Mitch Wertlieb

Local Host, Morning Edition

A graduate of NYU with a Master's Degree in journalism, Mitch has more than 20 years experience in radio news. He got his start as News Director at NYU's college station, and moved on to a News Director (and part-time DJ position) for commercial radio station WMVY on Martha's Vineyard. But public radio was where Mitch wanted to be and he eventually moved on to Boston where he worked for six years in a number of different capacities at member station WBUR...as a Senior Producer, Editor, and fill-in co-host of the nationally distributed Here and Now. Mitch has been a guest host of the national NPR sports program "Only A Game". He's also worked as an editor and producer for international news coverage with Monitor Radio in Boston.

An avid Boston sports fan, Mitch has been blessed with being able to witness world championships for two of his favorite teams (and franchises he was at one time convinced would never win in his lifetime): the Boston Red Sox in 2004, 2007, and 2013, and in hockey, the Boston Bruins, who won their first Stanley Cup in 39 years in 2011.

Mitch has also been known to play a music bed or two during Morning Edition featuring his favorite band The Grateful Dead.  He lives in South Burlington with his wife Erin, daughter Gretchen, and their mixed lab Grendel. He (Mitch, not Grendel) has been host of Morning Edition on VPR since 2003.

 

Ways to Connect

VPR/Melody Bodette

At a press conference Monday in Burlington, United States Attorney Tristram Coffin gathered with law enforcement officers along drug treatment and prevention officials to send a message to people involved in the trafficking of heroin and other hard drugs in Vermont.

“If people think that they’re going to be able to come to Vermont or be in Vermont and sell heroin, and cocaine and other hard drugs, they are wrong and there will be a stiff price to pay for that,” Coffin said.

Vermont is reacting to the news of the explosions at the Boston Marathon yesterday.  Senator Patrick Leahy says he’s hopeful that Congress can pass meaningful immigration reform legislation this session. Leahy says the proposal needs to balance stronger border security measures with a plan to offer undocumented immigrants a path to citizenship. Vermont environmental groups and some northeastern Vermont land owners are hailing a ruling that the state's Act 250 land use law applies to the possible reversal of flow in the Portland-to-Montreal Pipe Line.

Let's face it, aging and death are not conversation topics people really look forward to, but Jane Brody says it's crucial to talk about the inevitable before it occurs.

Brody is the Personal Health Columnist for the New York Times. She'll be in Westminster on Tuesday, to give a talk called "The Great Beyond Can Wait, but You Can't. Helping Your Loved Ones Prepare Medically, Legally and Emotionally For the End of Life." It's part of the Speaking of Aging Series presented by Westminster Cares.

What makes a farm a farm?  That's a question the state's Environmental Court will have to sort out as it considers WhistlePig whiskey, a company that wants to make whiskey from rye that it grows itself.  Act 250 officials ruled in February that the Shoreham-based company is not a farm, and is therefore subject to state oversight. But the company is appealing that decision. Farm advocates say what happens next could affect value added farming across the state. A Vermont House committee is going to take testimony from the public about the use of stun guns.

Monday, April 8th:
5:59am:  The Reveille:  "Tall Cedars", from the album "Instrumental Songs for Study and Reflection."
6:20am:  Soren Bodker Madsen:  "Local Hero", from the album "Acoustic Guitar."
6:49am:  Beastie Boys:  "Ricky's Theme", from the album "The In Sound From Way Out."
6:58am:  Jazz Mandolin Project:  "Oh Yeah", from the album "Jungle Tango."
7:20am:  DJ Logic:  "Michelle", from the album "The Anomaly."
7:58am:  Penguin Cafe Orchestra:  "Scherzo and Trio", from the album "Union Cafe."

A natural gas pipeline in Addison County is attracting attention of property owners along the proposed route. And it's not Vermont Gas's proposal to extend its pipeline south to Middlebury.

A Montpelier-based company wants to build a bio-methane gas production facility at a farm in Salisbury and then build a pipeline to send that gas to Middlebury College.

John Flowers has that story in the Addison Independent.

Journalist Matt Taibbi has delved further than most into the debris left behind the financial meltdown on Wall Street in 2008, and he's not shy about reporting what he's seen.

Taibbi says the story of that Wall Street collapse isn't over, despite reports in recent years that the money taxpayers shelled out to save the worst offender banks has been repaid.

Matt Taibbi will be appearing with Senator Bernie Sanders for two forum discussions in Burlington Friday on this and other financial topics.

