Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service. Her hobbies include photography, nature writing and wandering the woods and fields of New England. She lives in Monkton.

The report from Vermont's Opioid Coordination Council highlights some successes in the state's response to the opioid crisis, but stresses the need to increase prevention and do more for Vermonters in recovery.
Moussa81 / iStock

Thousands of Vermonters have been treated for opioid addiction, and prescriptions for addictive painkillers are down. Vermont's Opioid Coordination Council says that these are signs of progress, but more still needs to be done to create a "firewall of resilience" to the deadly opioid crisis in Vermont. 

Jane Lindholm / VPR

But Why visits the New England Aquarium in Boston to get answers to those and other questions kids have sent us about fish.

'Vermont Edition' is broadcasting live Thursday from the 2018 Vermont Farm Show.
Matthew Smith / VPR

The Champlain Valley Expo is hosting more than 150 exhibitors over three days for this year's Vermont Farm Show, and Vermont Edition will be there too, broadcasting live. We'll talk to some of the folks there about what they do - farmers, exhibitors, and whomever else we find.

Rep. Peter Welch offers his take on President Donald Trump's State of the Union Address.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

Washington has been abuzz with debates over the budget extension vote, immigration reform related to DACA and net neutrality. Congressman Peter Welch joins Vermont Edition to discuss these topics and offer his reaction to President Trump's State of the Union address.

Isidro Rodriguez, left, is joining with Red Kite Candy's Mike McCabe to raise money for Food 4 Kids through the company’s Candy Lab program.
Isidro Rodriguez, courtesy

A New Hampshire man who's made it his mission to pay off lunch debt at his local schools is joining with a Bradford candy company for a candy-making partnership to raise money for his cause.

As Vermont's workforce ages, the state's labor force is losing workers. Changing that trend, economists and elected officials say, is key to Vermont's future.
Peter Hirschfeld (far left), Ric Cengeri (left center), VPR File / Pexels

Facing an aging population and a shrinking labor pool, the need for Vermont's workforce to change trajectory has been a problem for years.

Vermont Edition looks at what's being proposed by Gov. Phil Scott's administration to realize that change, and the larger trends shaping that struggle.

Bees Wrap is used as an alternative to plastic wrap and sandwich bags and is made by a team in Bristol.
You're So Golden

A Bristol entrepreneur's homemade food packaging product was growing nicely and sustainably until a Buzzfeed video featuring the company went viral last year. Sarah Kaeck, founder of Bee's Wrap, quickly ramped up production as the interest threatened to overwhelm capacity.

GPS systems and navigation apps sometimes face challenges navigating Vermont's roads.
Shannon McGee / flickr

A car that ended up in Lake Champlain made headlines after the out-of-town sightseers behind the wheel said they were steered out onto the ice by the Waze driving app.

We're talking about the challenges for navigation apps in a state like Vermont, with plenty of dirt roads and snowmobile trails, and a lower population of users. 

ThomasVogel / iStock

In the wake of the passage of Vermont's recreational marijuana law, Vermont Edition looked at the health impact of smoking cannabis.

Dr. Garth Garrison, a pulmonary disease specialist at the University of Vermont Medical Center, spoke about what is currently known about smoking, smoking marijuana specifically, and cancer.

Gov. Phil Scott has suggested capturing and selling phosphorus before it gets to the state's waterways and lakes.
VPR File

In his budget address on Tuesday, Gov. Phil Scott suggested Vermont should turn lemons into lemonade by capturing the phosphorous flowing into our waterways - and selling it.

Would that work? We’re talking about whether the suggestion is feasible, how phosphorus could be separated out and what the economics of the idea might look like.

Gov. Scott delivered his 2018 budget address before a joint session of the Vermont Legislature.
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

Calling for consensus to avoid a property tax increase, Gov. Phil Scott's budget address outlined his spending priorities and principles for the coming year.

Vermont Edition digs into the details of just what the governor is proposing with his new budget, and how the math works out to pay for it without raising taxes or fees.

We're talking about what Vermont's marijuana laws could mean for employment and drug testing.
edwardolive / iStock

Gov. Phil Scott has signed Vermont's marijuana legalization bill into law. We're looking at what it could mean for workers, employers and drug test policies.

Sen. Patrick Leahy D-Vt., questions Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018, in Washington.
Jose Luis Magana / AP

Sen. Patrick Leahy was one of a minority of Senate Democrats to vote against the deal to reopen the government. He joined Vermont Edition to tell us why.

Samuel John / Flickr

Why does it get quieter when it snows? Can there actually be thunder and lightning during a snow storm? And how can smog and flooding happen in the dead of winter?

These questions cover just a few of the winter weather phenomena that Vermont Edition is looking into.

More than 100,000 Vermont workers don't have a workplace reitrement plan, according to AARP estimates.
USA-Reiseblogger / Pixabay

As many as 45 percent of Vermont private-sector workers don't have a retirement plan through their employer. To help Vermonters save — and to reduce reliance on public services when Vermonters go to retire — State Treasurer Beth Pearce is in the final phases of launching a new retirement plan aimed at Vermont's self-employed and those working for small businesses.

Sabina Hahn / Circle Round

Instead of an episode of But Why, we're going to check out an episode of one of our other favorite podcasts.

Circle Round is a storytelling show from WBUR, a public radio station in Boston. On Circle Round, they find stories from all around the world and then get really interesting people to act them out.

This week we're sharing one of their episodes with you! This is one of our favorites. And it's actually about sharing. It's called 'The Lion's Whisker.'

mohamed_hassan / Pixabay

Vermont Attorney General TJ Donovan has joined a lawsuit challenging the Federal Communications Commission's rollback of so-called “net neutrality” regulations. 

A new report finds enforcement of health and safety standards lacking in Vermont's rental homes.
Creative Commons / Pixabay

A third of Vermonters rent their homes, but a new report on substandard housing shows Vermont's aging rental stock and tight rental market can lead to poor health and few options for those facing health or safety violations in their rentals.

Vermont Edition looks at what happens when a rental problem becomes a health hazard, and why it can be so difficult to get it fixed.

Northwest State Correctional Facility, shown in this 2008 file photo, would be closed as part of the new proposal.
Toby Talbot / AP File

The Agency of Human Services has released a plan for a massive new “campus-style” facility in northwestern Vermont that could reshape the state’s mental health and corrections systems. We’re talking about the proposal and how it would work.

A proposal to create a sanctioned space in Burlington where heroin users can inject drugs safely does not have the support of the city's police chief.

Pages