Melody Bodette

News Producer, Morning Edition

Melody is a News Producer for Morning Edition on VPR and a producer for But Why: A Podcast For Curious Kids.

She was formerly VPR's deputy news director and a reporter covering Addison and Franklin counties. She began at VPR as a part-time production assistant and was promoted to full-time in 2007. She has also served as a news and editorial assistant for The Burlington Free Press. After graduating from Skidmore College, she spent a year in France working as a high school teaching assistant.

Melody grew up on a dairy farm in Addison County. She spends her free time gardening, cooking and being outside as much as possible.

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The Senate has rejected a plan to raise income tax rates on wealthy Vermonters to help pay for next year’s budget. A company that planned to grow food year-round using methane from the Brattleboro landfill has filed for Chapter Seven Bankruptcy. A Rutland man is due in court to face charges in a fatal hit and run crash that killed a pedestrian last month. Hardwood Union High School will remain closed for a second day after someone broke in and damaged the plumbing, causing some flooding and water damage.

VPR/Ric Cengeri

The names of the places around us often tell the unique story of Vermont’s history. All next week on Morning Edition, we’ll be taking a look at some of those names.

Our guide is “Vermont Place Names: Footprints of History,” by Esther Munroe Swift.

Let us know if you have a question about a place name below, and we’ll see if Vermont Place Names has the answer.

Vermont Place Names, Footprints of History was first published in 1977. The copyright is held by Esther Munroe Swift’s estate, which granted permission for its use. 

Harwood Union High School in Duxbury is closed because flooding has damaged several areas of the school.

Vermont State Police say staff arriving at the school Wednesday morning found that the school had been vandalized sometime overnight.

The vandals broke into the school and damaged plumbing and clogged drains, causing flooding to numerous areas of the school. The incident is under investigation, and police are seeking information about the incident.

School is closed because of the water damaged and clean-up.

Young women in Vermont are ill-equipped and not prepared for the challenges of economic independence and adulthood---and that’s what they say about themselves.

A new report released this week by Vermont Works for Women draws on interviews with over 200 women between the ages of 15 and 25. Vermont Works for Women Executive Director Tiffany Bluemle says there are a number of things that these young women, most of limited financial means, pointed to as obstacles to success.

The Senate passed its tax bill yesterday. The legislation raises a total of $10 million using four primary sources. One of northern New England’s most unusual natural history museums will soon have a new leader. Director Charlie Browne is retiring after 34 years at the helm of the Fairbanks Museum in St. Johnsbury. He leaves behind a museum that is very different from the one he arrived at as a young intern.

Federal regulators say they’re confident the public is not in danger from the tons of radioactive spent fuel stored in an above-ground pool at the Vermont Yankee Nuclear power plant. The price of gasoline is about to go up. Yesterday, Governor Peter Shumlin signed the transportation budget, which contains the new tax. At the Statehouse today, lawmakers are spending much of their time on the House and Senate floor debating a slew of bills.

Vermont Senate budget writers have completed their version of next year’s state budget. It includes new limits on a key welfare-to-work program. Federal regulators say they’re confident the public is not in danger from the tons of radioactive spent fuel stored in an above-ground pool at the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant.The comments by Nuclear Regulatory Commission officials came after a nuclear critic told Vermont lawmakers that the fuel rods should be moved because of the potential threat.

It’s been five years since hemp was declared a legal crop in Vermont. But there’s a catch. The law takes effect only if the feds declassify the plant—which is related to marijuana—as a controlled substance.  Federal law still forbids growing hemp. But a new bill with wide support would legalize hemp in Vermont, despite the federal ban. A wood pellet plant in Clarendon has shut down temporarily following a fire that was set off by an explosion in a sawdust hopper. A standout high school basketball player in Enosburg has died following a two-vehicle collision.

A new bill would allow farmers in Vermont to grow hemp despite a federal ban on the plant. A former lawmaker is hoping to convert an abandoned inn that once catered to out-of-state skiers into an alternative prison for some of the state's female offenders.  A planning commission in St. Johnsbury has approved a power company's proposal to build a fishing pier. The Vermont Health Department is investigating an infant salmonella case after a child came in contact with a chick.

