UVM Medical Center addresses reporters ahead of the July work stoppage.
Henry Epp / VPR

After months of negotiations between the UVM Medical Center and the hospital's nurses' union yielded no new contract, UVMMC administrators have made what they call their "last, best and final offer." 

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