Melody Bodette

Producer, 'But Why' podcast

Melody is a Producer for But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

She was formerly VPR's deputy news director, Morning Edition producer and a reporter covering Addison and Franklin counties. She began at VPR as a part-time production assistant and was promoted to full-time in 2007. She has also served as a news and editorial assistant for The Burlington Free Press. After graduating from Skidmore College, she spent a year in France working as a high school teaching assistant.

Melody grew up on a dairy farm in Addison County. She spends her free time gardening, cooking and being outside as much as possible.

Ways to Connect

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With the news last week that the Trump administration is ending their protective status, more than 200,000 people from El Salvador currently living in the United States are facing deportation.

Laura Braunstein / Dartmouth College

If you think completing a New York Times crossword puzzle is tough, creating one that makes its way into the paper of record, well that would be quite a four letter word meaning great accomplishment, yes, a feat.

529 plans allow people to put away money for college and the contributions grow tax free. People who use them can avoid paying taxes when the money is withdrawn for qualified college education expenses.
wutwhanfoto / iStock

With the recent passage of a federal tax bill, the college savings plans — called 529 plans — many people use to pay for their child's education are changing.

Courtney Bonnell / AP

In this episode, we answer a question from 5-year-old Wyatt in Los Angeles and learn about ancient underground cities in Turkey, the subterranean passageways of Montreal and the dug-out houses of Coober Pedy, Australia. Also in this episode: Why is it so warm underground?

Amy Noyes / VPR

Even for seasoned Vermonters, it has been cold. Temperatures at the beginning of the week were well below zero. Today is going to be cold and Saturday even colder, with dangerous wind chills expected.

Melody Bodette / VPR

Just as Vermonters are thawing out from a subzero temperatures, snow on Thursday will be followed by dangerous wind chills on Friday and Saturday.

Those temperatures are tough on the humans, but the state is also home thousands of dairy cows. How do all those cows, and their farmers stay warm? VPR visited one dairy farm to find out.

One of the crucial ingredients in the formation of a snowflake is a tiny speck of dust. Learn more about how snow forms in this episode of But Why.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

We're marking the winter solstice with an episode all about snow! Why do snowboards look like skateboards? We get an answer from Burton Snowboards. How is snow made? Why is snow white? Why are all snowflakes different? We'll hear from Jon Nelson, author of "The Story of Snow: The Science of Winter's Wonder." Also why does snow melt? And where is the deepest snow?

Melody Bodette / VPR

Animal welfare advocates say Vermont has made progress when it comes to handling cases of animal cruelty, but they say there's still a lack of clarity when deciding who's responsible for investigations, and who pays the costs associated with caring for the animals.

Jacquelyn Martin / AP

U.S. Senate Republicans voted along party lines (with no Democratic support) to approve a sweeping tax overhaul bill. The U.S. House has one more vote Wednesday, after which, the legislation will be ready for President Trump to sign into law by Christmas.

Purdue University professor James Saunders (right) will be speaking about his late friend and author Howard Frank Mosher on Friday in Plainfield.
Green Writers Press/Purdue University

In January, Vermont lost one of its greatest authors, Howard Frank Mosher, who died at the age of 75. Mosher was not born in Vermont, but did spend most of his working life in the Green Mountain State, writing mostly works of fiction set in the very real realm of the Northeast Kingdom.

A coalition of lawmakers unanimously passed a resolution asking store owners in Montreal to welcome customers by using only the French greeting.
swissmediavision / iStockphoto.com

Quebec's National Assembly has discovered that what's in a greeting can contain multitudes.

Pennies were first introduced in 1793, when the United States established our system of money.
Darren415

In this episode of But Why we visit a credit union to learn what money is all about and Slate Money hosts Felix Salmon, Anna Szymanski and Jordan Weissman answer questions about why money plays such a big role in modern society. How was money invented? Why can't everything be free? How do you earn money? Why don't kids go to work? How was the penny invented? Why are dimes so small?

A Massachusetts utility has withdrawn a proposal for a 60-mile long power transmission line under Lake Champlain and a converter station in the town of New Haven.

National Grid had proposed the Vermont Green Line to bring 400 megawatts of power from wind projects in New York to Vermont for use in the New England power grid. The company withdrew its request for state approval in November, citing circumstances beyond its control.

Melody Bodette / VPR

The General Consulate of Mexico in Boston will hold a mobile consulate in Middlebury on Saturday.

This satellite image care of Google Maps shows the location of Wake Robin, in Shelburne, Vt. Officials released a statement Wednesday saying they're investigating a possible Ricin exposure at the facility.
screenshot of Google Maps

Ricin, a toxic poison was found at Wake Robin, a retirement community in Shelburne, on Tuesday.

pixel_dreams / istock

What's the biggest number? Who was the first mathematician? Why is seven a lucky number? Why is fifth grade math so hard? We're tackling something new: questions about math! With us to offer some answers and some mind-blowing concepts is author Joseph Mazur.

In statewide elections last week, voters in New York approved a measure that will create a land bank that will allow communities in the Adirondack Park and Catskill Parks to undertake some high way and utility projects. We speak with North Country Public Radio’s Adirondack Bureau Chief Brian Mann.

CatLane / istock

Why do we have daylight saving time? And why are days longer in summer and shorter in winter?

Daylight saving time is really just a trick. At least, so says Michael Downing, author of Spring Forward: The Annual Madness of Daylight Saving Time. He's our guest in this episode and he explains the reasons behind this semi-annual ritual of moving the clocks forward and back.

Dave DeVarney

A Rhode Island man will complete his goal of running through all of Vermont's 251 towns this weekend in Winooski.

UVM researchers will be studying the impacts of blue-green algae blooms on St. Albans Bay and the reactions in the community.
Sally McCay / UVM

Researchers at the University of Vermont have received a $598,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency to study the effects of cyanobacteria, otherwise known as blue-green algae. It will also take into account the human reaction to those blooms.

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