Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles.  Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

Ways To Connect

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How's work? It's a question when asked of a friend can open a massive can of worms. Sometimes they can't stop gushing about how great things are going and about the new promotion. Other times you'll hear a never-ending litany about a demonic boss or nonsensical company policies.

So what is it that separates the good from the bad when it comes to jobs?

Ken Teegardin / SeniorLiving.com

How do you think Vermont's economy is doing?

Different economic indicators can tell different stories: from unemployment, to wages, to inequality, to the Main Street in your city or town. What are your the indicators you see that make a difference in your own economic life? What do you think of the state's economic outlook in the short and long terms?

Charles Krupa / AP

School lunches now have more fruits and vegetables, but a new study shows that doesn't mean that kids are necessarily eating more healthy foods — at least in the short run.

Ted S. Warren / AP

The forest fires in California and the Pacific Northwest may feel very far away, but crews of local firefighters and Forest Service employees have been rotating out to those locations all summer to provide relief and assistance in fire suppression.

AP/Toby Talbot

Stories about New Orleans ten years after Hurricane Katrina have prompted Vermonters to also reflect on the four years since Tropical Storm Irene; both anniversaries are this weekend. A UVM disaster sociologist says that social and economic advantages are the strongest indicators of how a child will do in recovering from a disaster, rather personality or character traits. 

Ric Cengeri / VPR

The state of Vermont and the EPA are collaborating on a twenty-year plan to reduce the phosphorus running into Lake Champlain by more thirty percent. That includes federal lake pollution targets and the state's plan for how to get to those goals.

We're looking at the new targets, the plan to hit them, and whether it will all be enough to keep the lake clean for coming generations.

Agento04 / iStock

A marshy pond is the perfect spot for catching frogs, trying not to spook them, then scooping one into your hands and peeking between your fingers just enough to see the little guy before he jumps away. 

iStock

Earlier this year, Vermont students took the new "Smarter Balanced" standardized test, or SBAC. The results of that test are being released to the public on Monday, Aug. 24.

AP

Blas Guigni is a UVM graduate student who ran an acute care clinic in Iraq. He is now studying muscle conditions at the level of a single muscle fiber - and looking for cures to conditions he himself may someday face. His work involves looking at muscle function at the cellular level.

He joined us to discuss the research he is conducting under UVM professor Michael Toth.

Earlier this month, it was announced that Vermont will receive a $3 million federal grant to expand treatment for opioid dependency in the state.

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