Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound. In 2016 she started the nationally recognized But Why, which takes questions from kids all over the world and finds interesting people to answer them.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service. Her hobbies include photography, nature writing and wandering the woods and fields of New England. She lives in Monkton.

Dreams are endlessly fascinating. Psychiatrist David Kahn describes dreams as the way your brain thinks while you're asleep.
maroznc / iStock

Why do people dream? Why do people have nightmares? How do dreams happen? Can people who are blind can see in their dreams?

In this episode of But Why, we're answering dreamy questions with psychiatrist Dr. David Khan of Harvard Medical School.

As of Jan. 1, 2018, all Vermont employers are required by law to provide paid sick time to employees working 18 hours a week or more.
Kelly Sikkema / Unsplash

For more than a year, Vermont has required employers to provide paid sick time to employees working at least 18 hours per week. Even businesses that already offered paid sick leave often required policy changes to comply. We're looking at Vermont's paid sick time law one year in.

The #MeToo movement has shined a light on how men need to change to end the abuse and harassment of women.
Ronniechua / iStock

According to metoomvmt.org, nearly 18 million women have reported a sexual assault since 1998.

The #MeToo movement is successfully raising awareness, but moving forward, how do we cultivate healthier attitudes in men—and boys—to end these unwanted actions?

The stolen black rhinoceros horn has been returned intact to UVM.
Brian Jenkins / University of Vermont, courtesy

In April 2017, the University of Vermont discovered a black rhinoceros horn was stolen from Torey Hall.

Potentially worth hundreds of thousands of dollars on the black market, the horn has now — almost a year later — been found. But not in Vermont.

"The Vermonter" travels from its northernmost stop in St. Albans through New England to Washington, D.C.
Vermont Agency of Transportation

Amtrak president and CEO Richard Anderson startled rail passengers and others who regularly use trains in Vermont when he said he "doubts" Amtrak would run trains on track that doesn't have a safety protocol known as PTC, or positive train control. Vermont is among the states that doesn't have PTC on its tracks.

Comic book legend Stan Lee and actor Chadwick Boseman pose together at the LA premiere of "Black Panther."
Chris Pizzello / Invision/AP

With Black Panther roaring at the box office to become one of the top-grossing movies of all time, some hope it's the dawn of a new era of black representation in film. We're talking to Dartmouth professor Monica White Ndounou. She studies film and media and offers a cautionary take to the film's success, suggesting ways the structure and ideology of Hollywood need to change first.

The exhibit at the Champlain College Art Gallery showcases "artifacts" of the imaginary town of Ralston, Vt., like this faded postcard bearing the town's seal. The exhibit runs through March 29, 2018.
Peter Moore / Champlain College

The history of Ralston, Vermont is well-known to many: the story of feuding brothers at odds over logging and textile fortunes, a dispute that ultimately led to the digging of the Thibodeau Canal which now separates the island from Burlington. Only, there is no canal and that history isn't real. But it's all part of "Quality of Life: The Ralston Historical Museum" exhibit now at the Champlain College Art Gallery.

An F-35B lifts off from the runway at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida in October 2017. Burlington will receive 18 F-35s starting in 2019.
Samuel King Jr. / U.S. Air Force

Eighteen F-35 stealth fighter jets are set to come to Vermont next year, but on Town Meeting Day, a ballot question with language rejecting the fighters passed with wide support in Burlington. We're looking at what that vote means and what happens next for the F-35s in Vermont.

About 100 people filled Tracy Hall in Norwich for an informational town meeting on Monday night.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

An overwhelming majority of school budgets passed on Town Meeting Day, but the Scott administration says those budgets need be cut back further and placed in the hands of state policymakers.

The job school superintendents love to hate is deciding on whether to close school or not in the winter.
Willowpix / iStock

There are two sides to school snow days. You've got the kids who get a day off and a chance to romp in the snow and catchup on the homework they might not have gotten done on time. And then there's the parents who might have to take a day off of work to watch the kids. But beyond that are the school superintendents who have to make the decision to close school.

Calais voters respond to a meeting to increase funding for battered women's shelter. We're talking about some of the results out of Town Meeting Day.
John Dillon / VPR

Before the glow fully fades, we're checking in with two reporters from VPR's team to talk about some of the results out of Town Meeting Day.

UVM students recently gathered in the Waterman Building to call on the school to address racial justice, inequity and diversity on campus.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR FILE

UVM students blocked a main thoroughfare to highlight their demands for greater inclusion and diversity. High school students in Montpelier and Burlington organized to raise the Black Lives Matter flag at their schools. And next week, high school students across the state plan to walk out of class to push for gun legislation.

In Vermont, student activism is alive and well in 2018!

Vermont's gubernatorial race is beginning to take shape.
Angela Evancie / VPR

There's a big election on the horizon in Vermont. Parties will choose their candidates for Governor in an August primary, with the general election in November. It's still early, but the race is starting to take shape.

Emerald ash borers have been confirmed for the first time in the state of Vermont.
U.S. Department of Agriculture

A long-expected, but still dreaded, moment has arrived. The emerald ash borer, a tree-killing insect that has decimated forests in other parts of the country, has finally been officially confirmed in Vermont. We’re talking to experts about what comes next and what can be done to mitigate the damage from these invasive pests.

Alex Jospe was on the U.S. National ski orienteering team from 2007 to 2015, and she set the course for this week's ski orienteering world cup in Craftsbury.
Alex Jospe / courtesy

World class athletes from teams around the world are gathering in Craftsbury, Vermont for the final event in the Ski Orienteering World Cup this week. Never heard of SkiO? You're not alone.

The Jericho town meeting in 2017. We're talking about whether town meeting still make sense in the modern era.
Kathleen Masterson / VPR

Town Meeting Day is almost here, and every year the question gets raised: does town meeting still make sense in the modern era? We're looking at how this tradition has changed over time and how it fits with Vermont's democracy today.

Getting enough sleep is really important for the development of your brain, muscles, and emotional health.
Victor Brave / iStock

Why do people need to sleep? How do we actually go to sleep? How does sleeping get rid of toxins in the brain? And how come when it's nighttime I don't want to go to sleep but when it's morning I don't want to wake up?! Those questions and more, all about sleep. We're joined by pediatric sleep psychologist Dr. Lisa Meltzer.

Vermont's attendant services program, or ASP, is up for elimination in Governor Scott's budget.
Katarzyna Bialasiewicz / iStock

Vermont's attendant services program — or ASP — directs $1.38 million in state funds to help Vermonters with permanent and severe disabilities. It’s been targeted for elimination by Gov. Scott’s latest budget.

We're talking with Vermont gun owners about how their use of firearms informs their views on gun laws and gun control.
artas / iStock

Conversations about firearms and gun control are often dominated by extreme views, leaving many in the middle whose voices aren't heard. That includes voices informed by their own gun ownership. We're talking with Vermont gun owners about recent shifts in the discussion around guns and our gun laws. 

Mo, a recurring character from Bechdel's comic strip Dykes to Watch Out For, is drawn in black and white with an exasperated facial expression on the wall of Bechdel's exhibtion at the Fleming Museum
Meg Malone / VPR

Vermont has laid claim to cartoonist Alison Bechdel, making her its third (and current) cartoonist laureate. And now fans of Bechdel and those who are Bechdel-curious can see an exhibition of her work at UVM's Fleming Museum through May 20.

Pages