Nina Keck

Reporter

Nina has been reporting for VPR since 1996, primarily focusing on the Rutland area. An experienced journalist, Nina covered international and national news for seven years with the Voice of America, working in Washington, D.C., and Germany. While in Germany, she also worked as a stringer for Marketplace. Nina has been honored with two national Edward R. Murrow Awards: In 2006, she won for her investigative reporting on VPR and in 2009 she won for her use of sound. She began her career at Wisconsin Public Radio. 

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ShaneKato / iStock

Your brain needs fructose and glucose. But your body can really do without the high fructose corn syrup or sucrose. And all those other added sugars hiding in processed foods and sweetened drinks.

Nina Keck / VPR

The Dorset Quarry has been touted as one of the top swimming holes in the country. But the uptick in traffic, trash and noise has turned off many locals. The quarry’s owners understand that, but they want to keep the swimming hole open and safe for future generations.

wistechcolleges / Flickr

With a tricky job market and college tuition at daunting levels, career and technical education - once called vocational education - may be looking more and more appealing to today's students.

Robert F. Bukaty / AP

While the calls of loons echo across many lakes in the region, it is not guaranteed to be something that you'll always be able to hear. The loon population has rebounded somewhat recently, but the birds are still at risk from many factors.

Xurzon / iStock

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) became law in 1990. It ensured that people with disabilities had the same rights and opportunities as all Americans.

Meg Malone / VPR

Far too often when we need to make a run to the store for groceries or other goods, we hop in the car or truck. But wouldn't be great to use your bike for a chore like that? If only your bike had the capacity to hold all those bags of stuff. In Brattleboro, there's an organization working to get more people on electric-assisted "cargobikes" to fill this need.

Vermont Department of Health

What has this summer looked like so far in terms algae blooms and the health of Lake Champlain? We're getting an update on the latest on the lake: the science of algae blooms and the state of the state's clean-up plan. 

BasieB / iStock

All that planting you did once the winter ended was invigorating. You dug, hoed and sowed, putting in vegetables, herbs, flowers, shrubs, and trees.

Ric Cengeri / VPR File

The course of history is often shaped by the outcome of battles, even small ones.  That's the case with the Battle of Bennington, which was fought back in August 1777.  Phil Holland is an English teacher at Community College of Vermont and the author of the new book A Guide to the Battle of Bennington and the Bennington Monument.

Nina Keck / VPR File

The family that owns the Rutland Herald announced late last night that it's selling the Herald and the Barre-Montpelier Times Argus to a company based in Maine that owns several newspapers and news web sites there. The announcement followed speculation about the papers' future after reports of financial problems surfaced last week.

Ric Cengeri / VPR

This primary campaign always promised to be wild and wide open with the governor's and lieutenant governor's offices up from grabs. It drew three candidates in both of the Democrat's primaries for top seats and two in the Republican gubernatorial race.

John Phelan / Wikimedia Commons

As debate continues over Syrian refugees resettling in Rutland, we're taking a look at the history of immigration into Vermont. We'll look at waves of immigration into the state throughout the past centuries, and how the pre-existing population has received new Vermonters: Irish, French Canadians, Jews, and more.  And we'll talk about how immigration is tied to internal debates about our identity as a state.

Robert Ray / AP/file

"The exercise started out with the plague," says Chris Herrick, Vermont director of the Division of Emergency Management & Homeland Security, "then we had earthquakes." Herrick is describing the limit-testing scenarios that Vermont emergency responders managed during a massive 10-day drill that just concluded.

Nina Keck / VPR File

The Rutland Herald may be facing serious financial trouble. On Friday, the paper ran an article that reported bounced paychecks for some of the news staff. That same day, longtime news editor Alan Keays was fired for approving a follow up story.

Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

The Democratic National Convention has wrapped up, with Thursday's main event being the acceptance speech by nominee Hillary Clinton. VPR's Emily Alfin Johnson and Peter Hirschfeld have spent the week with the Vermont delegates in Philadelphia and they joined Vermont Edition to share their last impressions from the DNC.

Meredith Corporation

Walk out into your vegetable garden, grab your CSA share, or casually stroll around your local farmers' market and it's happening. Mother Earth has produced an eye-popping and mouth-watering bounty of sweet corn, cucumbers, tomatoes, garlic. And on and on.

Angela Evancie / VPR

How does Lyndon Johnson State College sound?  With the Vermont State College System struggling to keep up with rising costs, officials have recommended merging Johnson State and Lyndon State Colleges.

Nina Keck / VPR

Efforts to create a new refugee resettlement community in Rutland have stirred up passionate debate. While many want to welcome Syrians into the city, others fear Muslim refugees won’t assimilate, will become a threat or burden taxpayers.

For a Syrian couple who are raising their children in Rutland this debate has hit especially close to home.

Nina Keck / VPR

Voters in Rutland will not get the chance to weigh in on whether to bring in 100 Syrian refugees. A 6-4 vote by members of the Rutland City Board of Aldermen fell one short of the seven needed to put it on the ballot.

Nina Keck / VPR

Many Americans will celebrate the Fourth of July at barbecues or parades, or at band concerts or fireworks displays. But for more than 5,000 members of the Rainbow Family, who are celebrating Independence Day in Mount Tabor this year, the Fourth of July is a very different kind of holiday.

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