Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound. In 2016 she started the nationally recognized But Why, which takes questions from kids all over the world and finds interesting people to answer them.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service. Her hobbies include photography, nature writing and wandering the woods and fields of New England. She lives in Monkton.

House Minority Leader Don Turner (R-Milton) is seeking the office of Lieutenant Governor in Vermont's Nov. 6 general election.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

Republican Don Turner represents Milton in the Vermont legislature, and now the House Minority Leader is running for Lieutenant Governor in the Nov. 6 general election. We're talking to the candidate about why he's seeking the state's second-highest office.

Where are all these squirrels coming from?!
Dgwildlife / iStock

Throughout the Northeast, including parts of Vermont, it seems like there are a lot of squirrels around. Both live squirrels, squirreling around the woods and our yards, as well as dead squirrels dotting the roads. 

But is there really a squirrel population boom going on (spoiler alert: there is)? Where is it coming from?

Were talking about mental health care strategies for the challenges faced by rural areas of the state.
Decaseconds / flickr

Rural areas of the state face heightened challenges when it comes to mental health and mental health care: from spread-out populations to poverty, stigma and limited resources. We're talking about the strategies used by the designated agencies that provide care in these areas to increase access to care and help the people who need it most. 

"Vermont Edition" explores overlooked, unknown, obscure or unusual gems of Vermont art, like Eden artist Matt Neckers' miniature mobile museum that recreates (on a smaller scale) the look and feel of a contemporary art museum.
Matt Neckers

There's no shortage of acclaimed art in well-known museums across Vermont, but surprising works are tucked away in unexpected places, in galleries off the beaten path or hidden in plain sight in buildings, campuses and towns across the state. We're talking about overlooked, unexpected and unknown art in Vermont and where you can find it.

Right before a monarch emerges, its chrysalis goes from green to translucent. Scroll through the slideshow to see it emerge.
KT Thalin / courtesy

When KT Thalin bought a rural home with some land in Saxtons River, Vermont, 14 years ago, she thought it might be nice to have monarch butterflies flitting around her yard in the summertime. So she started encouraging the growth of milkweed, the sole food source for monarch caterpillars and the host plant for monarch eggs.

Vermont's current use program allows working forest and agricultrual land to be taxed at a much lower rate.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press/File

In 1980, the state rolled out a program that would allow agricultural and forest land to be taxed for its use rather than its market value. The current use program has gone through some changes over its almost-four-decade life. Vermont Edition explains the complexities of current use.

Death doulas provide coordination and compassionate care to patients at the end of their lives. We're talking to the developer of UVM's professional trainining program for death doulas.
Squaredpixels / iStock

You may be familiar with the doulas who assist women before, during and after childbirth. There's also a growing movement of death doulas: who provide compassionate care to people at the end of their lives. We're talking about what that support entails and what's fundamental about being a doula.

Logo for JOLTED, a five-part podcast about a school shooting that didn't happen, the line between thought and crime, and a Republican governor in a rural state who changed his mind about gun laws.
Aaron Shrewsbury for VPR

JOLTED is a new five-part podcast from VPR about the averted school shooting at Fair Haven Union High School earlier this year, and how it led to Gov. Phil Scott’s unexpected reversal on gun control legislation.

The way villains are portrayed in fiction may help shape political views. We're talking about that, and other ways that entertainment can affect ideology.
Roger Murmann / flickr

Our politics and ideology are shaped by our upbringing and life experience, but a UVM political scientist says there may be another key component to what we believe and who we vote for: the fictional stories we're exposed to in books, movies, and television. We're talking about how entertainment can shape our politics - from Game of Thrones to House of Cards and The Hunger Games

The exterior of the Vermont Supreme Court building on State Street in Montpelier.
Matthew Smith / VPR

Legal and cultural norms regard sharing nude or indecent photos of someone without their consent as a violation of privacy. But when it's done to shame or humiliate that person, Vermont law says nonconsensual pornography—so-called "revenge porn"—is a crime. Now a Vermont Supreme Court ruling has overturned a lower court's decision, bolstering the state's law and deeming it constitutional.

Vermont's small-town ambulance departments, many run by volunteers, face increasing demands on time and resources. Some have even had to close their doors, including two departments in the Northeast Kingdom in the last year.
Andyqwe / iStock

Ambulance departments in rural areas of Vermont face growing costs and increasing demands of time and training. Some volunteer-run departments have been forced to close when those demands become too much to manage. We're looking at how Vermont's rural ambulance departments are meeting those challenges to make sure someone answers when Vermonters dial 911. 

 We're talking about the dangers of the synthetic opioid fentanyl and whether it's possible to overdose simply through skin contact. Experts say it is not.
Rick Bowmer / AP

Health officials in Vermont say that when someone dies of a drug overdose in the state, they fully expect it to involve the synthetic drug fentanyl. Fentanyl-related overdoses continue to rise, both in Vermont and nationwide. And reports about the potency and danger of fentanyl also continue to proliferate.

Philadelphia firefighter Lisa Desamour says a healthy curiosity about fire is a good thing, and kids should feel comfortable asking questions. But they also need to know basic fire safety.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

We visit Fireman's Hall Museum in Philadelphia and get answers to a dozen questions about fire from Philly firefighter Lisa Desamour. She tells us what fire is, why matches work to start fires, and why fire is often orange. Plus: how does water put out fire? How do smoke alarms work? Why do firefighters have Dalmations? 

Cartoonist Rachel Lindsay's first book is "RX," a graphic memoir of her struggles with bipolar mania.
Courtesy Rachel Lindsay

Hearing the travails of someone's mental health struggles is not easy. But Vermont cartoonist Rachel Lindsay has taken a different approach to sharing her story of living with bipolar disorder. She has told it in a new graphic novel called RX.

Rep. Kiah Morris, left, speaks at a podium during a Statehouse press conference about a racial justice bill back in March.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR File

Bennington Rep. Kiah Morris is speaking up about her decision not to seek re-election — and she said being the target of hate both online and in the real world played a factor in her decision to withdraw her candidacy. 

A new report collects accounts of alleged abuse at St. Joseph's Orphanage in Burlington. We're talking to the author of the report, which was published by BuzzFeed.
Wilson Ring / Associated Press

A new investigation from BuzzFeed News assembles allegations of horrifying abuse — possibly including murder — at a former Catholic orphanage in Burlington. We're talking to the report's author about what she uncovered.

Jim Condon speaking at Montpelier's Capitol Plaza Hotel.
Condon For Colchester website

Jim Condon, a prominent Vermont broadcaster and state representative for Colchester, died last week from esophageal cancer. He was 60 years old.

Wild parsnip can grow five or more feet tall. Its bright yellow flowers resemble Queen Anne's lace.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

Wild parsnip, aka "poison parsnip," has become ubiquitous in much of Vermont in the last decade, overrunning fields, highway medians and unkempt yards. But a group of intrepid Monkton residents are working at night to take on the invasive plant.

Winooski and Montpelier are exploring provisions that would allow their residents who aren't U.S. citizens to vote in local elections.
Jessamyn West / Flickr

There was a time when non-U.S. citizens could vote in elections where they resided in this country. But anti-immigrant feelings in the late 19th and early 20th century changed that. Winooski and Montpelier are now exploring ways to allowing their non-citizen residents to vote in local elections.

Vermont sends a handful of the 1,350 minors in state custody to out-of-state residential treatment programs for issues like mental health or substance abuse.
tarasov_vl / iStock

Vermont’s Department of Corrections has more than 200 prisoners serving their sentences in out-of-state prisons. But what about the roughly 1,350 juveniles in state custody?

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