Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service. Her hobbies include photography, nature writing and wandering the woods and fields of New England. She lives in Monkton.

There was no agreement on how public special education money would be used by an independent school once  a student with a disability is admitted.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press

High school and middle school education was once confined to teaching the Three Rs.

But increasingly schools are being called on to help students with social and personal problems ranging from the negative effects of social media to trauma in their home lives; problems that can lead to disruptive behavior.

Katherine Welles / iStock

Who gets to call themselves "Vermonters"? We're having a conversation about newcomers, old-timers, and those who have been in Vermont for generations.

Glasses, a book and a mug sit on a wood table in front of a couch with pillows.
wernerimages / iStockphoto.com

One of life's joys is losing yourself in the pages of a good read. As it gets colder outside, we're talking about books to cozy up with — and we want to hear what titles you suggest your fellow listeners check out.

pixel_dreams / istock

What's the biggest number? Who was the first mathematician? Why is seven a lucky number? Why is fifth grade math so hard? We're tackling something new: questions about math! With us to offer some answers and some mind-blowing concepts is author Joseph Mazur.

Sen. Bernie Sanders - pictured here on Capitol Hill on Oct. 17 with Sen. Debbie Stabenow, Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Shumer - joins "Vermont Edition" to discuss key issues, including the proposed GOP tax plan.
Andrew Harnik / Associated Press

Completing a week when Vermont Edition has heard from all of the state's congressional delegation, Sen. Bernie Sanders joins us on the program.

Vermont Adjutant General Steven Cray, pictured here at Camp Johnson in Colchester back in 2013, joins this "Vermont Edition" to discuss key issues facing the Vermont National Guard.
KIRK CARAPEZZA / VPR FILE

The recent mass shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas, brought into question how the military handles the reporting of domestic violence.

Ski lift in Killington, Vermont in November 2016.
Mike Groll / Associated Press

A couple Vermont ski resorts are up and running, but instead of hitting the slopes, we're going to chat about some of the industry changes and challenges here in the state.

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., on Capitol Hill in April 2017.
Alex Brandon / AP

Taxes, gun control, judicial appointments and federal spending: The final weeks of 2017 will bring a full slate before Congress, with many decisions likely to come down to close votes in the Senate.

Cameron Russell and Noah McCarter bike through the mountains of Peru.
Eli Bennett / Mundo Pequeño, courtsey

Three cyclists will reach Vermont this week, ending a 12,000-mile ride that began in Ushuaia, Argentina almost a year ago.

Brattleboro is one of Vermont's designated downtowns, a program that develops and implements a comprehensive revitalization strategy.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Vermont's villages are facing serious challenges from big box stores, online retailers and rising rent bills. Vermont Edition looks at how downtown businesses around the state are changing to meet those demands.

CatLane / istock

Why do we have daylight saving time? And why are days longer in summer and shorter in winter?

Daylight saving time is really just a trick. At least, so says Michael Downing, author of Spring Forward: The Annual Madness of Daylight Saving Time. He's our guest in this episode and he explains the reasons behind this semi-annual ritual of moving the clocks forward and back.

piles of cardboard box recycling
danielvfung / iStock

Recyclable materials are one of the US's major exports. And a lot of our "stuff" goes to China. Recent policy changes coming out of Beijing are aimed at restricting what material comes from the United States. That's having a major effect on the US waste system.

Sarah Reeves, general manager at the Chittenden Solid Waste District, tells Vermont Edition how these Chinese policy changes are going to be felt in Vermont and why it's important to be vigilant about following recycling guidelines.

New Hampshire Senator Jeanne Shaheen, shown speaking on Capitol Hill in Washington, joins "Vermont Edition" to discuss key issues facing the Senate.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / Associated Press

New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen discusses some of the top issues facing the Senate, including health care, North Korea, the Republican tax plan and protecting domestic violence victims.

Headshot of composer and arranger Robert De Cormier
File / VPR

Robert De Cormier has been revered for his work as a composer, musician and prolific arranger of choral music. He passed away Tuesday at the age of 95.

A daytime rendering of the new Champlain bridge that is currently under construction. "Montreal Gazette" reporter Jason Magder spoke to "Vermont Edition" to update on the bridge's progress.
Infrastructure Canada, Courtesy

A massive new bridge is rising over the St. Lawrence River this side of Montreal. Construction on the new Champlain Bridge began almost two years ago, and when finished, the bridge will accommodate six lanes of traffic, a commuter rail system and a bike path.

But whether the bridge will be finished by a December 2018 deadline is the subject of some concern by both the builders and government officials.

Creative Commons / Pexels

powerful wind storm raked Vermont a week ago, reminding many just how vulnerable the state's electric grid can be to severe weather. As climate change models forecast more unpredictable weather in the future, are Vermont utilities ready for the challenges of climate change?

Hemp plants at Green Mountain CBD's farm in Hardwick, taken earlier this year.
Jon Kalish / For VPR

Growing hemp became legal in Vermont in 2013 and today more than 90 people are registered to grow it here. Vermont Edition looks at the differences between hemp, CBD (Cannabidiol) and marijuana, and where these industries and products are in Vermont today.

Baker and author Martin Philip, head baker at King Arthur Flour in Norwich, has written a book that's part memoir and part cook book. It shares what he calls 75 recipes of "a baker's journey home."
Julia Reed / Harper Wave, an imprint of HarperCollins

Before he became head baker at King Arthur Flour in Norwich, Martin Philip trained as an opera singer and worked for an investment bank in New York City. Now the baker and author is sharing his expertise and answering questions for aspiring bakers.

NPR continues to face scrutiny over its handling of allegations against news chief Mike Oreskes. Speaking today on Vermont Edition, All Things Considered host Robert Siegel said he was aware of rumors about Oreskes' behavior at NPR.

Robert Siegel spent more than 40 years working in radio news, and has reported from across the country and around the globe. Senior host of NPR's All Things Considered since 1987, he'll be stepping away from the mic in January 2018.
Stephen Voss / NPR

Robert Siegel, senior host of NPR's All Things Considered, is speaking to the Vermont Humanities Council this week, reflecting on more than four decades working in radio newsrooms. It's an apt time for reflection for the seasoned host, as he prepares to step away from the mic and retire in January 2018.

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