Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound. In 2016 she started the nationally recognized But Why, which takes questions from kids all over the world and finds interesting people to answer them.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service. Her hobbies include photography, nature writing and wandering the woods and fields of New England. She lives in Monkton.

Sen. Patrick Leahy, the most senior member of the Senate Judiciary committee, is expressing strong concerns about President Trump's new Supreme Court nominee, appeals court judge Brett Kavanaugh
Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press

On the practice of separating children from parents for people crossing the southern border illegally, Sen. Patrick Leahy has said, "We need to ensure that the 2,500 children already separated are promptly reunited with their families. We must be clear that mass incarceration of families is not the answer — alternatives exist that have proven to be effective, less costly and more humane." Sen. Leahy joins Vermont Edition to discuss his ideas on the topic.

The Icecube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole sits atop an array of detectors buried deep within the clear antarctic ice.
Courtesy of National Science Foundation

It's a cutting-edge telescope buried a mile under the ice at the South Pole, but in many ways, the Icecube Neutrino Observatory is hardly a telescope at all. It doesn't point up at the sky; in fact, it points down, looking through the earth. It's just one of the paradoxical parts of a new field of astronomy looking at the universe by tracking the elusive “ghost particle” known as the neutrino. 

The World Health Organization now recognizes what it calls "gaming disorder," but treatment and what qualifies under the disorder is still being defined.
vitapix / iStock

Kids can easily lose themselves in the virtual worlds of video games, but what happens when gaming goes beyond a hobby and becomes a problem? The World Health Organization now recognizes “gaming disorder,” and we're looking at the details of the diagnosis and what it means for kids in Vermont.

Tom Remp / Billings Farm & Museum

But Why heads to the farm to answer a whole herd of animal questions: How do cows make milk? Why do cows moo? Why do some animals eat grass? Why do pigs have curly tails? Why do pigs have more teats than cows? Why do eggs in the fridge not hatch? How do chicks grow in their eggs? Why do roosters crow? Why do horses have hooves? Why do horses stand up when they sleep? Why are some fences electric?
We get answers at Billings Farm and Museum in Woodstock, Vermont.

As a farmer, Kyle Doda often wakes up before sunrise to work sometimes until after the sun sets.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Anyone can roll out of bed on Saturday morning and stroll down to their local farmers market. But the farmers whose produce makes the market possible have to set their alarms for a bit earlier.

Ben Mitchell is running for the Democratic nomination for Vermont's sole U.S. House seat.
Deborahanne Mayer / courtesy of Ben Mitchell

Incumbent U.S. Congressman Peter Welch has two challengers in the Democratic primary this election season. One of them is Ben Mitchell of Westminster West. He’s a longtime educator and self-identified democratic socialist. He’s made other runs for state and national office in the past as a Liberty Union candidate. 

Lavender farms, wine routes and natural beauty abound in Quebec's Eastern Townships. What are your favorite destinations in the region?
Flickr / Wikimedia Commons

Summer is a great time to explore new destinations, even ones right in your own backyard. We're touring Québec's Eastern Townships and looking at all that's on offer right on Vermont's doorstep. 

Lawmakers gathered in the House chamber moments before the attempted override vote.  We're talking about next steps after the vote failed to override Gov. Scott's budget veto.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

A vote to override Gov. Phil Scott's budget veto has failed, sending lawmakers back to the drawing board as the clock ticks closer to a possible state government shutdown. On Vermont Edition, we're talking with reporters about how we got to this point, where the negotiations go next and what the final budget might end up looking like.

Samel Williams and grandson Walter G. McClain, who donated this photo to the Lowcountry Digital History Initiative.
The McClain Family

Samuel Williams was just a boy when he was liberated from slavery in South Carolina. He eventually made his way to Springfield, Vermont, where he raised a family and wrote a pseudonymous memoir, giving voice to his early life in slavery and the struggles of starting over. 

