Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound. In 2016 she started the nationally recognized But Why, which takes questions from kids all over the world and finds interesting people to answer them.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service. Her hobbies include photography, nature writing and wandering the woods and fields of New England. She lives in Monkton.

Matt Lloyd is scheduled to donate a kidney to his wife, Brandi, who has a genetic condition that leads to kidney failure.
Courtesy Brandi and Matt Lloyd

Tuesday, May 15, 2018, is a day that Brandi and Matt Lloyd have been waiting for a long time.

That's the day the couple, from Mooers, New York, are scheduled to undergo surgery. Matt will go first and have one of his kidneys removed. Then Brandi's surgery will follow.

Her diseased kidneys will be removed and Matt's donor kidney will be placed in her body. If all goes well, they should each have one functioning kidney by the end of the day and be on their way to recovery.

Newly exiled Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn in Kazakhstan in 1953 (left); Solzhenitsyn  with his sons in Cavendish in August 1976; Solzhenitsyn at his self-made writing table in Cavendish during the 1980s.
Cavendish Historical Society, courtesy

His novels earned him the 1970 Nobel Prize in literature and exile from the Soviet Union, but in Vermont Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn is also know for the nearly 20 years he lived and worked in the town of Cavendish. We're looking at the Russian writer's works, his time in the state and what his novels say to readers in 2018.

John Billingsley / VPR

How do owls eat? Why are owls nocturnal and how do they see in the dark? How do owls swivel their heads all the way around? Why do birds move their heads back and forth when they walk?

This episode was recorded live at The Mega Awesome Super Huge Wicked Fun Podcast Playdate in Brookline, Massachusetts.

"The Long Shadow" by Beth Kanell is set in the Northeast Kingdom in the run-up to the Civil War.
images courtesy of Beth Kanell

A new historical novel geared to a teenage audience tells the story of a young woman in the Northeast Kingdom in the run-up to the Civil War. Author Beth Kanell says she wrote the novel in part to challenge Vermonters on how they think about the state's history in relation to slavery. 

Facing a $58 million funding gap, Vermont lawmakers and the governor have competing proposals to pay for Vermont's schools in the final weeks of the legislative session.
Miatagirl / iStock

How will Vermont fund its schools? Gov. Scott's new plan would use nearly $60 million dollars in one-time funds to keep property taxes down, but Democrats in the legislature balked at a plan they say has a number of problems. 

As the incidence of Lyme disease and other tick-borne illnesses rises, we're talking about the growing risk and what may happen next.
Erik Karits / iStock.com

The CDC is warning of a spike in tick-borne diseases nationwide. Here in Vermont, Lyme disease is a huge and growing problem, and increasingly, other tick-borne illnesses like anaplasmosis and Powassan virus are a threat as well.

A family photo of Suzanne Bombardier, the 14-year-old victim of a 1980 cold case murder.
Antioch Police Department

People around the country have been fascinated by the story of the Golden State Killer, the research by the late true-crime writer Michelle McNamara, and the arrest of a suspect in the decades-long mystery back in April. But one Vermont College of Fine Arts student's writing about a different California cold case generated interest of its own that caught investigator's attention and eventually an arrest.

LGBTQ Vermonters can face unique challenges and needs in rural areas.
ukayacan / iStock

Vermont has been seen as a leader in equal rights for LGBTQ people, but queer Vermonters living in rural areas can face unique challenges, from accessing healthcare to aging well as a queer senior to finding support networks. We're talking about the needs and experiences of LGBTQ Vermonters in rural communities. 

A Great Blue Heron spotted on Lake Champlain with a small trout for breakfast.
Rob Swanson

Lately, you may have had the experience of waking in the wee hours of the morning to a cacophonous symphony of bird chirps and calls: a telltale sign that spring migration is in full swing and our feathered friends are returning to Vermont.

Now that they're here, it's time for Vermont Edition's spring bird show.

