Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

In this 'But Why' episode - originally released in June 2016 - we look at how to talk to kids about violence in the news.
Allkindza / iStock

In the wake of the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history in Las Vegas on Sunday, we're re-releasing our special episode for parents. We speak with Dr. Robin Gurwitch about how to answer questions children may have about violence they hear in the news. She’s a child psychologist at the Duke University Medical Center and she has served on numerous commissions and committees about children and trauma, including the National Advisory Committee on Children and Disasters.

As we learn more details about what happened last night in Las Vegas, you may be overwhelmed by your own heartbreak, fear, and anxiety. And it’s very difficult to know how to address what’s happening—or shield—the news from your children.

Title IX is often credited with getting more girls involved in sports, but there's another, more intimate milestone in the women-in-sports story that deserves some recognition: This year, the Jogbra turns 40.

In 1977, Hinda Miller had just started working at the University of Vermont and had taken up jogging. But she found she had a problem: What to do with her breasts? "I used two bras," she says. "You know, everyone has their stories of what they did."

Mark Potok is one of the country's top experts on white supremacy, hate groups and right-wing extremism. He joins us to discuss the current climate in Vermont and across the country.
Valerie Downes, courtesy

Mark Potok joins us in our studio to discuss hate and the current political climate.

833789384 / istock

Is it OK to do something that you were told not to do and then never tell anybody? We tackle that question from 10-year-old Finn from Seattle. Also in this episode: why do people make really bad choices and want other people's lives to be harder?

Steve Wadsworth greets cows at Laggis Brothers Farm in East Hardwick with a kiss on Sept. 1. Wadsworth, a large animal vet who serves dairy farms, took "Vermont Edition" host Jane Lindholm on a tour of four farms earlier this month.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

We've left the studio in favor of a field trip on this Vermont Edition to see what goes on behind-the-scenes at four large dairy farms in Franklin and Caledonia Counties.

A recent study found that adding an apology to your rejection actually doesn't make it easier for the recipient.
draganajokmanovic / iStockphoto.com

Rejection is hard. It's not easy to accept, and for a lot of people, it's not easy to deliver a rejection. So why not mix in an apology to soften the bad news?

Well, a recent study found that actually makes it worse.

With over half of the state using septic systems, we talk with experts about how to keep yours operating properly.
BlakeDavidTaylor / iStock

We know it's not your favorite subject. But over half of the state has to deal with them. Yes, your septic system.

Turnpike Road in Norwich was damaged during flash flooding this past summer. VPR's Howard Weiss-Tisman spoke to "Vermont Edition" about his recent stories looking at flood insurance.
Rebecca Sananes / VPR

Flooding is a serious business, and VPR's Howard Weiss-Tisman has been looking at the vital topic of flood insurance — which may not even continue to exist in its current form, with change occurring both in the climate and in Washington. He joins this Vermont Edition to talk about his reporting.

Jane Lindholm / VPR

Parents of small children will know the angst of figuring out the best way to try to get them to sleep through the night.

Last Tuesday, people across New Hampshire and Vermont held their collective breath after word spread that there was an active shooter at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon.

A hospital is different from a school or other places where, at least in theory, everyone can evacuate if necessary. So what happens at a hospital in a situation like that?

Vermont's latest assessment scores showed a drop in math at every grade level tested and at all but two in English.
Lucentius / iStock

The report card is in, and we didn't do well. In the results from the 2016-17 Smarter Balanced Assessment test, Vermont students' average scores dropped at every grade level tested (3rd through 8th and 11th) in math and all but one grade in English.

Keeping kids with allergies away from certain foods is a serious business. We're talking about how schools handle the challenge.
jjpoole / iStock

Serious — potentially deadly — food allergies are on the rise among kids. We're looking at how schools manage these situations, with limited resources and a diverse population of children to keep educated and fed. 

RAINEX, 2005

In the last couple of weeks, two big hurricanes have hit parts of the United States and Caribbean islands. In this episode we answer questions from kids who have been hearing the news and wondering: How do hurricanes form? Why do hurricanes strike Florida? Why do hurricanes have names? We speak with atmospheric scientist Shuyi Chen of the University of Washington.

The city of Barre has had the same mayor, Thom Lauzon, for more than a decade now. He's also one of the area's largest real estate developers.  

Some people have been questioning whether there's an inherent conflict of interest between his roles of businessman and civic leader.

Many questions remain about the proposed sale of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant. We're looking at all the latest developments on this "Vermont Edition."
Toby Talbot / Associated Press File

Many questions still remain about the future of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant, as the plant's potential sale undergoes various forms of review. 

Paul A. Hebert / Associated Press/Invision

It's been a long time and a lot of touring since Grace Potter and the Nocturnals got together at St. Lawrence University and were a Vermont band. But Grace is back home this week for the music festival she started in 2011 - Grand Point North.

This interview originally aired in May 2017: Scientists and engineers take spider silk very seriously. It has a combined strength and elasticity that humans manufacturing still can't match. And it's a still mystery exactly how the arachnids pull that off.

This interview originally aired in May 2017: We all know what it's like to be cranky the morning after a lousy night's sleep. But the consequences of a lot of people missing those few hours of shut-eye can be much more dire - including serious physical and mental health complications.

For teachers in some school districts around the state, these last few weeks have been not just back-to-school time but back-to-the-bargaining-table time.

In two of the state's largest communities - Burlington and South Burlington - negotiations between teachers and the school boards have hit snags. In Burlington, teachers have set a strike date for this Wednesday.

Pages