Nina Keck

Reporter

Nina has been reporting for VPR since 1996, primarily focusing on the Rutland area. An experienced journalist, Nina covered international and national news for seven years with the Voice of America, working in Washington, D.C., and Germany. While in Germany, she also worked as a stringer for Marketplace. Nina has been honored with two national Edward R. Murrow Awards: In 2006, she won for her investigative reporting on VPR and in 2009 she won for her use of sound. She began her career at Wisconsin Public Radio. 

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Nina Keck / VPR

More details about the Syrian families who arrived in Rutland this week, one day apart, are beginning to emerge. Rutland Mayor Christopher Louras says he met both families.

Nina Keck / VPR

A turbulent, war torn journey that’s spanned several years and thousands of miles ended Wednesday in Vermont for one Syrian refugee family. A second family is due to arrive Thursday.

Raad Adayleh / AP

Refugee families from Syria, the first of about a hundred individuals who might be resettled in Rutland in the coming year, have begun to arrive. But millions of other displaced Syrians remain behind while they await security approval to be resettled in another country.

Nina Keck / VPR

School officials in Rutland say they’re ready for the arrival of refugee families later this month. But the Rutland County Parent Child Center, which works with younger children and babies, say it's not ready — and it blames a lack of resources.

Nina Keck / VPR

Officials at Green Mountain College hope a new annual $200,000 scholarship will attract students who might not otherwise consider a private college or a career in sustainability.

Clockwise from top left: Lisa Rathke, AP; Andy Duback, AP; Nina Keck, VPR; Jacquelyn Martin, AP; Angela Evancie, VPR.

It's been quite a year. In the final days of 2016, we're reflecting on some of the biggest news stories of the year and looking toward what's next in 2017.

Nina Keck / VPR

Ninety families scattered across Clarendon, Shrewsbury, Tinmouth, West Rutland and Wallingford got an early holiday gift this week: a food basket with a turkey and all the trimmings. 

Ryan Caron King / NENC

Next month, a mix of Syrian and Iraqi refugees will begin arriving in Rutland, Vermont. They’ll be the first of 100 that will be resettled there over the next year. Though there's been loud opposition to the plan in the aging, blue-collar city of 16,000, proponents remain optimistic — and many have been volunteering long hours to ensure the plan succeeds.

Nina Keck / VPR

The Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program oversees hundreds of volunteers in Chittenden County. And now, with a new office opening in Rutland, the organization is recruiting new volunteers.

Donald Shedd, courtesy

Seventy-five years ago, Americans woke up to shocking news on the radio. The bombing of Pearl Harbor thrust America into war on two fronts – and for nearly everyone, it meant the world as they knew it would never be the same.

Nina Keck / VPR file

As Rutland prepares to welcome Syrian refugees to its community, some are continuing to voice concerns that there aren’t enough jobs for refugees in the city, or that local residents will lose work — but many local employers disagree.

MIke Groll / AP

Thousands of people were in Killington this weekend to see the fastest women skiers on the planet do something they haven’t done in almost 40 years: compete in a World Cup event in Vermont.

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Dr. Arthur Wolk, a beloved Rutland area pediatrician, died Thursday at the age of 97. Wolk took care of thousands of children in his 42-year medical career.

Nina Keck / VPR

Students at Mill River Union High School in Clarendon will perform a stage version of The Grapes of Wrath this weekend. Theater director Peter Bruno says the Steinbeck classic seems especially relevant with Americans debating refugee resettlement, class inequality and the power of the police.

AP

Skiing superstars such as Mikaela Shiffrin and Lara Gut will be in Killington Nov. 26 and 27 to compete in the first World Cup racing event in Vermont in almost 40 years.

Nina Keck / VPR file

With Donald Trump headed for the White House, there's a looming question about how his administration will affect the United States' refugee policy — and what the future holds for Rutland's plans to begin taking in Syrian refugees this year.

PEG-TV

Republicans will hold on to all three Rutland County Senate seats. Incumbents Kevin Mullin, Peg Flory and Brian Collamore say they're looking forward to returning to Montpelier. 

Nina Keck / VPR

Thanks to an innovative collaboration, three rundown houses in Rutland known for heavy drug trafficking will be renovated to create more affordable owner-occupied housing.

Nina Keck / VPR

In Rutland County, the race for state Senate has heated up. While the three incumbents are well-known Republicans, three democrats and an independent are vying to unseat them.

Melody Bodette / VPR File

This summer, Porter Medical Center's board of directors announced that the hospital may become a partner of the University of Vermont Health Network. The announcement comes after Porter's financial issues and layoffs made news back in February, though the current interim CEO says now that Porter is in the process of "rebuilding."

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