Melody Bodette

News Producer, Morning Edition

Melody is a News Producer for Morning Edition on VPR and a producer for But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

She was formerly VPR's deputy news director and a reporter covering Addison and Franklin counties. She began at VPR as a part-time production assistant and was promoted to full-time in 2007. She has also served as a news and editorial assistant for The Burlington Free Press. After graduating from Skidmore College, she spent a year in France working as a high school teaching assistant.

Melody grew up on a dairy farm in Addison County. She spends her free time gardening, cooking and being outside as much as possible.

Ways to Connect

Jacquelyn Martin / AP

U.S. Senate Republicans voted along party lines (with no Democratic support) to approve a sweeping tax overhaul bill. The U.S. House has one more vote Wednesday, after which, the legislation will be ready for President Trump to sign into law by Christmas.

Purdue University professor James Saunders (right) will be speaking about his late friend and author Howard Frank Mosher on Friday in Plainfield.
Green Writers Press/Purdue University

In January, Vermont lost one of its greatest authors, Howard Frank Mosher, who died at the age of 75. Mosher was not born in Vermont, but did spend most of his working life in the Green Mountain State, writing mostly works of fiction set in the very real realm of the Northeast Kingdom.

A coalition of lawmakers unanimously passed a resolution asking store owners in Montreal to welcome customers by using only the French greeting.
swissmediavision / iStockphoto.com

Quebec's National Assembly has discovered that what's in a greeting can contain multitudes.

Pennies were first introduced in 1793, when the United States established our system of money.
Darren415

In this episode of But Why we visit a credit union to learn what money is all about and Slate Money hosts Felix Salmon, Anna Szymanski and Jordan Weissman answer questions about why money plays such a big role in modern society. How was money invented? Why can't everything be free? How do you earn money? Why don't kids go to work? How was the penny invented? Why are dimes so small?

A Massachusetts utility has withdrawn a proposal for a 60-mile long power transmission line under Lake Champlain and a converter station in the town of New Haven.

National Grid had proposed the Vermont Green Line to bring 400 megawatts of power from wind projects in New York to Vermont for use in the New England power grid. The company withdrew its request for state approval in November, citing circumstances beyond its control.

Melody Bodette / VPR

The General Consulate of Mexico in Boston will hold a mobile consulate in Middlebury on Saturday.

This satellite image care of Google Maps shows the location of Wake Robin, in Shelburne, Vt. Officials released a statement Wednesday saying they're investigating a possible Ricin exposure at the facility.
screenshot of Google Maps

Ricin, a toxic poison was found at Wake Robin, a retirement community in Shelburne, on Tuesday.

pixel_dreams / istock

What's the biggest number? Who was the first mathematician? Why is seven a lucky number? Why is fifth grade math so hard? We're tackling something new: questions about math! With us to offer some answers and some mind-blowing concepts is author Joseph Mazur.

In statewide elections last week, voters in New York approved a measure that will create a land bank that will allow communities in the Adirondack Park and Catskill Parks to undertake some high way and utility projects. We speak with North Country Public Radio’s Adirondack Bureau Chief Brian Mann.

CatLane / istock

Why do we have daylight saving time? And why are days longer in summer and shorter in winter?

Daylight saving time is really just a trick. At least, so says Michael Downing, author of Spring Forward: The Annual Madness of Daylight Saving Time. He's our guest in this episode and he explains the reasons behind this semi-annual ritual of moving the clocks forward and back.

Dave DeVarney

A Rhode Island man will complete his goal of running through all of Vermont's 251 towns this weekend in Winooski.

UVM researchers will be studying the impacts of blue-green algae blooms on St. Albans Bay and the reactions in the community.
Sally McCay / UVM

Researchers at the University of Vermont have received a $598,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency to study the effects of cyanobacteria, otherwise known as blue-green algae. It will also take into account the human reaction to those blooms.

Melody Bodette / VPR

Work has been completed on one of the projects state officials hope will improve water quality in Lake Carmi, which has been plagued by blue-green algae, a bacteria that can release toxins.

One northern Vermont newspaper has accused another of stealing a news wire password subscription and fraudulently inflating its subscription numbers.

A Green Mountain Power truck pulls out of the Middlebury shop on Wednesday. GMP said Wednesday that for people in certain towns and cities, it could be Friday night before power comes back on.
Melody Bodette / VPR

When a storm blew through Vermont earlier this week, it knocked out power to thousands of homes and businesses in all parts of the state. Utilities say that because these outages are so scattered, it has been a slow process to bring power back to homes. It could even be into the weekend before power is restored in some areas.

Shela Linton, co-coordinator of the I Am Vermont Too project shares one of her microagressions.
courtesy, I Am Vermont Too

In a collection of provocative photographs people are seen holding white boards with messages that include: "I am not an exchange student." "You look so ethnic." "I am only into black guys." "No I'm not adopted." "You're good at sports because you're black." "Your hair is so different. Can I touch it?" All these photos include the hash tag #IAmVermontToo.

A tree downed on a powerline in Monkton, Vermont. Thousands of homes and buisnesses have been without power since wind storms hit the region on Sunday.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

More than 150,000 Vermonters were without electricity Monday after severe winds felled power lines across the state, and utility officials say it could be days before some homes and businesses have the power back on.

Kevin Smart / istock

On this special episode of But Why, we’re going to introduce you to some of our kids podcast classmates. We’ve all gotten together to create one big podcast episode that gives you a little flavor of what each one of us is all about. Enjoy!

Melody Bodette / VPR

Why do leaves change color in the fall? Why are leaves green? Why don't leaves turn all of the colors of the rainbow? In this episode of But Why, we're talking about fall leaves, and how trees go from green to fiery red, orange and yellow.

St. Michael's College students Sarah Hunzeker, Annie Ladue and Mia DelleBovi, left to right, are working on a project to convert toy cars into independent mobility devices for kids.
Melody Bodette / VPR

A 5-year-old girl from St. Albans has limited mobility due to muscular dystrophy, and during her school day that poses a big challenge. But now thanks to some professors and students at Saint Michael's College, she'll have a new way to get around: a battery-operated ride-on car.

Pages