Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

Ric Cengeri / VPR

Governor Phil Scott's educational priorities include providing equitable access to services and support for all students, preparing our children for the workforce, and ensuring proper support for the state's teachers. But how is that accomplished?

The Trump administration has said that the United States will be withdrawing funding for the United Nations Population Fund, or UNFPA – an organization that promotes family planning and maternal and child health around the world, and is supported voluntarily by various government contributions.

Diego Cervo / iStock

In the midst of a national discussion about whether the tech industry is welcoming to women, we're plugging into the local community and asking what's top of mind for women in tech.

SnowEx is a project helmed by three engineers from Dartmouth College's Thayer School of Engineering, and it aims to make it possible to get detailed and accurate snowpack measurements by satellite.

Matthew Brown / AP

Two executive orders recently signed by President Donald Trump could have big consequences for the nation's environment. The orders would rewrite the country's Clean Power Plan, eliminate the "social cost" of carbon, remove certain barriers to building coal-powered plants, and review vehicle fuel-efficiency standards.

EasyBuy4u / iStock

Did you know pianos have strings and hammers? We're learning all about instruments and how they use strings to make noises.

On Tuesday, the Vermont House was set to debate H.170 – a bill which would legalize small amounts of marijuana for possession and cultivation. But in a surprise move, at least to many observers, the bill did not get debated on the House floor.

Toby Talbot / AP

Renewables are booming, but a new report says that the electrical grid will continue to need other sources of power for the foreseeable future. We're checking in on the state of the grid.

For 20 years, one person has been at the helm of Vermont's non-profit statewide arts agency, but Alex Aldrich has decided to leave his post as executive director of the Vermont Arts Council.

Ric Cengeri / VPR

It was a blow to those dealing with the opiate abuse crisis when Maple Leaf Treatment Center in Underhill announced that it was closing temporarily in January. But the announcement in February that it was closing permanently and filing for bankruptcy was seismic.

As it stands, Vermont is one of three states in the country without any kind of ethics commission. At the end of February, a bill was approved by the Senate that would form one, along with addressing a number of other ethics issues.

Jesse Costa / WBUR

Three people arrested in Vermont by Immigration and Customs Enforcement had custody hearings in federal court in Boston Monday. Two of them were released on bail, but a third is being held in custody. We review what transpired and what happens next.

labuda / iStock

The prospects for legalization of marijuana face a big moment this week: the Vermont House will take up a floor debate over whether to legalize possession of some amounts of pot in Vermont.

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The effects of a mental illness almost always stretch beyond just one person. Being the family member of someone with a mental health condition comes with unique challenges, and providing support to a struggling loved one can be both draining and heartbreaking.

Law enforcement officers increasingly find themselves interacting with people in the midst of a mental health crisis.

A state law now requires all officers to get eight hours of training in how to deal with these kinds of situations. There's also an additional voluntary program some officers have enrolled in that is designed to train mental health workers and the police in how to work together in an emergency.

Fotofrankyat / iStock

It's not easy to watch anyone struggle with mental health issues, but it might be even more difficult to see children battle mental illness. According the National Institute of Mental Health, half of all lifetime cases of mental illness begin by age 14.

One thing common to many people with mental health conditions is that they can be helped by a strong support network of friends and family. But keeping those folks in the loop can be hard. And if doctors are involved, things can be complicated by a strict federal privacy law known as HIPAA.

vadimguzhva / iStock

Why is mental health so hard to talk about? If conditions like depression, anxiety, or even schizophrenia can have such massive impacts on people's lives, why can it feel like weakness to get help? We're continuing our week of mental health coverage by focusing in on the stigma around mental health, and how to move past it.

Copley Hospital

People who are suffering psychiatric episodes can end up in the emergency rooms of community hospitals, where doctors and nurses say they are not equipped to provide the treatment these patients need. As Vermont Edition begins a week-long exploration of mental health care in Vermont, we look at the problem of emergency psychiatric care.

bo1982 / istock

Why are there so many plants? How are seeds made? How does germination work? How can plants grow so big if they start from such a small seed? Why are flowers different colors? Why are plants and trees green? Where does dirt come from? In this episode of But Why, we're talking about plants with garden consultant Charlie Nardozzi.

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