Vermont author Kimberly Harrington writes about the intersection of parenthood, work and social media in her new memoir.
Isaac Wasuck

Towards the beginning of her new book of essays, Vermont author Kimberly Harrington includes a short satirical piece titled "Just What I Wanted, a Whole Twenty-Four Hours of Recognition Once a Year." It's a good read for this time of year, as we approach the beloved/dreaded holiday known as Mother's Day. (It's Sunday, May 13, in case you were wondering.)

Contra and other forms of country dance have a lasting appeal. We're talking about the history behind the tradition.
Sterling College / Flickr

It's a centuries-old tradition with a wild history and deep New England roots. We're talking about American country dancing, including contra dance. We'll hear from the author of a book that traces the story of this tradition, and we'll talk about how and why it still appeals to so many people today.

Jack Sawyer in Vermont Superior Court.
Ryan Mercer / The Burlington Free Press via Associated Press, Pool File

In February, Jack Sawyer was accused of a thwarted shooting plot involving Fair Haven Union High School. Already the case against the 18-year-old Poultney man has taken many twists and turns. We'll look at what has transpired so far in the case and how it's grabbed the attention of the entire state.

Coprid / istock

Why is tape sticky? How do erasers erase? We'll tackle arts and crafts in this episode, answering not just those two questions but learning how to make paint out of rocks and spit!! Vermont artist and wildcrafter Nick Neddo joins us with some tips on how to create your own paint and art supplies.

Christina Nolan
VPR

U.S. Attorney for the District of Vermont Christina Nolan says the opioid crisis—including related violence and human trafficking—is a top priority for her office, one she says will emphasize prosecutions to reduce the amount of opioids in the state.

Kids, parents and schools all are still figuring out how to deal with the increased connectivity offered by smartphones and social media.
milicad / iStock

Kids are growing up amidst the constant connectivity offered by smartphones and social media. We're talking about how parents, schools and young people themselves think about the technology in their lives and how they use it so that the benefits outweigh the risks.

What details would you include in your obituary? A Brattleboro-area hospice is using the question to encourage thinking about living and aging well.
Matthew Smith / VPR

What do you want your obituary to say? What details beyond birth, death and the basics are essential to the story of your life? The Brattleboro Area Hospice is holding a workshop encouraging people to think about their life - and to to engage people about aging well, dying well and making plans now for how to spend one's final days.

We're talking about philosophy as a discipline and a way of thinking - and its relevance to everyday life.
Jakarin2521 / iStock

Philosophy can get a bad rap as a subject only for scholars and academics, with little use in the real world. But many in the field say that philosophy doesn't have to be inaccessible; it can be a tool we use to tackle a wide range of the problems that we face every day. We're delving into this ancient subject and exploring how philosophy is relevant today.

A bill proposing new regulations on toxic substances was vetoed by Gov. Phil Scott, but lawmakers are voting again and could override the veto.
Antoine2K / iStock

A bill that could change how Vermont regulates toxic substances was vetoed by Gov. Scott. Now lawmakers are working on a possible veto override. We're looking at what the bill could mean for Vermont, the reasons behind the governor's veto and the prospect of a possible override. 

Ethan Chandra has a condition called heterotaxy, and has gone through five heart surgeries before age 4.
Courtesy / The Chandra Family

After hearing our episode about hearts, 3yo Ethan Chandra, from Middlesex, NJ, wanted to share the story of his own heart. In this podcast extra, Ethan and his 5yo sister Zoe and their mother, Ali, talk about what it's been like for Ethan to live with a condition called heterotaxy.

Vermont State trooper cars parked.
Steve Zind / VPR file

Vermont State Police are emphasizing less-lethal weapons and tactics as they review their use-of-force procedures, as well as the policies that dictate when and how officers return to the job after critical incidents. But while some new weapons, tools and administrative changes have already been adopted, the policies surrounding use of force are still being reviewed.

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