Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound. In 2016 she started the nationally recognized But Why, which takes questions from kids all over the world and finds interesting people to answer them.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service. Her hobbies include photography, nature writing and wandering the woods and fields of New England. She lives in Monkton.

What's blockchain? The unqiue computer network is a new piece of financial technology that Vermont lawmakers believe offers big opportunities for the state.
MF3d / iStock

Bitcoin. Cryptocurrency. These and other buzzwords make headlines in the world of finance, but underlying it all is a new piece of financial technology called blockchain. And state lawmakers are betting this new technology could be Vermont's next moneymaker, much like the state's captive insurance market.

The Vermont Legislature is looking for ways to shift the educational fund burden from property taxes to income taxes. H.911 includes legislation that would spell out how that can be accomplsihed.
ParkerDeen / iStock

Ask any legislator in Montpelier and they'll probably agree that getting the state's education funding model right could be their most difficult task. Now a bill passed by the House sets about shifting some of the burden of paying for our schools from property taxes to income taxes.

Vermont's psychiatrist shortage is making it hard for people to get the care that they need.
vadimguzhva / iStock

Vermont's shortage of psychiatrists means it can be incredibly difficult for people to get the mental health care they need. We're talking about the problem, the impact and possible solutions.

Greg Sharrow, right, interviews Burmese weaving instructor True Tender Htun as she demonstrators the use of homemade looms she used in Burma and now in Vermont.
Vermont Folklife Center, courtesy

The idea of “folklore” may conjure stories we tell children about mythical creatures, explanations of unique family traditions, or even mysteries of the natural world. But for Greg Sharrow, folklore was how people forged a sense of who they are. 

Sharrow dedicated three decades of work with the Vermont Folklife Center to documenting, celebrating, and illuminating folklore and folk arts in Vermont. He died Monday, April 2.

"Super Troopers 2" is being released on April 20.
Courtesy Fox Searchlight

What may be the best-known movie set in our state features syrup-chugging Vermont state troopers and several mustaches. Now, after 17 years, it has a sequel. We're talking to three members of the Broken Lizard comedy troupe, the stars of Super Troopers, and now, Super Troopers 2.

A February 1798 political cartoon portraying Matthew Lyon (holding tongs) attacking Connecticut Congressman Roger Griswold. After Griswold called Lyon a scoundrel, Lyon spat on Griswold's face and their brawl ensued.
Library of Congress American Cartoon Prints Collection / Wikimedia Commons

Vermont history buffs may know the name Matthew Lyon, but a Burlington singer-songwriter hopes to make the rowdy Vermont statesman more of a household name by making him the focus of a full-length musical.

Vermont's small colleges and universities face growing challenges as enrollment drops across the state and region.
Photobuay / iStock

College enrollment is down across New England. We're looking at how Vermont's small private and state colleges are adjusting to fewer students, rising costs, and growing competition for tuition dollars.

Melody A / iStock

Why do we laugh? Why do you feel ticklish when someone tickles you? Why can't you tickle yourself? We learn about how humor develops with Gina Mireault of the Infant Laughter Project at Northern Vermont University.

But Why will be live at WBUR Boston's Mega Awesome Super Huge Wicked Fun Podcast Playdate Sunday, April 29! Here's how to come by and check us out!

Handy with the lot of these? Then you're in high demand for the "Repair Cafe" scheduled for April 28 in Hardwick.
anilakkus / iStock

If you fancy yourself a Mr. or Ms. Fix-It, or maybe you're more of a "Need a Ms. Fix-It" kind of person, we've got a matchmaking event for you! 

The Central Vermont Solid Waste Management District, the Onion River Exchange and the Center for an Agricultural Economy are working together to host a Repair Cafe in Hardwick at the end of April.

Jack Moulton succeeds Jeff Bartley as the Vermont Republican Party's executive director.
Vermont Republican Party, Courtesy

The Vermont Republican Party has a new executive director. Jack Moulton replaced Jeff Bartley, who stepped down suddenly in January after three years in the position.

A Drug Free School Zone sign on a chain link fence with a playground in the background.
duckycards / iStock

As the state continues to battle the opioid abuse crisis, ways of fighting it have taken many different forms — including focusing on drug prevention strategies in our schools.

On this Vermont Edition, we look around the state to learn what's being done to deliver that anti-drug message to our kids and also look at the effectiveness of these efforts.

The ACLU in several states is requesting that Greyhound stop allowing the border patrol to board their buses.
Appaloosa / Flickr

The U.S. Customs and Border patrol, pointing to federal law, says it has the right to board and conduct warrantless searches in any vehicle within a hundred miles of the U.S. border. Given Vermont's small size and its northern border with Canada, that means that a significant portion of Vermont falls within that zone. The ACLU of Vermont has joined the chapters of several states asking Greyhound to stop allowing agents to board its buses and ask passengers questions about their citizenship.

We're talking about food tourism in Vermont: how it's changing and what it means for the state.
Mark Goebel / Flickr

Vermont's farms and food-and-drink producers are pitching themselves to tourists - not just as the source of what's on the table, but as destinations in their own right. We're talking about food tourism, how it fits into the state's economy, and whom it benefits.

Hazing in sports can have devastating effects on athletes, schools and communities.
mmac72 / iStock

Hazing is happening in greater numbers than you might suspect. One recent study reported that 80 percent of student athletes experienced some form of hazing during their college athletic career. And 42 percent said they also were hazed in high school.

A team at Norwich University has designed a solar power supply system for use on Mars.
European Space Agency / Flickr

A five-member team of students from Norwich University won a prestigious design competition hosted by NASA.

The mural in Burlington reflects 400 years of Vermont history but has drawn criticism for lacking diversity.
Adam Fagen / Flickr

The mural that graces Leahy Way off of Church Street in Burlington is arresting. It's 120 feet by 14 feet and depicts a 400-year timeline. It's brightly-colored and loaded with many of Vermont's historical figures. And it lacks diversity. So what should the city do with it now?

Seth Perlman / AP

After the arrest of a man who was allegedly planning to inflict mass casualties at Fair Haven High School in February, Gov. Phil Scott changed his long-time opposition to increased gun control. Gov. Scott said he wanted to see several pieces of firearms legislation on his desk by Town Meeting Day. That deadline has come and gone.

"The Battle of the Greeks and Trojans for the Corpse of Patroclus" by Antoine Wiertz
Wikimedia Commons

The stories of The Iliad and The Odyssey are separated from us by a gap of thousands of years. But they continue to have relevance to those who have lived through modern warfare. We're connecting with a veterans-only class at UVM that's studying and discussing the works of Homer - and how those ancient epics resonate with today's warriors.

An empty school hallway with a row of lockers and a door at the end.
Halbergman / iStock

After the shooting in Parkland, Florida, and a threat of violence at Fair Haven Union High School, Gov. Phil Scott has called for safety assessments of Vermont's schools by the end of March. Scott has also requested $5 million over this year and next year to pay for security upgrades for schools.

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