Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

Moths are fun to watch and easy to photograph in your own backyard. This is an Eastern Panthea Moth (Panthea furcilla).
Kent McFarland

In this episode we're celebrating the official return of summer to the northern hemisphere by answering some summertime questions! How do fireflies glow and can they control how they blink? Why are owls nocturnal? How do they swivel their heads around? And how do they hoot? Plus a few burning questions about why bug bites itch, why poison ivy and caterpillars and berries can all be poisonous, and how come we have to wear sunscreen!

We'll get answers from wildlife biologists Kent McFarland and Bryan Pfeiffer. Plus we hear an episode of one of VPR's other podcasts, Outdoor Radio.

Eleven year old Katherine Stevens, right, and nine year old Austin Anderson, listen to arguments in Vermont Superior Court, in Hyde Park, Oct. 22, 1997. The two children were part of a lawsuit challenging Act 60, by schoolchildren in Stowe.
Toby Talbot / AP

Live call-in discussion: Twenty years ago, Act 60 reshaped Vermont's education system. Designed to tackle inequality in education spending among towns, the legislation divided communities and made national headlines. Vermont Edition looks back at that debate, and at Act 60's legacy in today's battles over education and equity.

Vermont Law School, Courtesy

Brittmy Martinez, a rising second-year student at Vermont Law School, is one of three VLS students recently named to the National Black Law Students Association's executive board. She is the chief of staff of NBLSA. 

Title IX has been a federal law since 1972. We look at what progress women have made on campus and in business because of the law.
Stockce / iStock

On June 23, 1972, Title IX went into effect, mandating the equal treatment of all students, regardless of gender, in education programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance. So how much have education and professional opportunities for women improved in that time?

South Burlington High School and Milton Middle School have both had rocky conversations about race and inclusion during this school year.
BeholdingEye / iStock

A few recent highly publicized racial incidents at schools have left some Vermonters unsettled, but minority communities say racial bias in schools is an everyday experience, not an outlier. Vermont Edition looks at what Vermont schools should do to address racism.

Frustrated with the stance taken by the Vermont School Board Association on issues like Act 46 and statewide teacher health care negotiations,some school board members have taken the step of forming a new group. It's called the Alliance of Vermont School Board Members.

Seen here is "Sympetrum obtrusum" or a white-faced meadowhawk, snapped by today's show guest Bryan Pfeiffer. Click through this slideshow to see more of Pfeiffer's photography.
Bryan Pfeiffer, courtesy

Even if you're not a fan of insects, you have to be intrigued by their variety, colors, and characteristics. The annual bug show is your opportunity to learn about and get more comfortable with the insects that surround you.

"Before We Sleep" author Jeffrey Lent says he's fascinated by history and how it shapes the present day.
Jack Rowell, courtesy

In his latest novel, Before We Sleep, Vermont author Jeffrey Lent tells the story of how one man's experience serving in World War II shapes not only his life, but that of his wife and daughter. Lent spoke with Vermont Edition about his writing process and why stories from the past preoccupy him.

We learn about how babies are made with Cory Silverberg, author of What Makes a Baby.
PeopleImages / istock

How are babies made? We speak with Cory Silverberg, author of What Makes A Baby, for answers to questions about how we all come into the world.

A new drug called Lyme PReP is being developed at UMass Medical School with the hope of preventing people from contracting Lyme disease from ticks.
Erik Karits / iStock.com

A group of researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School are hoping to make Lyme disease in humans a thing of the past. They are working on an antibody drug that would prevent people from contracting the tick-borne disease.

Patients and staff at the Vermont State Hospital in Waterbury around 1900.
Courtesy, Vermont State Archives

Vermont's prominent role in the American eugenics movement of the early 20th century is an often overlooked part of the state’s history.  The state's brutal history of sterilization, forced institutionalization, and racist pseudoscience is the focus of a new academic paper by our guest.

Poutine is a dish of French fries, cheese curds and gravy.  The dish's modern perception as a Canadian dish, rather than Quebecois dish, is the subject of a recently published paper by UVM graduate student Nicolas Fabien-Ouellet.
juliedeshaies / iStockphoto.com

Poutine originated in Quebec, but over time has come to be seen by many as a Canadian dish. One University of Vermont student is now making the case that this modern association of poutine with Canada at large is an instance of cultural appropriation.

Mike Keeling / Flickr

With the spread of Lyme and other tick-borne diseases, communities have become more concerned with the level of tick activity in their area. But nature does have a way of keeping things in balance. In this case, the hero is the opossum.

Shelburne House is located at Shelburne Farms and is one element of the property explored in Glenn Suokko's new book, "Shelburne Farms: House, Gardens, Farm, and Barns."
Glenn Suokko, Courtesy

In the late 19th century, Dr. William Seward Webb and his wife, Lila Vanderbilt Webb, built an estate on the shores of Lake Champlain. A new book dives into the history of that estate, which became Shelburne Farms.

Low Jianwei / Flickr

The good news is; people are living longer than ever. Unfortunately that means you're even more likely to outlive your retirement savings - assuming you have any in the first place.

A sign in Stowe alerts trucks on Route 108 before the Smugglers' Notch section, as seen in this June 3, 2016 photo. Josh Schultz of the Vermont Agency of Transportation is tasked with trying to fix the problem of stuck trucks in Smugglers' Notch.
Wilson Ring / Associated Press

If there's one place in Vermont a big truck should never go, it's Smugglers' Notch. But since trucks still do get stuck in the notch, the Vermont Agency of Transportation is working on figuring out new ways to warn approaching drivers.

The Burlington Telecom building. The City of Burlington hopes to have a buyer for Burlington Telecom lined up by the fall.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

The financial and ownership future of Burlington Telecom has been in flux for the past several years. The city is actually required to sell Burlington Telecom, and bids are due on Monday.

vitpho / iStock

Lumber, oil, food, electronics, pretty much anything you can get your hands on - a truck probably carried it part of the way to where you are. We're talking about truckers and the trucking industry in Vermont.  We'll look at how the lives of truckers have changed, and the ongoing challenges faced by the industry.

fhogue / iStock

Just two years after Vermont's out-of-state prisoners were moved to a private facility in Michigan operated by GEO Group, they'll be on the move again. They're about to be re-located to a state-run prison in Pennsylvania.

Cathy Stanley-Erickson / Flickr

It's our annual spring gardening show! Most parts of Vermont still aren't technically past frost danger, but it's a great time to get into the garden and there are plenty of cold hardy vegetables you might already even be harvesting.

We're joined by gardening expert Charlie Nardozzi.

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