Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound. In 2016 she started the nationally recognized But Why, which takes questions from kids all over the world and finds interesting people to answer them.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service. Her hobbies include photography, nature writing and wandering the woods and fields of New England. She lives in Monkton.

Looking down a wing of closed doors at Camp Hill prison in Pennsylvania
Marc Levy / Associated Press file

Vermont's prisons — and how the state treats its incarcerated — has been the focus of scrutiny, possible expansion, and proposed reform. We're talking with Corrections Commissioner Lisa Menard about those reforms, potentially expanding state facilities and the status of Vermonters incarcerated in other states.

Don Jones flew missions into North Vietnam in Misty F-100s during the Vietnam War.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Don Jones is a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel who is 91 years old and lives in Middlesex. He was one of just 157 pilots who flew the Misty F-100 missions into North Vietnam between 1967 and 1970. These planes were low-flying aircraft crewed by two pilots charged with finding targets for other fighters to attack.

Vermont's three major parties hold their primaries on August 14th.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

The results of Tuesday's primary are in - most of them, anyway. Democratic candidate Christine Hallquist will face incumbent Republican Gov. Phil Scott in November. Peter Welch and Bernie Sanders both won the Democratic nomination for the seats they already hold, though Sen. Sanders will turn down that nomination and run as an independent. 

Novelist Anna Katharine Green, top left, and her late 1800s novels like "The Leavenworth Case" and "Marked Personal" created the template of modern detective fiction.
Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

You may have never heard of the novelist Anna Katharine Green. But if you’ve ever read a detective novel, or followed the sleuthing exploits of Sherlock Holmes, Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple or even Inspector Gamache—you’ve been enjoying the countless authors who followed in Green’s footsteps.

The Passumpsic River overflowed its banks in 2002, washing out roads and flooding homes in and around Lyndonville in 2002.
Vermont Emergency Management, courtesy

Flooding is Vermont’s most frequent and costly natural disaster, but seven years after the devastation of Tropical Storm Irene, just how ready are homeowners and towns for future floods? We're talking about the threat of flooding in Vermont and planning for flood resilience.

Book lovers, get ready for a slew of reading suggestions on "Vermont Edition."
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Think of all the people you've met, places you've traveled, dishes you've tasted. All in the pages of the books you've read. Vermont Edition presents our summer reading show to introduce you to more new worlds by offering a tome of book recommendations.

Angela Evancie / VPR

You know the feeling. You’re driving along, somewhere in Vermont, and you turn onto a road with an intriguing name. And you wonder where it came from.

Melody Bodette / VPR

Why do turtles need shells and why do they move so slowly? Why do frogs hop? Why are frogs green? Are colorful frogs poisonous? Why do frogs inflate their throats? What are some of the biggest threats to amphibians and reptiles? We wade into a Vermont pond with herpetologists Jim Andrews and Kate Kelly! We also get a preview of the new Earth Rangers podcast.

Manchester real estate broker Lawrence Zupan is one of four Republicans vying to win the party’s nomination for U.S. Senate.
courtesy Lawrence Zupan

Lawrence Zupan is a Manchester-area real estate broker and self-described “political novice” who’s one of four candidates to be the Republican nominee to the U.S. Senate. We're talking to him about his background, experience and what he would aim to achieve as Vermont's junior senator.

An image of the Vermont state flag.
btgbtg / iStock.com

A new VPR-Vermont PBS Poll out Monday takes the pulse of Vermonters ahead of the upcoming 2018 elections. We're digging into the poll results and looking at what issues Vermonters say are most important.

A telescope on a tripod pointed up toward a night sky.
ClaudioVentrella / iStock

But Why explores the Big Bang, earth, stars and black holes in this call-in episode that aired live on Vermont Public Radio. Astronomer John O'Meara tackles the big bang, the origins of the universe and how we know humans landed on the moon. Plus, why is the earth round? What is space made out of? How are stars formed? Why do the stars shine so bright? What's beyond space?  How long does it take to get to outer space? Will humans ever be able to go to Mars?

Cellist Zoe Keating has released her first new EP in nearly a decade.
Chase Jarvis / Courtesy of the Artist

With the help of a computer and foot pedal, cellist and composer Zoe Keating layers and loops her music to create a symphony out of one solo cello. After experiencing intense grief, she says her music also helped her discover new possibilities.

So far, more than 250 schools have applied for state grant money to improve their security infrastructure.
Kameleon007 / iStock

This spring, the state conducted a wide ranging survey on the security of its schools in response to an alleged attempted school shooting and allocated $4 million in grants for those schools to improve their security. Now the money is available and grant applications have been pouring in.

Stern campaign, courtesy

Keith Stern is the lone Republican challenger to incumbent governor Phil Scott in the party's Aug. 14 primary. Stern has criticized Scott's support for Vermont's new gun control laws and vowed to undo some of them. We're talking to Stern as part of VPR's ongoing interviews with statewide and federal candidates.

Fernald's Cuckoo Bumblebee, Bombus fernaldae, spotted by a Vermont iNaturalist user in July 2018.
beeboy / iNaturalist

Researchers are surveying bumblebees at four northeast National Wildlife Refuges in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maine and Vermont this summer. During the Vermont survey in the Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge in Swanton, surveyors say they made an unusual find: a bumblebee that's only been seen twice before in Vermont.

UVM Medical Center nurses spent two days striking last week. We'll hear about where negotiations between the union and hospital now stand.
Ari Snider / VPR

The nurses union at UVM Medical Center went on a two-day strike last week after their contract expired and no new agreement was reached. We'll hear from both sides about the negotiations taking place on a new three-year contract.

We're talking to François Clemmons about his barrier-breaking role on "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood" and the rest of his career.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

If you've seen the new documentary about Mr. Rogers you'll recognize François Clemmons for his memorable role as Officer Clemmons on Mister Rogers' Neighborhood - making him one of the first African-American actors with a recurring role on kids' TV. We're talking to him about his life and work, including a prolific singing career and the last few decades he's spent in Middlebury, Vermont.

Henry and wife Joanna Weinstock shared their story with VPR's Ric Cengeri.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Jericho's Henry Weinstock survived the Nazi occupation of Belgium during World War II before coming to the U.S. with his father in 1946. The son of a secular Jewish family, he credits his survival during the war as much to the compassion of Belgian nuns as to sheer luck.

Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard at a meeting with U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue in June 2018.
Lance Cheung / U.S. Department of Agriculture

Vermont and Quebec have an important relationship in the region, but it exists in the larger context of U.S.-Canada relations. As those ties become increasingly complicated, we're talking with Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard about border issues, refugees, U.S.-Canada relations and more.

Nurses strike outside of the UVM Medical Center on Main Street in Burlington during the first day of a planned two-day strike.
Ari Snider / VPR

A strike by unionized nurses at UVM Medical Center over wages and staffing entered its second day Friday with hundreds set to return to picket lines and no clear timeline for when negotiations for a new contract would resume. 

Pages