Nina Keck

Reporter

Nina has been reporting for VPR since 1996, primarily focusing on the Rutland area. An experienced journalist, Nina covered international and national news for seven years with the Voice of America, working in Washington, D.C., and Germany. While in Germany, she also worked as a stringer for Marketplace. Nina has been honored with two national Edward R. Murrow Awards: In 2006, she won for her investigative reporting on VPR and in 2009 she won for her use of sound. She began her career at Wisconsin Public Radio. 

Ways to Connect

Nina Keck / VPR

Vermonters honored veterans on Monday at Memorial Day commemorations and parades across the state.  In Brandon several hundred people attended services that locals say have been held in the town center for nearly 150 years.

Marching bands from Otter Valley Union High School and Neshobe Elementary School set a patriotic tone, while a local Girl Scout led the crowd in the Pledge of Allegiance. Prayers and speeches were said to honor Brandon’s fallen soldiers, and an honor guard fired off a military salute.

Nina Keck / VPR

With its historic mansions and inns, Brandon has been a favorite wedding destination for years. But local business leaders hope a new marketing effort will help lure other types of visitors as well. 

Nina Keck / VPR

Vermont's population is aging, and that demographic trend has put new pressure on Medicare spending. It's also highlighted the need to improve care for older Vermonters. A unique program that links health care and other services to affordable housing complexes in Vermont may be part of the solution.  

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For anyone near Rutland Southern Vermont Regional Airport Saturday morning, don’t worry: What may look like a disaster is just a drill.

The airport and Rutland Regional Medical Center are sponsoring a mock plane crash that will include about 150 people.  Everyone from fire fighters and emergency medical technicians to actors, law enforcement, airport and hospital personnel will be taking part.

Nina Keck / VPR

Officials in Rutland say the city will take in 100 Syrian refugees beginning in October. Rutland Mayor Christopher Louras said he’s been working closely with state and federal refugee agencies to create Vermont’s first relocation community for Syrians.

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The College Of St. Joseph in Rutland has put its new Physician Assistant Program on hold. Two dozen students who were expecting to begin graduate-level classes in June were notified this month that the program’s start is being delayed indefinitely.

Nina Keck / VPR

Despite the introduction of electronic medical records, pharmacists say they are often out of the loop when it comes to knowing if their patients' medications have been changed. Partly that’s a technology glitch. But many pharmacists complain that despite their expertise they’re not considered providers so most hospitals don’t allow them access to patients' electronic records. 

But at Beauchamp and O’Rourke, a family owned pharmacy in Rutland, managing pharmacist Marty Irons wants to change that.

Nina Keck / VPR

Nearly 60 percent of Americans are taking prescription drugs – the highest percentage ever – and more than half of those 65 and older are taking five to nine medications. With all those pills in our medicine cabinets, it's no surprise that medication mix-ups are on the rise.

Nina Keck / VPR

Back in the 1970s, New York City launched its now-iconic "I Love NY" campaign to promote tourism. Now folks in Rutland hope the stylized red heart will promote similar good feelings for their city.

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Can a bike path help you sell your house? Can making a downtown more pedestrian and bike friendly attract more business? A growing number of transportation planners, real estate agents and community developers say yes. 

Nina Keck / VPR

A former licensed nursing assistant at Rutland Regional Medical Center claims he faced ongoing racial harassment and was wrongfully fired.

Nina Keck / VPR

In Pittsford, many are calling long-time mail carrier George Clifford a hero. Last Saturday, Clifford was midway through his 60-mile rural route when he saw something lying motionless in the road.

Nina Keck / VPR

Private wells in North Bennington continue to be tested for the potentially harmful chemical PFOA, or perfluorooctanoic acid, a contaminant now believed to have originated with the closed Chemfab manufacturing plant.

But state environmental officials are also looking at other sites where the chemical may turn up, including places that regularly use fire fighting foam.

Nina Keck / VPR

Castleton University’s footprint in Rutland will grow even larger in August. That’s when the university plans to open new student housing in a historic downtown building. College and city officials say it’s the latest effort to build closer ties.

Lawrence Kaminski, a 75-year-old traffic flagger from Wallingford, was killed Friday morning while working along Route 7 just south of Middlebury. 

Nina Keck / VPR

Last year, serious problems within Rutland Mental Health brought the nonprofit close to losing its state accreditation. Corrective measures taken by the agency have restored the state’s confidence, but one of the biggest problems for the local nonprofit remains.

Nina Keck / VPR

On Town Meeting Day, Rutland City voters approved a $2.5 million bond for an outdoor swimming pool and sided with dentists when it comes to fluoride; they want Rutland to continue adding it to municipal drinking water. 

Nina Keck / VPR

In his third trip to Vermont, Ohio Gov. John Kasich spoke to a standing room only crowd at Castleton University Monday, hoping to convince Vermonters that he's the Republicans’ best choice for a moderate, experienced leader.   

Town Meeting Day voters in Rutland will weigh in on a proposed $2.5 million swimming pool. The new facility will replace a 50-meter outdoor pool that has served the city for more than 40 years. 

Nina Keck / VPR

Rutland Town was one of the first communities in Vermont to establish local standards for siting large-scale solar arrays. And now simmering debate over solar power in the community is spreading into local elections.

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