Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

We recently did an episode all about dogs. But after that came out, Nash, from Fort Dodge, IA, sent us a question wondering if dogs ever get strep throat. So we reached back out to Jessica Hekman to get an answer!

malerapaso / iStock

This episode may not be suitable for our youngest listeners or for particularly sensitive kids.

We're discussing animal ethics with author Hal Herzog. In a follow up to our pets episodes, we look at how we treat animals very differently depending on whether we think of them as pets, food, or work animals. Why do some cultures eat cows and others don't? Why do some cultures not have pets at all? And is it okay to breed animals like dogs that have significant health problems even though we love them? Herzog is the author of Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat: Why It's So Hard to Think Straight About Animals.

Multiple marijuana plants.
labuda / iStock

On Wednesday, Gov. Phil Scott announced his decision on the fate of a marijuana legalization bill that had made its way to his desk. That decision was to veto the bill – but the governor also said there's potential to revisit marijuana legalization if certain changes are made by the Legislature, which is planning to hold a veto session in June.

Screenshot by Sam Gale Rosen / Interactive map from VCGI

Maps have come a long way. We've gone from "here be dragons" on parchment scrolls to an age of satellites, plane-mounted lasers, and democratization - everyone can now be his or her own cartographer. We're diving deep into the latest on what maps are, what they might become, and what we can learn from them.

PeopleImages / iStock

Tossing and turning all night, or drowsiness caused by staying up to play World of Warcraft too long into the night, might seem like mild irritants. But the consequences of lack of sleep can be much more dire.

Courtesy UVM Extension

Invasive plant and animal species exist all around us, but some are more damaging than others. A revamped tool from UVM Extension leverages citizen science to better track where invasive species are now, and which ones are approaching our region.

Annie Russell / VPR

A bill likely to become law would allow additional TIF districts in the state of Vermont. TIF stands for "tax increment financing" and proponents point to the districts as a way to revitalize downtowns around the state. Critics say they divert money that would otherwise go to the Education Fund.

eatcute / iStock

The state's nearly $6 billion budget faces a veto and a lot of uncertainty after that – all because a $26 million question over teachers' health insurance wasn't solved. On Vermont Edition, we talk with the teachers union and the Vermont School Boards Association about what this debate means to the health plans of teachers and to the bottom lines of school districts.

Vermont Fish & Wildlife, Courtesy

The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department is warning people to mitigate the possibility of having a bad encounter with a bear. The department is already gearing up for what they expect to be record human-bear interactions this year.

Amy Forliti / Associated Press

This weekend a seminar is being held in Stowe that critics say will spread misinformation about the risks of vaccines. It's topic in which science and emotion collide for parents and communities.

Jane Lindholm / VPR

Why do dogs have whiskers? Why are dogs' eyesight black and white? Why do dogs have so many babies? Why do dogs have tails and we don't? Why are dogs thumbs so high on their paw? Why don't dogs sweat? Why do dogs roll in the grass? Why aren't dogs and cats friends? Veterinarian and dog scientist Jessica Hekman has answers.

Jane Lindholm / VPR

Why do cats purr? How do cats purr? Why can't we purr? Why do cats "talk" to people, but not other cats? Why do cats sharpen their claws? Are orange cats only male? Why do cats like milk and not water? Why are some cats crazy? Can cats see color? All of your cat questions answered with Abigail Tucker, author of The Lion in the Living Room.

Spider web on a piece of barbed wire.
Natcha29 / iStockphoto.com

Scientists are trying to unlock some of the secrets of spider silk by sequencing the genetic code of the spiders themselves. One new study is led by the University of Vermont and the University of Pennsylvania.

Evan Vucci / Associated Press

President Trump's abrupt firing of FBI Director James Comey has sent shockwaves through Washington and beyond, as concerns mount that the President may be trying to interfere with the investigation into his campaign's possible ties to Russian election meddling.

Nokian Tyres sign outside its Colchester headquarters with arrows pointing to corporate offices, customer service, and shipping and receiving.
Meg Malone / VPR

Nokian Tyres recently announced plans to build a plant in Tennessee, but Tommi Heinonen – head of Nokian Tyres North America – says there are no plans at the moment to move the company's North American headquarters out of Vermont.

Angela Evancie / VPR FILE

Rather than rush to judgment on some key pieces of legislation, Senate President Pro Tem Tim Ashe decided last week to reconvene Wednesday and Thursday. Now as state lawmakers head back to Montpelier, Sen. Ashe is our guest.

Steven Ellingson / iStock

Tick season is upon us. If you've been outside recently, you may well have already had some close encounters with the blood-suckers. And some tick-watchers are predicting that this could be the worst season in years. We're talking with experts about the spread of ticks and the diseases they carry, including Lyme, and some other nasty newcomers. 

Susan Hartman at the VPR Studios in Colchester
Meg Malone / VPR

One of the state's leading advocacy organizations for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer community has new leadership: Susan Hartman is executive director of the Pride Center of Vermont as of May 1.

Angela Evancie / VPR file

VPR's comprehensive coverage of the last days of the legislative session continues on Monday when House Speaker Mitzi Johnson is our guest on Vermont Edition.  We get her perspective on the dramatic last-minute twists in state budget negotiations, teacher health care and marijuana legalization.

A table displays rhino horns seized by Thai Customs officials at a press conference at the Suvarnabhumi Airport in Bangkok, Thailand on March 14.
Associated Press (Sakchai Lalit)

On Wednesday, the University of Vermont Police Services announced that a rhinoceros horn had been stolen from the UVM campus. The demand for rhino horns has led to a global black market and a string of crimes – from museum thefts to the gruesome killings of threatened rhinos. In March, a rhino was even slaughtered inside of a zoo in Paris.

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