Melody Bodette

News Producer, Morning Edition

Melody is a News Producer for Morning Edition on VPR and a producer for But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

She was formerly VPR's deputy news director and a reporter covering Addison and Franklin counties. She began at VPR as a part-time production assistant and was promoted to full-time in 2007. She has also served as a news and editorial assistant for The Burlington Free Press. After graduating from Skidmore College, she spent a year in France working as a high school teaching assistant.

Melody grew up on a dairy farm in Addison County. She spends her free time gardening, cooking and being outside as much as possible.

Ways to Connect

pixel_dreams / istock

What's the biggest number? Who was the first mathematician? Why is seven a lucky number? Why is fifth grade math so hard? We're tackling something new: questions about math! With us to offer some answers and some mind-blowing concepts is author Joseph Mazur.

In statewide elections last week, voters in New York approved a measure that will create a land bank that will allow communities in the Adirondack Park and Catskill Parks to undertake some high way and utility projects. We speak with North Country Public Radio’s Adirondack Bureau Chief Brian Mann.

CatLane / istock

Why do we have daylight saving time? And why are days longer in summer and shorter in winter?

Daylight saving time is really just a trick. At least, so says Michael Downing, author of Spring Forward: The Annual Madness of Daylight Saving Time. He's our guest in this episode and he explains the reasons behind this semi-annual ritual of moving the clocks forward and back.

Dave DeVarney

A Rhode Island man will complete his goal of running through all of Vermont's 251 towns this weekend in Winooski.

UVM researchers will be studying the impacts of blue-green algae blooms on St. Albans Bay and the reactions in the community.
Sally McCay / UVM

Researchers at the University of Vermont have received a $598,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency to study the effects of cyanobacteria, otherwise known as blue-green algae. It will also take into account the human reaction to those blooms.

Melody Bodette / VPR

Work has been completed on one of the projects state officials hope will improve water quality in Lake Carmi, which has been plagued by blue-green algae, a bacteria that can release toxins.

One northern Vermont newspaper has accused another of stealing a news wire password subscription and fraudulently inflating its subscription numbers.

A Green Mountain Power truck pulls out of the Middlebury shop on Wednesday. GMP said Wednesday that for people in certain towns and cities, it could be Friday night before power comes back on.
Melody Bodette / VPR

When a storm blew through Vermont earlier this week, it knocked out power to thousands of homes and businesses in all parts of the state. Utilities say that because these outages are so scattered, it has been a slow process to bring power back to homes. It could even be into the weekend before power is restored in some areas.

Shela Linton, co-coordinator of the I Am Vermont Too project shares one of her microagressions.
courtesy, I Am Vermont Too

In a collection of provocative photographs people are seen holding white boards with messages that include: "I am not an exchange student." "You look so ethnic." "I am only into black guys." "No I'm not adopted." "You're good at sports because you're black." "Your hair is so different. Can I touch it?" All these photos include the hash tag #IAmVermontToo.

A tree downed on a powerline in Monkton, Vermont. Thousands of homes and buisnesses have been without power since wind storms hit the region on Sunday.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

More than 150,000 Vermonters were without electricity Monday after severe winds felled power lines across the state, and utility officials say it could be days before some homes and businesses have the power back on.

Kevin Smart / istock

On this special episode of But Why, we’re going to introduce you to some of our kids podcast classmates. We’ve all gotten together to create one big podcast episode that gives you a little flavor of what each one of us is all about. Enjoy!

Melody Bodette / VPR

Why do leaves change color in the fall? Why are leaves green? Why don't leaves turn all of the colors of the rainbow? In this episode of But Why, we're talking about fall leaves, and how trees go from green to fiery red, orange and yellow.

St. Michael's College students Sarah Hunzeker, Annie Ladue and Mia DelleBovi, left to right, are working on a project to convert toy cars into independent mobility devices for kids.
Melody Bodette / VPR

A 5-year-old girl from St. Albans has limited mobility due to muscular dystrophy, and during her school day that poses a big challenge. But now thanks to some professors and students at Saint Michael's College, she'll have a new way to get around: a battery-operated ride-on car.

Enno Kapitz

The enormity and horror of the Holocaust has been chronicled soberly in newsreels, in history books, in documentaries and Hollywood films. And yet one of the most revered depictions of the 20th century's greatest atrocity is communicated in a medium too often dismissed as a frivolous diversion: cartoons.

In 1992 the graphic novel Maus won the Pulitzer Prize for offering readers a simple but brilliant and relatable distillation of the Holocaust by rendering comic book versions of Nazis drawn as cats and the Jews they slaughtered as mice. A sequel told of survivors struggling to make a new life in the U.S.

The encampment on Sears Lane in Burlington was taken down by the city this week. A judge ruled Friday to block the city from taking down another encampment on Monday.
Liam Connors / VPR

This week the city of Burlington is planning to close a homeless encampment in the city's south end. We spoke to some members of the homeless community to get a sense of what they think of the decision.

Nesting pairs of bald eagles produced 35 young in 2017. Just ten years ago, there were no nesting pairs in the state.
John Buck / Vermont Fish & Wildlife

Bald eagles nested in Vermont in record numbers this year. The Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife says 21-pairs of adult bald eagles produced 35 young.

istock

This episode of But Why is a serious one. We're talking about death. Why do people die when they get too old? What happens to people when they die? What does it feel like when you're dead? Our guide is Jana DeCristofaro from the Dougy Center: The National Center for Grieving Children in Portland, Oregon, which supports children and families facing serious illness or coping with the loss of a family member.

Meg Malone / VPR

Just last week, Vermonters in many parts of the state were still looking at the green leaves of summer, with some even browning prematurely due to a long span of unseasonably hot weather. But over the weekend that changed quickly, according to Mike Snyder, Commissioner of Vermont's Department of Forest, Parks and Recreation. His department puts out the state's weekly fall foliage report.

Ryan Remiorz / AP

Four years ago, a huge fireball appeared over the small Quebec town of Lac Megantic. The fireball was from an explosion caused by a runaway train that crashed into the downtown. Nearly 50 people were killed.

That tragedy is being examined again this week in a courthouse in Sherbrooke, Quebec, where three railway employees are on trial for criminal negligence.

Sen. Christopher Bray is backing a per parcel fee on all property in Vermont to help fund water quality projects
courtesy / the Vermont Department of Health

Last week cyanobacteria, commonly known as blue-green algae, showed up in blooms that closed beaches on Lake Champlain and Lake Carmi, disappointing swimmers looking for relief from the late September swelter. But more than an inconvenience, it also posed health concerns for people and pets who might come into contact with the bacteria.

What is Vermont doing to prevent these blooms from happening? We asked Julie Moore, Vermont's Secretary of the Agency of Natural Resources.

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