Kim Henry

Summer 2018 Intern, Vermont Edition

Credit courtesy

Kim Henry is a Vermont Edition intern and senior at The University of Vermont where she studies English and Critical Race and Ethnic Studies. Kim was raised in Portland, Maine, and became a Burlington transplant in 2015.

Looking down a wing of closed doors at Camp Hill prison in Pennsylvania
Marc Levy / Associated Press file

Vermont's prisons — and how the state treats its incarcerated — has been the focus of scrutiny, possible expansion, and proposed reform. We're talking with Corrections Commissioner Lisa Menard about those reforms, potentially expanding state facilities and the status of Vermonters incarcerated in other states.

The Coventry landfill is in the process of approving a 51 acre expansion.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

When you throw away a piece of garbage, where does it end up? On a compost pile? Recycled into a new object ready to use again? Or decomposing in a landfill? Vermont has many different ways of handling its waste, but with the state's only landfill at near capacity, it's worth reviewing just where our trash goes when we're done with it.

Jeff Tolbert lounges among the cast of Aunt Jack, which will be performed at the Chandler in Randolph on Saturday, July 28.
courtesy of Jeff Tolbert

Every year since 2011, the Chandler Center for the Arts in Randolph has hosted a Pride Theater Festival to highlight LGBTQ playwrights and productions. This year, the festival is staging three plays including Aunt Jack, a play about family and intergenerational tension in the LGBTQ community.

According to a 1996 sudy, students lose an average of two months worth of knowledge over summer break every year.
Baona / iStock

Anyone who's been through school remembers the glory of summer vacation -- and the blues of the following fall. Well that slow return to school is actually a documented phenomenon with a name: the "summer slide."

So far, more than 250 schools have applied for state grant money to improve their security infrastructure.
Kameleon007 / iStock

This spring, the state conducted a wide ranging survey on the security of its schools in response to an alleged attempted school shooting and allocated $4 million in grants for those schools to improve their security. Now the money is available and grant applications have been pouring in.

Wine doesn't have to be intimidating. Listen and learn more about the various varieties and how to pair it with dishes.
Ridofranz / istock

With so many varieties and pairings, choosing a wine can be pretty intimidating. That's why Vermont Edition sat down with two wine experts to demystify the world of wine.

With the Vermont black bear population up, bear sightings have doubled since last year.
Robert Cicchetti / iStock

Summer offers Vermonters a great chance to get closer to nature. But sometimes nature gets a bit too close to us. With black bear sightings in the state more than doubling since last year, Vermont Edition looks at how you can make sure your yard isn't attracting them.

As a farmer, Kyle Doda often wakes up before sunrise to work sometimes until after the sun sets.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Anyone can roll out of bed on Saturday morning and stroll down to their local farmers market. But the farmers whose produce makes the market possible have to set their alarms for a bit earlier.

Ben Mitchell is running for the Democratic nomination for Vermont's sole U.S. House seat.
Deborahanne Mayer / courtesy of Ben Mitchell

Incumbent U.S. Congressman Peter Welch has two challengers in the Democratic primary this election season. One of them is Ben Mitchell of Westminster West. He’s a longtime educator and self-identified democratic socialist. He’s made other runs for state and national office in the past as a Liberty Union candidate. 

Samel Williams and grandson Walter G. McClain, who donated this photo to the Lowcountry Digital History Initiative.
The McClain Family

Samuel Williams was just a boy when he was liberated from slavery in South Carolina. He eventually made his way to Springfield, Vermont, where he raised a family and wrote a pseudonymous memoir, giving voice to his early life in slavery and the struggles of starting over. 

David Rosane and The Zookeepers on their tour of Vermont libraries.
David Rosane, courtesy

Although libraries are often associated with tight-lipped librarians demanding quiet, a Vermont band with ties to France intends to pump up the volume with a summer library tour supporting local branches.

Hannah Weiss installing automated temperature sensors on a snow pile at Craftsbury Outdoor Center.
Paul Bierman / The University of Vermont

In the heat of summer, snow is the last thing you’d expect to find in the Vermont woods. But at the Craftsbury Outdoor Center this summer, that’s exactly what you’ll find — after a bit of digging — that is.