Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

Scientists say storms like this one in Waitsfield in 2010 are dumping more rain on the Northeast
Toby Talbot / AP

The draft National Climate Report both refines and underscores the impact of human activity on our climate. We're focusing in on the effects in Vermont and the Northeast.

Betty Smith Mastaler, seen here in 1978, talked to "Vermont Edition" recently about her first years at VPR and the state of the station.
VPR file

Aug. 13, 2017 marked Vermont Edition's 10th anniversary, and the 40th anniversary of Vermont Public Radio. To mark the occasion, we talked to someone who has been with the station for more than 40 years and has done a little bit of everything: Betty Smith Mastaler.

Nicholas Erwin / flickr

Next week, people across the country will turn their eyes - hopefully safely protected - to the skies to watch a rare solar eclipse. We're looking up too. We'll talk about the eclipse, and about stargazing, astronomy, and all the latest from space - including the dramatic final mission of the Saturn probe Cassini. 

Brittany Caine-Conley, Congregate Charlottesville's lead organizer, speaks to those gathered at a vigil on Sunday, Aug. 13 at the site where the day before a car crashed into people protesting a white nationalist rally in the city.
Steve Helber / Associated Press

White supremacy, violence and even death played out in the streets of Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend. On this Vermont Edition, we'll discuss how we talk about these recent events and also look at what we can do here to address the issues raised.

VPR's Gunshots project explores the role of guns in life - and death - in Vermont through commentary, data and in depth reporting. We'll discuss the data and hear from you.
Taylor Dobbs, Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

This week, VPR has been presenting a project called Gunshots — our team compiled and analyzed data from every recorded gun death in the state over six years. VPR's Taylor Dobbs joins us to discuss the project, and the data.

When you're the economist for the Vermont legislature, sometimes you have to deliver unwelcome news to lawmakers.

VPR/Melody Bodette

Middlebury's Porter Medical Center hit a low point in 2016. In the process of instituting cuts to deal with serious financial losses, staff morale suffered. 

Interview originally aired in March 2016The Chittenden Solid Waste District initiated a public art project — "The Art Of Recycling" — in collaboration with and funded by Dealer.com. Eight of the district's big receptacles were turned over to local artists to beautify. And they're pretty striking.

Vermont Edition's Jane Lindholm met with CSWD's marketing specialist Jonny Finity and local artist Mary Lacy to see a few of these containers and talk about the project.

Interview originally aired in April 2016Joseph Mazur is professor emeritus of mathematics at Marlboro College and author of Fluke: The Math & Myth of Coincidence. Mazur spoke to Vermont Edition about his book and the odds related to coincidences occurring, as well as the distinctions between coincidences, flukes and serendipity.

In this file photo, Judith Jones accepts a lifetime achievement award at the James Beard Foundation Awards ceremony on May 8, 2006 in New York. Jones, who edited cookbooks and more throughout her career, died at her summer home in Walden on Aug. 2, 2017.
Richard Drew / Associated Press File

When editor and author Judith Jones died last week at her summer home in Walden, Vermont, she was remembered as someone who forever changed our attitudes toward cooking and food. Jones was working for Alfred A. Knopf publishing when she discovered Julia Child, whose groundbreaking book on French cooking had been rejected by other publishers.

In this 2013 photo, an employee of Brown & Brown Insurances uses a treadmill desk
Michael Conroy / AP

The sedentary hours we spend at work at a desk or in front of a computer take a toll on our health. With nearly two-thirds of Vermont adults overweight or obese, businesses are discovering the benefits of giving employees more opportunities to be active and eat better. 

A researcher at St. Michael's College in Colchester has been awarded more than $365,865 by the National Institutes of Health to conduct research into young people and e-cigarettes.

Qvasimodo / istock

In this episode, we're answering some of our frequently asked questions, the questions we hear a lot from all of you: why are there so many different languages? Why do we get hiccups? Why do our fingers get wrinkly in the tub? Why are plants so many colors? Why do leaves change colors in the fall? Why is the sky blue?

The pirate ship Aladdin sailed on Lake Champlain from 1929 to 1939. Boys at South Hero's Adventurers Camp used the ship as a mobile classroom.
Baker Family Collection, Courtesy

During the Great Depression a pirate ship and its crew sailed around Lake Champlain, hoisting the Jolly Roger while anchored just off the shore of Plattsburgh and even making its way up the river to Montreal.

Even public radio hosts keep bees! We're talking about the ins and outs of beekeeping.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

After Sherlock Holmes retired from detective work, he became a beekeeper, so you know it's got to be a pretty cool hobby. We're talking about the ins and outs of backyard beekeeping.

The Cowmobile is one of the endearing images of Ben & Jerry's. We discuss how important the social mission is to the company today.
Jonathansloane / iStock

Ben & Jerry's has always been a company that stands for something, a company that has a heart. But 17 years after it was sold to global food conglomerate Unilever, we check in to see if the company's social mission is still in place.

Frequent bouts of rain and cooler weather than normal this summer have been annoying for recreation, but seriously problematic for Vermont farmers.

As more and more people rely on cell phones to stay connected, landline services, especially in rural areas, are becoming a challenge for providers. But those same customers are often the ones unable to rely on cell phones.
smiltena / iStock

Live call-in discussion: For some Vermonters, landlines remain a lifeline, a crucial service without many viable alternatives. But as more and more people switch to cellphones, providers are struggling to ensure the future of the traditional landline.

A new study shows that even a small amount of development around a lake can put the body of water at risk of salinization.
Wilson Ring / Associated Press

Here in the north country, we spread a lot of salt on our roadways to melt the ice that causes hazardous winter driving conditions. But that salt has to go somewhere.  Flora Krivak-Tetley, a PhD student in Biology at Dartmouth College, is part of a group of researchers with the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network that has been taking a look at how salt is affecting waterbodies from Maine to the Midwest.

An archaeological dig at Jamaica State Park in 2010 found ample evidence that the site was a seasonal fishing camp at least 7,000 years ago.
VPR FILE

When we discuss archaeology in Vermont, it's not about dinosaurs or the homesteads of noted figures who lived here. Instead, we focus on the things that the everyday people who preceded us  left behind as clues about their daily existence.

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