Liam Elder-Connors

Morning Edition Producer

Liam is VPR's News Producer for Morning Edition.

He joined VPR in 2015 as a board operator, announcer and producer before taking on the role of Morning Edition producer in September 2016. Along with Morning Edition Host Mitch Wertlieb, he works to report and produce compelling, informative and interesting newscasts and features each weekday morning.

Liam graduated from St. Michael's College in 2014 with a degree in journalism and music. Prior to joining VPR, he worked at a record store in Burlington and was the station manager at WWPV, St. Michael's radio station.

Ways to Connect

The Southern Poverty Law Center, which monitors hate groups in the country, lists one group in Burlington: The Daily Stormer, a neo-Nazi website, that encouraged users to start regional forums for planning real life meet-ups.

What can educators do to help integrate refugees into their new communities? An associate professor at the University of Vermont will lead an effort to find out, thanks to a Fulbright award to conduct research on refugee integration in western Canada.

From 2011 through 2016, the majority of gun deaths in Vermont were suicides. Public health professionals are working to reduce that number by encoraging people to safely store their firearms using gun locks and safes.
Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR Photo Illustration

An analysis of gun deaths in Vermont over a six-year period showed that 89 percent of those deaths were suicides. Public health experts say they aren't surprised by that number and are trying to find ways to reduce it.

To accommodate the rising number of people illegally crossing the border from the United States into Canada in order to seek asylum, Montreal has had to set up Olympic Stadium as a temporary shelter.

Vermont Suicide Prevention Center Director Joelle Tarallo says feelings of connection are very important in preventing suicide.
PeopleImages / iStock

According to the Vermont Department of Mental Health, the suicide rate in Vermont has increased over the past 10 years. In 2014, according to the department’s data, there were more than 17 suicides per 100,000 Vermonters. The New York Times reported that the national average that year was 13 suicides per 100,000 people.

A Vermont correctional facility with one of the highest per inmate costs in the state will be closing on October 31. The Southeast State Correctional Facility in Windsor is slated to shut its doors after Vermont lawmakers called for its closure in this year's budget bill.

The steeple on the Unitarian Universalist church at the head of Church Street in Burlington.
Historic American Buildings Survey / Library of Congress

A simple question about the history of Burlington's Church Street yielded some interesting trivia about the city, and the commercial district that now defines downtown.

Burlington-based band Swale has been together for 15 years. In July, they released their third album, "There's No One Here."
Shem Roose, Courtesy

Broadly speaking, the Burlington-based band Swale plays rock songs — though labeling their music that way is a little like filling a paint palette with just one color. 

Tom Huebner, the CEO of Rutland Regional Medical Center, says tens of thousands of Vermonters could lose coverage under the proposed Republican health care legislation. He also says his hospital could lose $19 million in federal reimbursement.
Nina Keck / VPR file

Senate Republicans plan to unveil a new version of their health care bill this week, but unless it differs substantively from the previous version, Rutland Regional Medical Center could lose $19 million a year in federal reimbursements, according to the hospital's CEO.

In the 1850s, a small but vibrant community grew up around a gold mining operation in the Plymouth-Bridgewater area. Called Plymouth Five Corners, it had a hotel, a school and a dance hall.
E.G. Davis / Plymouth Historical Society

This month on Brave Little State, we’re doing things a little differently. Instead of taking on one of your questions about Vermont, we’re taking on three — in a kind of local history lightning round.

VPR Newscast for 6/20/2017 at 12:15 p.m.

Dannyone / iStock

With frequently wet and cool weather in Vermont this spring and summer, that's meant farmers have had to play catch up when it comes to planting crops and harvesting hay.

Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

A teen who believes she can see into the mind of a serial killer, a feminist take on Death of a Salesman through poetry, and a collection of interlocking short stories set in Sweden. All three are subjects of the books nominated for this year’s Vermont Book Award.

Keurig Green Mountain is laying off up to 40 people across its Waterbury, Essex and South Burlington locations.

Over 200 years ago, the Spitfire, a Revolutionary War-era gunship, sank to the bottom of Lake Champlain after being damaged during the Battle of Valcour Island. Now, researchers are proposing a plan to raise the ship, restore it and put it on display.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR/File

A gunship that sank during battle more than two centuries ago might finally be resurfaced from the depths of Lake Champlain and put on display.

On Tuesday, Royalton will vote for a second time on whether to merge with Bethel and Rochester school districts to form the White River Unified School District.

Last week, Gov. Phil Scott announced the appointment of attorney Anthony Roisman as chairman of the Public Service Board. 

Newscast for 6/7/2017 at 1:20 p.m.

A long-running drama may be coming to a close in Coventry, where the town clerk who also serves as treasurer has been under an insurance and criminal investigation for how she's dealt with the town’s books.

Deb Markowitz is a former head of Vermont's Agency of Natural Resources, and represented Vermont at the United Nations summits on climate change in Paris and Morocco.

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