Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

Nina Keck / VPR

People across Vermont and around the world have been transfixed by the immigration story that has unfolded in the last two weeks - and especially the impact on refugees. In the midst of it, VPR's Nina Keck was reporting on the Syrian refugee crisis from Jordan.

Vladone / iStockphoto.com

Quebec's far-right groups may not have played a direct role in a mosque shooting late last month, but some worry that extremist language is heating up and may be pushing some people to action.

VikaValter / iStock

It was such a major concern in 2014 that then-Governor Peter Shumlin devoted his entire State of the State address to the opiate addiction crisis. As a result, the state focused health department, treatment, and law enforcement resources at this growing problem.

Sam Gale Rosen / VPR

The rise of Airbnb has led to debates over how rented rooms should be taxed and regulated, and raised concerns about maintaining a level playing-field for traditional inns and bed-and-breakfasts. We're talking about the sharing economy's impact on Vermont tourism, and whether it's helping or hurting the hospitality industry as a whole. 

Kristina Ohl, courtesy

As part of their senior seminar, a group of Middlebury College students took a close look at the Vermont dairy industry. They looked into the issue of farm viability and related their findings in a series of three podcast episodes called CowTalk.

Patti Daniels / VPR

The legal fight continues over who can and can't enter the United States in the wake of the Trump administration's executive order on immigration and refugees. 

andy_Q / istock

Why do your fingers and toes turn wrinkly in the tub? Why are people ticklish? How do you get freckles? Why do some people have birthmarks? How do our hands feel things? Are humans animals? Why don't humans have tails? Why do we need food and water to survive? Why do our nose and ears keep growing? How do bones connect together? We're talking about our weird and wonderful bodies with Dr. Lori Racha, a pediatrician at the University of Vermont.

Taylor Dobbs / VPR

Vermont Representative Peter Welch says he will fight against President Trump's executive actions on immigration in Washington. We'll ask him what actions he plans to take, and we'll talk about his other priorities going forward in a deeply divided Congress. 

William Potter / iStock

It's a long list. Federal money flows into Vermont to fund a lot of things that you might or might not use everyday. Highways, libraries, school lunches, law enforcement, and wildlife restoration are just a few programs that are sustained by money from Washington.

Middlebury College, courtesy

Ata Anzali is an assistant professor of religion at Middlebury College and an Iranian citizen with a green card. He's been in Iran on sabbatical doing research, and he is now dealing with the issue of when to return to the United States with his wife and children.

Craig Ruttle / AP

President Donald Trump's far-reaching executive orders on immigration rocked the country last week, and the reaction has been widespread and furious.

Dede Cummings, courtesy

In his fictional Kingdom County, Vermont author Howard Frank Mosher brought to life the culture and landscape of the Northeast Kingdom. Beloved by Vermonters and beyond, Mosher's work stands as a testament to the power of storytelling.

Gov. Phil Scott made several recommendations about the state's corrections system in his budget address on Tuesday.

Vermont Department of Transportation

Vermonters have been getting their cars inspected since 1935. Some believe the system we've been using dates about that far back. But that's about to change.

Sarah George was sworn in last week as the new Chittenden County state's attorney – a seat that had been left vacant by the election of TJ Donovan as Vermont attorney general.

Angela Evancie / VPR

While Phil Scott was running for governor, he vowed to limit growth in the state's budget to the growth in the underlying economy.

Vermonters have now had an opportunity to see what Gov. Scott has in mind for the state.

PhotoBylove / iStock.com

The Vermont Department of Labor and the J. Warren & Lois McClure Foundation has updated its list of the top "high-pay, high-demand" jobs projected for Vermont over the next 10 years – and the educational requirements needed to obtain them.

Sam McNeil / AP

Rutland has been at the center of a national discussion about refugee resettlement for months now. Now, the first Syrian refugees have arrived. We're talking about Rutland in the national context, and about the situation in Syria that's brought us to this point. 

Amy Noyes / VPR

Saturday's Women's Marches on Montpelier and on Washington, D.C. drew crowds that surpassed expectations. An estimated 15,000 protesters descended on Vermont's Statehouse alone.

Jane Lindholm / VPR

How do popcorn kernels pop? How do salmon know where to return to spawn? How do rabbits change colors? Why does television fry your brain? How do zippers zip stuff? Who was the fastest runner in the world? In this episode, we'll tackle all these questions!

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