Jane Lindholm

Host, Vermont Edition & But Why

Jane Lindholm hosts the award-winning Vermont Public Radio program Vermont Edition. She is also the host and creator of But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

Jane joined VPR in 2007 to expand Vermont Edition from a weekly pilot into the flagship daily newsmagazine it is today. She has been recognized with regional and national awards for interviewing and use of sound.

Before returning to her native Vermont, Jane served as director/producer for the national program Marketplace, based in Los Angeles. Jane began her journalism career in 2001, when she joined National Public Radio (NPR) as an Editorial/Production Assistant for Radio Expeditions, a co-production of NPR and the National Geographic Society. During her time at NPR, she also worked with NPR's Talk of the Nation and Weekend Edition Saturday.

Jane graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in Anthropology and has worked as writer and editor for Let’s Go Travel Guides. In her free time, Jane enjoys nature writing and photography. She has had her photojournalism picked up by the BBC World Service and combines photography and nature writing on her blog, CommonWanderer.com. She lives in Monkton.

Emily Herr, who created this mural in Richmond, Virginia, is headed to Burlington to paint a wall as part of her Girls Girls Girls Mural Tour.
Emily Herr / HerrSuite

Emily Herr receives commissions to paint murals in her hometown of Richmond, Virginia. But it was one of her personal pieces, highlighting everyday women, that spawned a painting tour that will bring her to Burlington next week.

Herr shared her thoughts about what she calls the "Girls Girls Girls" Mural Tour with Vermont Edition.

Researchers aren't entirely sure, but the current prevailing theory is that flamingos stand on one leg to conserve energy.
Paul Rose / Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust

We’re answering ten questions as quickly as we can in this episode of But Why. Why do onions make you cry? How do hummingbirds hum? Why do flamingos stand on one leg? Do moths have veins in their wings? Do cats that share a home have the same meow? What was the first book? How do libraries get money if people borrow books for free? Why do people have fidget spinners? Why can't my stuffed animal get wet? And how do pigs poop? Can we do it all in 20 minutes?!

John Locher / AP

Even after bowing out of the presidential race last year, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has continued to crisscross the country, marshaling his support for progressive causes and candidates. But as his popularity remains strong, Sanders is also answering allegations related to his wife's tenure as president of now-defunct Burlington College.

The Federal Communications Commission has proposed rolling back net neutrality regulations. On this "Vermont Edition," we look at what the changes are and how they could affect internet users.
Kynny / iStock

Net neutrality is the concept that all data on the internet is treated equally. The Federal Communications Commission instituted these regulations during the Obama administration.

Now, those rules could be rolled back to allow internet providers to offer "fast lanes" for those willing to pay for that access.

Vermont will study how so-called 'rape kits' are processed into evidence, as part of a new law that Gov. Phil Scott signed on Tuesday, July 17, 2017.
Rick Bowmer / AP

The governor signed two bills on Tuesday that extend protections for victims of sexual assault and domestic violence. Some of the changes have been long in coming for the advocates who work on these issues.

Dr. James Hudziak, a professor at UVM's Larner College of Medicine, developed an app to help coach college students on healthy behaviors. Hudziak has now received a $1.8 million grant to study the app's effectiveness.
PeopleImages / iStock

A University of Vermont program designed to help college students form healthy behaviors could go national with the help of nearly $2 million in grant money. 

Worshippers at the Islamic Society of Vermont in Colchester.
Oliver Parini

Earlier in July, Imam Islam Hassan assumed his new position as the imam of the Islamic Center of Cleveland. That's only of interest to us here because Hassan leaves behind the Islamic Society of Vermont in Colchester, where he was the first imam for a growing Vermont Islamic community.

The Guildhall Public Library dates from 1901. We're talking about how libraries fund the services they provide to Vermonters.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Among many other records, Vermont can boast more public libraries per person than any other state in the union. How those libraries get their funding is far from uniform; it can vary greatly from town to town. We're talking about how libraries get the money they use, how they deal with funding challenges, and how it all affects the services they offer to Vermonters.