Fred Tuttle, left, and Jack McMullen squared off in a now-notorious debate during the 1998 Republican primary.
VPR file/Tim Johnson, VPR

Twenty years ago a political debate on VPR pitted a retired dairy farmer against a Harvard-educated Vermont newcomer in the Republican primary for the U.S. Senate. We're looking at back on the Tuttle-McMullen debate, how it affected the 1998 election and what the debate says about Vermont politics and values.

Close up of a teal dragonfly's eyes
Macroworld / iStock

They're out there, again. Bees, borers and butterflies. Dragonflies, damselflies and dobsonflies. And now Vermont Edition is ready to get up close and personal with all of them.

Ants tend to live in large, specialized colonies where every individual has a job that benefits the whole community.
Cabezonification / iStock

Why do ants bite? Do both male and female ants have stingers? Do ants sleep? What do they do in the winter? In this episode we learn all about the fascinating world of ants with Brian Fisher, curator of entomology at the California Academy of Sciences. Fisher has identified about 1000 different species of ants!

Vermont's domestic violence intervention programs see about 300 men each year in programs designed to stop intimate partner violence. The programs seek to change attitudes and behavior to end a cycle of abuse.
Benjavisa / iStock

More than one thousand people were charged with domestic violence in Vermont last year. In just the last month, the state has seen several shocking murders involving what investigators have described as long histories of domestic violence.

The plight of the victims rightfully gets most of the attention. But for every victim of abuse, there is an abuser. We're looking at what help is available to stop abusers from continuing the pattern of violence. 

The number of adults  living with their parents is increasing. We're talking about these living situations and how they can work.
Kwanchai Khammuean / iStock

You might have seen a story making the rounds about a 30-year-old forced by a court to leave his parents' house. It's an oddball example of what is an increasingly common arrangement: adult children living with their parents.

We're talking about reasons people might choose this situation, and how they make it work (or alternatively, ways it can go wrong).

State's attorneys in Windsor and Chittenden County are working with Vermont Law School's Center For Justice Reform on efforts to expunge misdemeanor marijuana offenses from the criminal records of Vermonters.
MmeEmil / iStock

On July 1 Vermont's marijuana laws will allow adults 21 and older to possess and cultivate small quantities of the drug for personal use. But possession under two ounces has been a misdemeanor offense in Vermont, which means thousands of Vermonters will have criminal records for offenses that will soon be considered legal in the state. Now Vermont Law School is working with states attorneys in two counties to facilitate expunging those offenses from Vermonters' criminal records.

Granite, seen here at the Rock of Ages quarry in Barre, is one of Vermont's three state rocks, along with marble and slate.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

Vermont has three state rocks — and with good reason. Granite, marble and slate have done a lot to shape the state economically, environmentally and demographically. On this Vermont Edition, we dig into how and why that happened.

Vermont lawmakers are creating a way to import cheaper prescription drugs from Canada. But how will the system ultimately work?
eyegelb / iStock

Vermont is embarking on an ambitious experiment to bring down the high cost of prescription drugs by importing cheaper medications from Canada. State lawmakers and the governor passed the proposal into law in mid-May, but the details - and federal approval - still need to be worked out. How will the plan actually work?

Northern cardinals have distinctive colors and call to one another at dawn and dusk.
Tyler Pockette / courtesy

How fast can the fastest bird go (and what bird is it?) Why do birds have wings? How do they fly? Why are birds so colorful? And why do they sing at dawn and dusk? In the second part of our live show in April with Bird Diva Bridget Butler, we learn all about birds, and get some lessons in how to sing like our avian neighbors!

Gov. Phil Scott called a special session, which started this week, after vowing to veto the state budget passed by lawmakers.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

The acrimony in Montpelier has been clear for weeks as Gov. Phil Scott stuck to his promise not to sign the budget passed by lawmakers. Now elected officials are back in Montpelier for a special session to resolve the budget impasse, but with familiar arguments on both sides of the divide, are they any closer to an agreement?

"Vermont Edition" hears from agencies that prepare individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder for a career.
wildpixel / iStock

According to the CDC, about one child in 60 is identified with Autism Spectrum Disorder or ASD. We'll discuss the unique challenges individuals with ASD face as they enter the workforce after graduating from high school and college.

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