Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

Sheriff Keith Clark underwent therapy at the Brattleboro Retreat for depression and suicidal thoughts. He's going public with the hope that it will help others.
Toby Talbot / AP File

One of Vermont's most well-known law enforcement officers is speaking out about his battle with depression and suicidal thoughts, in the hopes that it might help others seek help.

Maj. Gen. Steven Cray, pictured on far right at a 2013 press conference announcing the F-35 basing in Burlington, is adjutant general of the state of Vermont. Cray spoke to "Vermont Edition" about recently announced policies affecting the U.S. military.
Angela Evancie / VPR File

During the United States' longrunning conflict in Afghanistan, Vermont Guard soldiers and airmen have been deployed to the country multiple times. When President Donald Trump announced a troop increase in Afghanistan earlier this month, it came as no surprise to Maj. Gen. Steven Cray, adjutant general of the state of Vermont.

Cray spoke to Vermont Edition about how the troop increase might affect those who serve in the Vermont Guard and also discussed the president's stated objective to ban transgender people from serving in the U.S. armed forces.

President Theodore Roosevelt addresses a crowd in Bellows Falls on September 1, 1902.
Courtesy, SMU Central University Library

Ted Kohn, the new dean of the college of liberal arts at Norwich University, is a Theodore Roosevelt expert.

He has written or edited three books on Roosevelt.

With the 26th president's many ties to Vermont, it's only appropriate that Kohn has landed in the state.

A fight in Burlington's City Hall Park led to a man being stabbed in the neck in August. We're talking about whether criminal penalties for repeated civil violations could stem this type of violence.
Nicholas Erwin / flickr

Incidents of violence in downtown Burlington - including two recent stabbings - have led the police chief and others to call for criminal penalties for racking up too many civil violations, like public drunkenness. On Monday, the city council passed a resolution taking a step in that direction.

Critics say it's a step along the path to criminalizing poverty and homelessness. We're hearing the debate.

A replica of the Enterprise bridge set from the original "Star Trek" television series is seen here in Ticonderoga, N.Y. on Aug. 13, 2016 at "Trekonderoga." The set will now have a permanent home in the town.
Hans Pennink / Associated Press

Visitors to this past weekend's "Trekonderoga" Star Trek convention in Ticonderoga, New York, got to tour a near-perfect replica of the original series set, housed in a building downtown. Now thanks to a gift from the wife of an heir to the Mars Candy fortune, that building will become the set's permanent home.

Former Vermonter and award-winning chef Seamus Mullen talks to us about his latest book, "Real Food Heals: Eat to Feel Younger and Stronger Every Day."
Penguin Random House, courtesy

Award-winning chef Seamus Mullen grew up in Vermont and is now the owner of several New York City restaurants. And he says you can eat nutritiously while enjoying outstanding dishes.

Shani Stoddard, recent winner of Outright Vermont's "Drag Idol" competition, says he loves performing drag.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

For the last 14 years, the LGBTQ advocacy organization Outright Vermont has hosted "Drag Idol," where novice drag queens and drag kings are invited to perform in a drag competition. The 2017 Drag Idol winner was Shani Stoddard, who took home the $100 prize and bragging rights.

Antifa is the name given to anti-fascist groups.
Labsas / iStock

When white supremacists rallied in Charlottesville, Virginia, they were met with resistance from counter-protesters, including members of the antifa, the anti-fascist movement.

Antifa supporters say they are sending a strong message to neo-Nazis and white supremacists and they're not afraid to use violence or intimidation to get their point across. But some people worry that Antifa actually inflames the violence and is a threat to free speech.

A blue-spotted salamander poses for its close-up. We're checking in on the amphibians and reptiles of Vermont.
Kiley Briggs / courtesy of the Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas

Here's a word you might not know: herp (verb). It means to search for reptiles and amphibians. If you're a herper (noun) - either a dabbler or a full-blown frog freak - you won't want to miss this Vermont Edition. We're talking with local guru Jim Andrews; he'll give us an update on the cold-blooded world and answer your questions. 

Program originally aired in September 2015: A few years ago, we dispatched a team of producers and reporters to the Champlain Valley Fair and recorded sounds and stories. It's a great listen that we're bringing back again now that we're deep into fair season.

Earlier this summer, the state's economist told the Vermont Legislature that the revenue forecast for the rest of the year had been downgraded to the tune of $28 million.

Some of that gap had already been anticipated and addressed by lawmakers, but Gov. Phil Scott had to come up with a plan for how to cut the remainder out of the current budget. Last Thursday, Scott presented his plan to the LegislatureVermont Edition spoke with VPR's Peter Hirschfeld about how it went.

UVM President Tom Sullivan at a 2013 news conference. Sullivan has led the university since 2012.
Toby Talbot / AP

Colleges and universities have been at the center of some controversial issues lately. We're talking with University of Vermont President  Tom Sullivan about these issues and how they play out at Vermont’s largest public university. 

Honeybees work together to store up honey to survive the winter. Honey is concentrated nectar from flowers.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

Why do bees pollinate? How do bees make honey? Why do bees have stingers? Why do bees die when they sting you? What's the difference between a bee and a wasp? Does honey have healing properties? Vermont farmer and beekeeper John Hayden of The Farm Between answers all of your bee questions! And we learn about one curious kid's app, which he hopes will help save pollinators.

St. Michael's College graduates Danny Divis, left, and Justin McKenzie, right, throw out first pitches at the Boston Red Sox's "Vermont Night" at Fenway Park on Aug. 5. The two hockey players were awarded the Hockey Humanitarian Award last spring.
Dan Brown / Kapitol Photography

Danny Divis and Justin McKenzie, recent St. Michael's College graduates who played on the hockey team, started the mental health awareness campaign Hope Happens Here while they were students. This past spring they were recognized with the Hockey Humanitarian Award, a national honor for collegiate athletes who give back to their community.

Scientists say storms like this one in Waitsfield in 2010 are dumping more rain on the Northeast
Toby Talbot / AP

The draft National Climate Report both refines and underscores the impact of human activity on our climate. We're focusing in on the effects in Vermont and the Northeast.

Betty Smith Mastaler, seen here in 1978, talked to "Vermont Edition" recently about her first years at VPR and the state of the station.
VPR file

Aug. 13, 2017 marked Vermont Edition's 10th anniversary, and the 40th anniversary of Vermont Public Radio. To mark the occasion, we talked to someone who has been with the station for more than 40 years and has done a little bit of everything: Betty Smith Mastaler.

Nicholas Erwin / flickr

Next week, people across the country will turn their eyes - hopefully safely protected - to the skies to watch a rare solar eclipse. We're looking up too. We'll talk about the eclipse, and about stargazing, astronomy, and all the latest from space - including the dramatic final mission of the Saturn probe Cassini. 

Brittany Caine-Conley, Congregate Charlottesville's lead organizer, speaks to those gathered at a vigil on Sunday, Aug. 13 at the site where the day before a car crashed into people protesting a white nationalist rally in the city.
Steve Helber / Associated Press

White supremacy, violence and even death played out in the streets of Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend. On this Vermont Edition, we'll discuss how we talk about these recent events and also look at what we can do here to address the issues raised.

VPR's Gunshots project explores the role of guns in life - and death - in Vermont through commentary, data and in depth reporting. We'll discuss the data and hear from you.
Taylor Dobbs, Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

This week, VPR has been presenting a project called Gunshots — our team compiled and analyzed data from every recorded gun death in the state over six years. VPR's Taylor Dobbs joins us to discuss the project, and the data.

When you're the economist for the Vermont legislature, sometimes you have to deliver unwelcome news to lawmakers.

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