It is estimated that 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's disease, the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States. On this "Vermont Edition," we discuss challenges faced by those who provide care for their loved ones with memory loss.
wildpixel / iStockphoto.com

For individuals with dementia, in most cases there is at least one caregiver who is helping them navigate life with memory loss. We look at the challenges these caregivers face while watching their loved one struggle with this condition.

Wildlife biologist David Sausville of Vermont Fish and Wildlife holds a Canada goose before it gets inspected and banded. Every summer the Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife asks the public to help round up resident Canada geese.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

Have you ever caught a wild goose? Well, every year Vermont Fish and Wildlife invites the public to do just that, helping them corral wild Canada geese in order to record and band the birds.

Governor Phil Scott has said that Vermont can turn the tide on the state's opioid abuse problem through enhanced treatment, better prevention and stricter enforcement.
BackyardProduction / iStock

The country's "drug czar" Richard Baum visited Vermont this week, just a few days after Brattleboro reported a dozen opioid overdoses. As the state's problem with drug addiction continues, we get an update on the efforts to battle opioid abuse.

Voters make their choice in Montpelier in this file photo. We're talking about what information the state collects on voters, and how that information is managed.
Toby Talbot / AP

The Trump administration's Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity has requested that states hand over detailed personal information on voters.  Vermont Edition talks to Secretary of State Jim Condos about how he plans to respond to the controversial request.

A new poetry collection titled "Roads Taken: Contemporary Vermont Poetry" was co-edited by current Vermont Poet Laureate Chard deNiord and former Vermont Poet Laureate Sydney Lea. Chard deNiord spoke to "Vermont Edition" about the new book.
Green Writers Press, courtesy

Well before he became Vermont Poet Laureate, Chard deNiord thought there was a need for an anthology of modern Vermont poetry. Vermont is chock-full of poets, he thought, and it would be great to have a collection that would give people an idea of what's out there.

Turnpike Road in Norwich was damaged during flash flooding this past summer. VPR's Howard Weiss-Tisman spoke to "Vermont Edition" about his recent stories looking at flood insurance.
Rebecca Sananes / VPR

The rain keeps coming and flash floods have caused a lot of infrastructure damage around Vermont, so much so that the state is applying for federal aid. Vermont Edition explains the extent of the damage and how towns, the state and the federal government will sort out the repairs.

Vermont Attorney General TJ Donovan, pictured here in Montpelier in January, has joined a lawsuit aimed at preventing President Donald Trump from rescinding DACA. We're talking to him about that decision.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR file

In his six first months as Vermont attorney general, TJ Donovan has put a spotlight on the health insurance market and predatory college loans – policy issues that he says come down to consumer protection.

Helios8 / iStockphoto.com

How is bread made? Who made the first cake? Why shouldn't you touch raw eggs? On this episode of But Why, we're talking about baking. We get a lesson in bread making on a field trip to King Arthur Flour. Later, the Botanical Society of America weighs in on a recent episode where we talked about why some berries are poisonous.

Discussions around sexual consent should be ongoing between people in a relationship.
Neustockimages / iStock

As humans, we can send a lot of mixed signals. This is particularly true in relationships and thus, regarding sexual consent. We're highlighting the conversation and some of the questions caught up in it.

Travel writer Jen Rose Smith shares tips on New England road trips. She lists Portland, Maine – which is where the pictured Harbor Fish Market is located – as an outstanding food destination.
EJJohnsonPhotography / iStock

Four-day weekends don't come along often, so now that you've got one, how will you use it?

Travel writer Jen Rose Smith is the author of New England Road Trip, and she shares some ideas on Vermont Edition.

Brent McCoy / Modern Times Theater

Most Vermont cities and towns don't have a big theater district, But the good news is, that makes the whole state something of a theater district! There are performances going on from Southern Vermont to the Northeast Kingdom - and that includes some traveling performers who bring their show to you.

This label is showing up more frequently alongside bins for recycling and trash.
Toby Talbot / AP

Vermont is now three years into its plan to get the whole state on board with universal recycling and composting.  But when you look at the number inside the triangle with arrows, do you know immediately what kind of plastic it is and how to recycle it? And are you occasionally still scrapping food scraps into the garbage?

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