Melody Bodette

Producer, 'But Why' podcast

Melody is a Producer for But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

She was formerly VPR's deputy news director, Morning Edition producer and a reporter covering Addison and Franklin counties. She began at VPR as a part-time production assistant and was promoted to full-time in 2007. She has also served as a news and editorial assistant for The Burlington Free Press. After graduating from Skidmore College, she spent a year in France working as a high school teaching assistant.

Melody grew up on a dairy farm in Addison County. She spends her free time gardening, cooking and being outside as much as possible.

Ways to Connect

Miro Weinberger at Nectar's in Burlington on the night of Town Meeting Day 2018.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger has won a third term in office, fending off challenges from two left-leaning candidates in independents Carina Driscoll and Infinite Culcleasure.

Getting enough sleep is really important for the development of your brain, muscles, and emotional health.
Victor Brave / iStock

Why do people need to sleep? How do we actually go to sleep? How does sleeping get rid of toxins in the brain? And how come when it's nighttime I don't want to go to sleep but when it's morning I don't want to wake up?! Those questions and more, all about sleep. We're joined by pediatric sleep psychologist Dr. Lisa Meltzer.

The exterior sign of Camp Hill Prison in Pennsylvania
Marc Levy / Associated Press

The state of Vermont is looking into options for the 200 inmates its housing out of state. Those prisoners have been in Camp Hill prison — a state-run facility in Pennsylvania since last year — due to a lack of space in Vermont's prisons.

Since their move to Pennsylvania, several prisoners have died. Now, it's come to light that a Vermont corrections official witnessed a Pennsylvania guard threaten Vermont inmates.

David Moats sits in front of a microphone at VPR's Norwich studio.
Betty Smith / VPR

Earlier this week, the Rutland Herald and Barre-Montpelier Times Argus newspapers eliminated the position of editorial editor. This ends the tenure of David Moats, who has been with the Herald since 1982. In 2001, he won a Pulitzer Prize for editorials he wrote in favor of same-sex civil unions in Vermont.

United States Olympic Winter Games bobsledder Elana Meyers Taylor poses for a portrait at the 2017 Team USA Media Summit Monday, Sept. 25, 2017.
Rick Bowmer / AP

What are Olympic medals made of? Why does every country have a flag? The 2018 Winter Olympics are underway in PyeongChang, South Korea. We reached out to medal-winning Olympians Elana Meyers Taylor, Andrew Weibrecht and Hannah Kearney to reflect on what winning a medal represents. And we learn about flags with vexillologist Scot Guenter from San Jose State University.

An illustration of books on shelves.
iStock / marrishuanna

The Vermont Book Award is entering its fourth year and the prestigious honor for work of outstanding literary merit by Vermont authors has a new twist in 2018.

In the past, the nominations have been made by a committee of independent booksellers and publishers. But for the first time, this year's nominations can be submitted by the public.

LawrenceSawyer / iStock

It's been a cold winter so far, so it might be harder to conjure up images of milder winters marked by more rain than snow, but a new report released by the USDA Forest Service says those kinds of winters are very much in our future due to climate change.

And a number of very important species of trees vital to the region's health are going to be threatened as a result.

Olympian Sophie Caldwell in a photo outdoors with her grandfather John Caldwell.
Courtesy

You don't have to go far to pass the torch to the next generation of great athletes in Vermont, because in the Green Mountain State, Olympic bloodlines are all in the family.

Steven Kornreich / US Ski and Snowboard

One Vermonter heading to PyeongChang this month is an alpine skier with a name that evokes its own bit of Olympic history. Ryan Cochran-Siegle's mother Barbara Ann Cochran won gold in the 1972 Olympic slalom. Now Cochran-Siegle, 25, who grew up in Starksboro is competing in his first Olympics.

Cody Downard / US Ski and Snowboard

Five members of the USA Alpine Skiing team have ties to Vermont this year.

Jane Lindholm / VPR

But Why visits the New England Aquarium in Boston to get answers to those and other questions kids have sent us about fish.

Dairy cows eat at the Sweet Farm in Fletcher earlier this month.
Melody Bodette / VPR

Talk to any dairy farmer and ask what worries them these days and they all say the same thing: it's the low price of milk. But it's not just conventional dairy farmers who are feeling the economic pinch. Organic milk prices are also down.

Courtesy / AP

Ski icon and filmmaker Warren Miller died last week at the age of 93. For decades, ski fans have watched his films each fall to inspire themselves for the upcoming ski season. 

Joe Lemke / USA Hockey

While plenty of Vermonters are getting ready to watch the Olympics in South Korea next week a select few are preparing to compete in the winter games.

Sabina Hahn / Circle Round

Instead of an episode of But Why, we're going to check out an episode of one of our other favorite podcasts.

Circle Round is a storytelling show from WBUR, a public radio station in Boston. On Circle Round, they find stories from all around the world and then get really interesting people to act them out. This week we're sharing one of their episodes with you! This is one of our favorites. And it's actually about sharing. It's called 'The Lion's Whisker.'

courtesy

With the news last week that the Trump administration is ending their protective status, more than 200,000 people from El Salvador currently living in the United States are facing deportation.

Laura Braunstein / Dartmouth College

If you think completing a New York Times crossword puzzle is tough, creating one that makes its way into the paper of record, well that would be quite a four letter word meaning great accomplishment, yes, a feat.

529 plans allow people to put away money for college and the contributions grow tax free. People who use them can avoid paying taxes when the money is withdrawn for qualified college education expenses.
wutwhanfoto / iStock

With the recent passage of a federal tax bill, the college savings plans — called 529 plans — many people use to pay for their child's education are changing.

Courtney Bonnell / AP

In this episode, we answer a question from 5-year-old Wyatt in Los Angeles and learn about ancient underground cities in Turkey, the subterranean passageways of Montreal and the dug-out houses of Coober Pedy, Australia. Also in this episode: Why is it so warm underground?

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