Melody Bodette

Reporter/Producer

Melody is a reporter/producer for VPR News, covering Addison and Franklin counties. She was formerly VPR's deputy news director and Morning Edition producer. She began at VPR as a part-time production assistant and was promoted to full-time in 2007. She has also served as a news and editorial assistant for The Burlington Free Press. After graduating from Skidmore College, she spent a year in France working as a high school teaching assistant. Melody grew up on a dairy farm in Addison County. She spends her free time gardening, cooking, and being outside as much as possible.

Ways to Connect

Melody Bodette / VPR

Local clergy in Middlebury have planned a Community Gathering of Love and Hope on Saturday in response to vandalism at the county's Jewish congregation, as well as other incidents across the nation.

Evan Vucci / AP

On Election Day, nearly one in three Vermont voters cast ballots for Donald J. Trump — and VPR reporters teamed up with Brave Little State to hear from a few of them.

Library of Congress

On this special episode, we’re going to listen to a story about how turkeys used to get from farms in Vermont to markets and dinner tables far away in Boston, a distance of a couple hundred miles. This was before refrigerated trucks. So how do you think they did it?

GMVozd / iStock

Why do we like to eat certain foods? Why do some people like to eat spicy food and some people don't like to eat vegetables? Why does pineapple hurt your mouth when you eat too much of it? Why do we taste things and how? Why do different foods taste different? Do animals have the same taste buds as people?

VTrans, rendering

Community members in Middlebury will be discussing a plan to replace two downtown rail bridges at a meeting Thursday with the Vermont Agency of Transportation. The state hopes to replace the bridges over a 10-week period in 2019, before Amtrak extends service north along Route 7.

Vermont's rifle season is underway, and hunters have been up before dawn trying to bag a buck. And this year, wardens are enforcing a new ban on the use of natural urine-based scent lures. 

Jessica Hyde / istock

Are ghosts real? Why do some cultures believe in fairies and gnomes and some don't? We'll learn about how beliefs in ghosts vary in different parts of the world with Justin McDaniel of University of Pennsylvania. Then we're off to Iceland to learn about magical creatures with Terry Gunnell.

Vermont's new lieutenant governor will be Progressive/Democrat David Zuckerman, and he'll serve with Republican Phil Scott, who won a resounding victory in the gubernatorial race.

Mark Scott / Vermont Fish and Wildlife

While rifle hunting season is still a week away, around 7,000 young Vermonters will be getting the chance to hunt for deer this weekend.

Jane Lindholm / VPR

How do birds fly? Why do they flock? How do they not get shocked when they sit on telephone wires? The Bird Diva has our answers to all of your questions about our feathered friends. And why do chickens lay different colored eggs? We visit the hen house at Shelburne Farms to find out.

Sean Pavone / istock

Who invented the president? Which country had the first president? We answer presidential questions historical in nature with author Kenneth C. Davis. Also in the episode: why do leaves change color in the fall?

Jane Lindholm / VPR

We're heading to the coast of Maine to learn a little bit about why the sea is salty, how mussels get their shells and how model ships get in those glass bottles.

Ohmega1982 / istock

7-year-old Kala wants to know why we say soccer in the United States, when the rest of the world calls the game "football." In this episode we hear from people who make their living in the game, professional players, coaches and commentators.

Melody Bodette / VPR

Swanton Wind has officially filed an application with regulators to build a 7-turbine wind energy project on a ridge line in Swanton. It’s been over a year since the company notified nearby towns that they planned to ask the Public Service Board for a Certificate of Public Good to build the project.

Mehgan Murphy / Smithsonian

How long does it take for baby animals to grow up? In this episode, we're learning about cheetahs and horses with two questions from siblings in Australia.

Jane Lindholm / VPR

This episode is all about bugs! We've gotten a lot of questions from you about insects and other critters. So we're tackling them with the help of Jessica Honaker and Kristie Reddick, otherwise known as the Bug Chicks.

courtesy, Michal Cervany

It's all about bikes in this episode of But Why? Why bicycles can stay up when you're riding them, but fall over when stopped. Olympian Lea Davison tells how to get started when riding, and we learn how a bike chain moves a wheel.

John Locher / AP

Democrats opened their national convention in Philadelphia by front-loading some of their highest profile speakers on the event's first night.

First Lady Michelle Obama made an impassioned speech; Massachusetts Senator and progressive darling Elizabeth Warren spoke as well. But there was no more anticipated speaker on stage Monday night than Vermont's own Bernie Sanders.

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

All eyes were on Sen. Bernie Sanders at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia Monday night, and perhaps no contingent of supporters was more engaged than the group Vermonters who traveled to Philadelphia to support their hometown senator.

Jane Lindholm / VPR

Seven-year old Sawyer wants to know: how does an engine work? We learn about chainsaws from Ashleigh Belrose, an instructor the Center for Technology in Essex, Vermont.

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