A Williston teenager is on a literal life mission: He's in Washington DC lobbying members of Congress to keep funding for heart-related research conducted by the National Institutes of Health from being cut, due to federal sequestration.

For 15-year-old Tommy Watson, the trip to the Nation's Capitol is just another step on a journey that began with his efforts to make CPR training mandatory for students in Vermont before they graduate high school. 

"It was a great step to take because it's only 30 minutes and it teaches people how to save a life," Watson said.

The Vermont Marble Museum in Proctor closed in 2012, after the private owners decided they wanted to sell the museum and its collections.

The Preservation Trust of Vermont has stepped in to try to buy the museum and its artifacts. So far, they've raised the money needed to purchase the remaining collection. And they're in a fund- raising effort to buy the museum building.

A popular recreation center in Derby closed its doors earlier this week.

The Indoor Recreation Center of Orleans County, known as IROC, shut down after along effort to save it from foreclosure. But, in the end the Community National Bank took over the facility, months after IROC stopped paying the mortgage.

The facility opened in 2005, with construction debt it was never able to pay off.

Workers at the Vermont Veterans Home say the Bennington facility needs better financial management and better staffing. The nursing home projects it will have a $3.5 million budget shortfall for 2014. The House has unanimously approved a two-year capital construction bill that solidifies a commitment to rebuild the Waterbury state office complex devastated by Tropical Storm Irene. If lawmakers have their way, wild boar will not find a home in the Vermont woods.

Gov. Shumlin wants Vermont lawmakers to support his plan to transfer $17 million from the state's Earned Income Credit program to pay for childcare, but lawmakers are resisting the plan. Furloughs affecting 500 Vermont National Guard members resulting from automatic federal spending cuts have been delayed. Bennington police are trying to find out who took more than half a ton of copper tubing from the former Mount Anthony Union Middle School. The Vermont Veterans Home has passed a state inspection and needs to pass one more to ensure it will keep receiving federal funds.

AP/Jim Cole / In this 2005 file photo, doctors and nurses talk in the hallway of the Adult Treatment Center at the Brattleboro Retreat in

Changes are underway at the Brattleboro Retreat. The psychiatric hospital will open a new Adult Intensive Unit next week. The facility is part of the state's new plan to serve mental health patients following the closure of the Vermont State Hospital by flooding from Tropical Storm Irene.

After the storm, the Retreat immediately took patients into an older unit that was quickly redesigned for safety. Now they've fully re-designed a unit in the Tyler building on the fourth floor.

From social media to blogging to the digital revolution, the world of media news is changing, and if consumers once were expected to passively consume the news they get, they're now demanding more from the people who report the news of the day.

Dan Gillmor welcomes this future. And it's the goal of his new book and project, called Mediactive.

Monday, April 1st:  
(Suggested April Fool's Day prank: Celebrate Poisson de Avril as the French do--and apparently have since the 16th Century--by surreptitiously sticking a picture of a fish on someone's back.)
5:59am:  Bill Frisell: "Egg Radio", from the album "Gone, Just Like a Train."
6:20am:  Kermit Ruffins: "If I Only Had A Brain", from the album "Happy Talk."
6:49am:  Chick Corea and Hiromi:  "Fool On the Hill", from the album "Duet: Chick & Hiromi."

Stuck In The Middle

Nov 5, 2012
Flickr/Photo Dean / Owning a home was once the hallmark of the middle class American Dream.

There's always a lot of talk about the 'middle class' during election season. But who exactly is the middle class? Do you consider yourself middle class? Can you afford to buy a house, send your kids to college, and take a vacation every year? We'll explore what the idea of middle class means in Vermont, and to you. Our guests are Elaine McCrate, professor of economics at the University of Vermont, and Marc Dixon, professor of sociology at Dartmouth College.

Courtesy Travis Peckham / Rock climbing is becoming more popular in Vermont now that established routes are better publicized.

AP/Toby Talbot / Vermont Attorney General Bill Sorrell prepares for a debate during the August 2012 primary.

Bill Sorrell has been elected to seven consecutive terms as Vermont's Attorney General. This summer he faced his toughest campaign yet in a primary battle for the Democratic nomination. Now Sorrell, Republican Jack McMullen and Progressive Ed Stanak are vying for the role as Vermont's top law enforcement officer. VPR's Mitch Wertieb talks with Sorrell about some of the high-profile controversies in the AG's office, including how police shooting and Taser deployments are reviewed and a federal lawsuit over the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant.

Pages