Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

Courtesy of Nancy Stearns Bercaw

Nancy Stearns Bercaw is a Vermonter and a championship swimmer who struggled for years with alcohol addiction. She found a path to recovery in an unlikely – and very dry – place: Abu Dhabi. 

Elaine Thompson / AP

If you had to pay a fee whenever you needed a plastic bag at the checkout, would it prompt you to remember a reusable bag? What if plastic bags were altogether banned? On the next Vermont Edition, we look at different efforts to reduce flimsy plastic bags.

In the wake of the EB-5 scandal that broke a year ago this week, Newport was left with a big hole in the ground where Ariel Quiros and Bill Stenger had planned to build a block of office space, restaurants and other mixed uses.

White and Burke is a firm that's been hired to evaluate the "Renaissance Block" that was supposed to be developed with EB-5 money, and David White spoke to Vermont Edition about it on Tuesday.

Lisa Rathke / AP

A year ago this week, a wide-reaching scandal was revealed in the Northeast Kingdom surrounding the federal EB-5 program. That damage from the alleged fraud is still unfolding, and new developments continue to surface, including a new lawsuit filed against Jay Peak's former parent company.

Outline of Vermont on top of collage of $1 bills.
Vepar5 / iStock.com

Every year, the state budget is the one must-pass piece of legislation for lawmakers and the governor. But getting to agreement on the budget is fraught with philosophical differences and competing priorities.

Some of the United States' highest military and diplomatic priorities intersect in the Syrian conflict – the aggression of ISIS, the stability of the Middle East, our relationship with Russia and, more broadly, the role the U.S. intends to have in international relations.

Robert Ford was U.S. ambassador to Syria from 2011 to 2014, and now lives in St. Johnsbury. Ford spoke to Vermont Edition on Thursday to share his observations on the conflict in Syria, including a recent deadly chemical attack on a Syrian town.

ktsimage / iStock

What does it mean - legally - to be a parent?  The answer to that question is changing with shifting culture and technology. We're looking at the new face of parenthood, and at how the legal framework is struggling to keep up.

Volcan Lanin in the background as a bicycle and car travel the road below.
Cameron Russell, courtesy

The Spanish phrase "Mundo Pequeño" means "small world," and it's also the name and the mission of a massive undertaking by three cyclists from our region. 

Ric Cengeri / VPR

Governor Phil Scott's educational priorities include providing equitable access to services and support for all students, preparing our children for the workforce, and ensuring proper support for the state's teachers. But how is that accomplished?

The Trump administration has said that the United States will be withdrawing funding for the United Nations Population Fund, or UNFPA – an organization that promotes family planning and maternal and child health around the world, and is supported voluntarily by various government contributions.

Diego Cervo / iStock

In the midst of a national discussion about whether the tech industry is welcoming to women, we're plugging into the local community and asking what's top of mind for women in tech.

SnowEx is a project helmed by three engineers from Dartmouth College's Thayer School of Engineering, and it aims to make it possible to get detailed and accurate snowpack measurements by satellite.

Matthew Brown / AP

Two executive orders recently signed by President Donald Trump could have big consequences for the nation's environment. The orders would rewrite the country's Clean Power Plan, eliminate the "social cost" of carbon, remove certain barriers to building coal-powered plants, and review vehicle fuel-efficiency standards.

EasyBuy4u / iStock

Did you know pianos have strings and hammers? We're learning all about instruments and how they use strings to make noises.

On Tuesday, the Vermont House was set to debate H.170 – a bill which would legalize small amounts of marijuana for possession and cultivation. But in a surprise move, at least to many observers, the bill did not get debated on the House floor.

Toby Talbot / AP

Renewables are booming, but a new report says that the electrical grid will continue to need other sources of power for the foreseeable future. We're checking in on the state of the grid.

For 20 years, one person has been at the helm of Vermont's non-profit statewide arts agency, but Alex Aldrich has decided to leave his post as executive director of the Vermont Arts Council.

Ric Cengeri / VPR

It was a blow to those dealing with the opiate abuse crisis when Maple Leaf Treatment Center in Underhill announced that it was closing temporarily in January. But the announcement in February that it was closing permanently and filing for bankruptcy was seismic.

As it stands, Vermont is one of three states in the country without any kind of ethics commission. At the end of February, a bill was approved by the Senate that would form one, along with addressing a number of other ethics issues.

Jesse Costa / WBUR

Three people arrested in Vermont by Immigration and Customs Enforcement had custody hearings in federal court in Boston Monday. Two of them were released on bail, but a third is being held in custody. We review what transpired and what happens next.

Pages