Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound. In 2016 she started the nationally recognized But Why, which takes questions from kids all over the world and finds interesting people to answer them.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service. Her hobbies include photography, nature writing and wandering the woods and fields of New England. She lives in Monkton.

We're talking with energy experts and environmental advocates about assessing "renewability" when it comes to renewable energy.
DrAfter123 / iStock

Vermont is striving to meet ambitious goals to get 90 percent of its energy from renewable sources by 2050. But just how renewable is some of that energy? We're talking with energy experts and environmental advocates about how we assess renewability and other environmental costs to alternative energy sources.

The state is expanding its system of year-round dropboxes for prescription drugs.
Oxford / iStock

The state is expanding a program to get unused prescription drugs out of medicine cabinets - adding state police barracks to the list of dozens of sites for year-round dropboxes in police and sheriff's departments across Vermont. We’re talking about how available unused drugs can contribute to the opioid epidemic, plus the environmental impacts of discarded pharmaceuticals.

http://digital.vpr.net/post/top-state-health-official-containing-vermonts-health-care-costs
Jane Lindholm / VPR

You don't have to be an adult to be an expert in something. In fact, sometimes kids are the best teachers, especially when it comes to skills that require adults to use muscles they may not have tried flexing in a couple of decades. In this Summer School lesson, we learn how to climb a tree from Hinesburg 10-year-old Jack Kiedaisch.

A Vermont man charged with murder is arguing the 10th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution should protect him from facing the death penalty.
Michal Chodyra / iStock

Donald Fell was convicted in federal court of kidnapping Teresca King in Rutland in 2000 and killing her in New York state. He was sentenced to death, but his conviction was overturned due to juror misconduct.

As Fell awaits a new trial, his attorneys are working to avoid the possibility of him facing the death penalty again with unique arguments against The Federal Death Penalty Act, including one invoking the 10th Amendment to the Constitution.

Voter turnout for last Tuesday's primary election was a surprising 22.5 percent.
Bob Kinzel / VPR FILE

Before last Tuesday, many people were expecting the turnout for Vermont's 2018 primary elections to be low. Primaries during non-presidential election years are often lethargic. But when Secretary of State Jim Condos officially certified the primary election results, 22.5 percent of the state's registered voters made their voices heard. That might sound dismally low, but it's actually the second-highest primary vote total ever.

There are growing opportunities for Vermont's forestland owners in the global carbon markets.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Vermont has been part of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative for about a decade. But with emerging carbon markets, the state can play a role in California's move to meet its greenhouse gas reduction goals as well as those of foreign companies. We'll learn about these markets and efforts to include Vermont landowners.

Christy Mihaly's first illustrated book for children is a rhyming picture book about making hay.
Holiday House publishers, courtesy

Vermont’s farms are the stuff of legend. The iconic barn, the determined farmer, the sturdy tractor and fresh-cut fields bursting with towering bales of hay. But you wouldn't be the first to realize — hey, there are no stories about hay!

East Calais author Christy Mihaly's new illustrated children's book aims to fill that gap in your child's bookshelf.

Dan French has worked in Vermont schools for more than 20 years. He took over the job of Secretary of Education on Monday, Aug. 13, 2018.
Vermont Agency of Education, courtesy

Dan French took over the job of Vermont's Secretary of Education just last week, but he's no stranger to the state's schools: he's taught in the Northeast Kingdom and worked as a superintendent in Southern Vermont for nearly a decade.

We're talking with the state's new education secretary about merging districts, shrinking enrollment and his vision for Vermont’s schools. 

The mural in Burlington reflects 400 years of Vermont history but has drawn criticism for lacking diversity.
Adam Fagen / Flickr

The mural should move: that's one of several recommendations from a seven-member task force convened by the Burlington City Council to look at the controversy surrounding the Everyone Loves A Parade! mural on Leahy Way, just off of Burlington's Church Street pedestrian thoroughfare. 

The border crossing at Derby Line, Vermont and Stanstead, Quebec is one of several separating the U.S. and Canada.
Charles Krupa / Associated Press/File

The border at the 45th parallel separates two countries but also unites the cultures of Vermont and Quebec. Many families have relatives on both sides of the border, so changes in transportation services on one side also affect the other. We're looking at some of the changes in rail, road and air travel in Vermont and Quebec.

A national study commissioned by the Annie E. Casey Foundation found that children who aren't proficiency by third grade are four times less likely to graduate high school.
Tolgart / iStock

Literacy is typically thought of as the ability to read and write, but experts say it’s a much broader skill set, encompassing vocabulary, storytelling and more.  We look at early childhood literacy and what’s being done in Vermont to get children ready to read, write and communicate well before they reach school age.

Many different musical instruments
Katsiaryna Pleshakova / iSt

In this episode of But Why, we hear music from Music for Sprouts' Mr. Chris, Drummer Seny Daffe, and cellist Emily Taubl and answer questions about strings, percussion, and the magic of music itself. Get ready to dance.

Tim Kavanagh turned his rectal cancer diagnosis into a one man comedy show.
Tim Kavanagh, courtesy

Tim Kavanagh is a Vermont-based entertainer who's worked on variety shows, stage productions and improv comedy. When he was diagnosed with rectal cancer, he applied that humor to his diagnosis, treatment and surgeries to create what he calls his "self-defecating, one-man comedy show."

Looking down a wing of closed doors at Camp Hill prison in Pennsylvania
Marc Levy / Associated Press file

Vermont's prisons — and how the state treats its incarcerated — has been the focus of scrutiny, possible expansion, and proposed reform. We're talking with Corrections Commissioner Lisa Menard about those reforms, potentially expanding state facilities and the status of Vermonters incarcerated in other states.

Don Jones flew missions into North Vietnam in Misty F-100s during the Vietnam War.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Don Jones is a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel who is 91 years old and lives in Middlesex. He was one of just 157 pilots who flew the Misty F-100 missions into North Vietnam between 1967 and 1970. These planes were low-flying aircraft crewed by two pilots charged with finding targets for other fighters to attack.

Vermont's three major parties hold their primaries on August 14th.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

The results of Tuesday's primary are in - most of them, anyway. Democratic candidate Christine Hallquist will face incumbent Republican Gov. Phil Scott in November. Peter Welch and Bernie Sanders both won the Democratic nomination for the seats they already hold, though Sen. Sanders will turn down that nomination and run as an independent. 

Novelist Anna Katharine Green, top left, and her late 1800s novels like "The Leavenworth Case" and "Marked Personal" created the template of modern detective fiction.
Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

You may have never heard of the novelist Anna Katharine Green. But if you’ve ever read a detective novel, or followed the sleuthing exploits of Sherlock Holmes, Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple or even Inspector Gamache—you’ve been enjoying the countless authors who followed in Green’s footsteps.

The Passumpsic River overflowed its banks in 2002, washing out roads and flooding homes in and around Lyndonville in 2002.
Vermont Emergency Management, courtesy

Flooding is Vermont’s most frequent and costly natural disaster, but seven years after the devastation of Tropical Storm Irene, just how ready are homeowners and towns for future floods? We're talking about the threat of flooding in Vermont and planning for flood resilience.

Book lovers, get ready for a slew of reading suggestions on "Vermont Edition."
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Think of all the people you've met, places you've traveled, dishes you've tasted. All in the pages of the books you've read. Vermont Edition presents our summer reading show to introduce you to more new worlds by offering a tome of book recommendations.

Angela Evancie / VPR

You know the feeling. You’re driving along, somewhere in Vermont, and you turn onto a road with an intriguing name. And you wonder where it came from.

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