Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

Mike Groll / Associated Press

The federal government's H-2B visa program allows temporary, non-agricultural workers from certain foreign countries to fill seasonal positions in the U.S. Vermont's resort, lodging, and restaurant industries rely on these workers. But a cap on the number of these visas could have a negative effect on the these employers.

The golden dome of the Vermont Statehouse with a blue sky background.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

Vermont lawmakers are hoping to end the legislative session by the end of this week, but there are some big issues still being debated.

Sarah Priestap / Valley News

Is it ever against the law for something to be ugly? If you don't like a building going up next to your house, do you have any power to stop it?

 We're talking about what rights individuals, communities and regions have to control the appearance of a changing landscape - and who gets to decide what passes muster.

A bunch of periwinkles
Jane Lindholm / VPR

It's not often you get to eat gourmet food for college credit. One lucky class at the University of Vermont was recently treated to such a meal, but with a twist – the dishes featured invasive species.

Jane Lindholm / VPR

The University of Vermont Medical Center in Burlington is one of four hospitals that have agreed to get reimbursed for Medicaid patients based on a pre-set per-patient per-month fee.

Alden Pellett / Associated Press

Wild turkeys were once extirpated from the Vermont landscape because of over-hunting and loss of forest land. Now they number somewhere between 50,000 and 60,000.

Marcelo Krasilcic / Nonesuch Records

The Magnetic Fields formed in 1989 in the Boston area. Their seminal CD, 69 Love Songs, made them the darlings of rock critics a decade later. The band is fronted by lead singer, songwriter and producer Stephin Merritt, who lived for awhile in Vermont as a child.

Lindsay Raymondjack Photography / Courtesy Vermont Stage

Adoption is emotional process that's even more layered when parents adopt a child from another culture. The family's attention to race, privilege, language and cultural expectations will be forever changed. Those are some of the themes of a current production by Vermont Stage.

Tkgd2007 for Wikipedia / Wikimedia Commons

Who was the first person? Paleoanthropologist Adam Van Arsdale answers one of the most frequent questions we get here at But Why. Also: how does evolution work? Was there a first of every living thing? How did the first animal come alive? How did monkeys turn into people? And what did cavemen eat that we still eat today?

LPETTET / iStock.com

How do you define an 'employee' versus a 'contractor'? This is a debate that has gone on for years at the Statehouse, but if the question were simple, it would have been solved already.

A street corner in downtown Brattleboro, Vermont
J. Stephen Conn / Flickr Creative Commons

Think about ideal images of downtowns and village centers, and a few ideas will come to mind – thriving storefronts, neighbors bumping into each other and public places for people to gather. Author Philip Langdon might argue that's the result when we design our downtowns to be walkable.

Meriel Jane Waissman / iStock

As concerns increase over internet privacy and the safety of personal information, Vermont is considering a bill to look closer into the activities of "data brokers."

Illustration of President Donald Trump overlayed on top of multiple speech bubbles.
Illustration by Kevin Whipple

In a four-year presidential term, the commander in chief will be in power for over 1,400 days. But it's the first 100 that have become a focus for a new president, so VPR collected listeners' opinions of President Donald Trump's first 100 days.

Patti Daniels / VPR

Sunday began the annual observance of Yom HaShoah, a day of remembrance for victims and survivors of the Holocaust.  In communities around Vermont, people gathered to share their own families' history of escape and survival from the genocide of Jews during World War II.

jtyler / iStock

Obvious signs of spring can take a while to present themselves here in the north country. Trees are slow to form buds and leaves. Flowers won't be pushing up through the cold ground for a while yet.

But one great sign of spring has revealed itself. The birds have returned.

Chris and Martin Kratt chat with Jane Lindholm at the VPR studios.
Meg Malone / VPR

For 20 years, brothers Chris and Martin Kratt have been taking kids on adventures around the world through their TV shows, including Wild Kratts, Zoboomafoo, and Kratts' Creatures. They spent many childhood summers exploring the wilds of Vermont. In this special episode, we are sharing a Vermont Edition interview Jane did with the Kratts for her other radio show.

Chris and Martin Kratt performing their live 'Wild Kratts' show on stage.
Courtesy of Wild Kratts Live

The Kratt brothers have introduced kids across the country to a love of animals and nature through a series of wildly popular TV shows, including Kratts' Creatures, Zoboomafoo and now Wild Kratts.

In billiards tournaments held recently by the Green Mountain American Poolplayers Association, the winners were all women. Liz Ford, owner of the Green Mountain APA and a former professional pool player, spoke to Vermont Edition Wednesday about this feat and the success of women in her sport.

A bootprint in the mud.
photosoup / iStockphoto.com

Vermonters may be looking for a chance to explore the great outdoors now that it's springtime, but venturing out on a hike during the mud season could actually cause damage to trails.

Patti Daniels / VPR

A few thousand students and parents in the Essex High School community lived through a scary morning last week. A suspected threat to the high school triggered safety procedures for all the schools in Essex Junction. It was a scenario that teachers and students drill for but rarely experience in real life.

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