It’s been five years since hemp was declared a legal crop in Vermont. But there’s a catch. The law takes effect only if the feds declassify the plant—which is related to marijuana—as a controlled substance.  Federal law still forbids growing hemp. But a new bill with wide support would legalize hemp in Vermont, despite the federal ban. A wood pellet plant in Clarendon has shut down temporarily following a fire that was set off by an explosion in a sawdust hopper. A standout high school basketball player in Enosburg has died following a two-vehicle collision.

A handful of Vermont dairy farmers are raising concerns at the State House about a bill that would grant driver identification cards to Vermont residents who are in this country illegally. A Winooski police officer shot a man after an altercation yesterday afternoon. Isaac Sage is a 35-year old Winooski resident who’s had run-ins with the police before. The family of a Vermont State Police trooper who was killed while trying to stop a fleeing suspect in 2003 has received a $4.5 million settlement from the state and its insurance carrier.

AP/Toby Talbot

The Moretown landfill is open again, but for locals only.

The facility has been in a dispute with the Agency of Natural Resources over complaints of “fugitive odors.

Residents, and drivers on Interstate 89, have been complaining about the smell around the landfill for a long time.

Joel Banner Baird has been following the story for the Burlington Free Press.

At the Statehouse, some Vermont farmers are raising public safety and liability concerns about a bill that would grant driver identification cards to Vermont residents who are in this country illegally. It appears to be an effort to stall the legislation, which easily cleared the Senate.  Migrant workers and their advocates say some of the farmers’ arguments sound offensive and discriminatory. Entergy Vermont Yankee has sued the state again in federal court, claiming the state has delayed approval of a back-up emergency generator.

For years, House Democrats have been reluctant to consider changes to Act 68, the state’s education funding law, but projections of double digit increases in spending over the next two years have changed the debate at the Statehouse. The push to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana has hit a snag in the Vermont state Senate.  A lobbyist for an industry group supporting wind power has apologized to a Vermont Senate committee after a witness she brought in called health concerns connected with wind power "hoo-hah," nonsense and propaganda.

Organizers of Burlington’s Key Bank Vermont City Marathon are offering an opportunity for Boston Marathon runners.

Race officials are offering 150 of the remaining spaces to Boston Marathon participants who were unable to finish the race. They say the runners trained long and hard but were diverted after two bomb attacks. So now they’ll have a second chance to complete a marathon.

Rescuers will resume recovery operations Thursday morning in Barnet.

They’re looking for one person lost on the Passumpsic River when a canoe overturned Wednesday afternoon. Two other adults in the canoe were able to swim to shore. The missing person was last seen in the river, and then visual contact was lost.

Rescue personnel and the Vermont State Police searched for the person until operations has to be suspended due to darkness. They are considering the operation a recovery mission. The person’s identity is not being released until the family is notified.

Legislation that began with a proposed moratorium on wind development has been whittled down to a study of how all electric generation projects are sited.  Both sides say they’re happy with the outcome. Justice Brian L. Burgess is retiring from the Vermont Supreme Court. Dartmouth College is canceling classes after students who staged a recent protest decrying homophobia, sexual assault and racism on campus were targeted by online threats.

Legislative leaders may get an unexpected gift from Congress as they struggle to raise enough money to pay for state government. The expansion of the state sales tax to Internet purchases could raise $20 million. Officials from Vermont’s largest banks are speaking out against a Shumlin Administration proposal to hike the franchise tax paid by the state’s five largest banks. A committee of the Vermont Senate is expected to complete work this week on a revenue bill that would limit how much a homeowner could deduct for mortgage interest when filing state income taxes.

The U.S. Senate began work this morning on immigration reform with a focus on farm workers.  A bill under consideration by the Vermont House Government Operations Committee limits use of the electronic weapons, such as stun guns to situations that justify lethal force, or to prevent imminent harm. Work has begun on a project to allow the state’s wood-fired heating system to serve some buildings in downtown Montpelier.

Work has begun in Montpelier on a project to expand the heating system used by state government buildings to serve public and private buildings in the downtown.

It’s part of a $20 million project that will expand the wood-fired heating system. It will be run jointly by the city and the state.

William Fraser, Montpelier’s City Manager says the first part of the project involves disconnecting an old water line over 90 years old, and reconnecting the services to another line.

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