Nina Keck

Reporter

Nina has been reporting for VPR since 1996, primarily focusing on the Rutland area. An experienced journalist, Nina covered international and national news for seven years with the Voice of America, working in Washington, D.C., and Germany. While in Germany, she also worked as a stringer for Marketplace. Nina has been honored with two national Edward R. Murrow Awards: In 2006, she won for her investigative reporting on VPR and in 2009 she won for her use of sound. She began her career at Wisconsin Public Radio. 

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Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program has offices in Colchester, pictured here, and in Rutland. Director Amila Merdzanovic says the effect of President Donald Trump's cap on U.S. refugee admissions will be felt in Vermont and across the U.S.
Meg Malone / VPR

President Donald Trump has capped U.S. refugee admissions for fiscal year 2018 at 45,000 people.

Amila Merdzanovic, director of the Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program, says the effects of that reduction will be felt in Vermont and across the country.

Two people bike on the Lamoille Valley Rail Trail last year. Bike paths were one topic brought up at a recent forum held by the Vermont Outdoor Recreation Economic Collaborative in Rutland, along with other outdoor recreation activities.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR File

Outdoor recreation brings in $2.5 billion a year in consumer spending in Vermont, but many believe the state could bring in even more.

Cape Air planes on the tarmac at Boston Airport. Airline officials say they've gotten many requests from people in the northeast to carry hurricane relief items to Puerto Rico and other islands recently hit hard by hurricanes.
Nina Keck / VPR

Many think of Cape Air, which provides passenger service to Rutland and other northeastern cities, as a New England carrier. But the airline also serves Puerto Rico and The US and British Virgin Islands, areas hard hit by recent hurricanes.

An acre-and-a-half block is available in downtown Rutland, and that got us thinking: What would people in the area like to see fill the space?
Nina Keck / VPR file

It’s not often an-acre-and-a-half of contiguous downtown real estate is available all at one time. But that’s exactly what’s happened in Rutland.

An oversized metal robot greets those who enter Mac Equipment and Steel in Rutland. The sculpture was made by Jed Danyow, a local welder who says when he's not fixing large machinery, he loves to make art with what's in the yard.
Nina Keck / VPR

If you've driven passed Mac Equipment and Steel in Rutland recently, you've probably noticed the growing collection of statues out front.

Castleton University plans to layoff an undisclosed number of staff later this year, as the school grapples with a budget shortfall.
Jared C. Benedict / Wikimedia Commons

Castleton University has a new president. Karen Scolforo will take over the helm in December replacing Dave Wolk, who has led the university for 16 years. 

The long time headquarters of the 'Rutland Herald' will be put up for auction by the paper's former owners on Oct. 27, 2017.
Nina Keck / VPR

Next month, the buildings that have housed the Rutland Herald for more than 80 years will be sold at auction. 

The Weston Playhouse Theatre Company will celebrate the grand opening of their new $6.3 million performance space at Walker Farm on Saturday.
Nina Keck / VPR

A decade-long dream will finally become a reality Saturday. Officials with the Weston Playhouse Theatre Company will celebrate the grand opening of their $6.3 million second stage and community center.

Nina Keck / VPR

Despite resettlement plans to bring 100 Syrian refugees to Rutland this year, only 14 have arrived.

Nonetheless, Vermont’s Refugee Resettlement Program has applied to the US State Department to resettle 100 more Syrian and Iraqis refugees in Rutland in fiscal year 2018, which starts October 1. 

But until President Trump decides how many refugees from all parts of the world will be allowed into the United States next year, nothing is certain.

Edmund Lewis, Zuzanna Szadkowski, Susannah Millonzi and Eric Tucker, members of the acting company Bedlam, pose in Middletown Springs where they will perform this weekend. Mellonzi and Tucker include their four month old daughter Francis in the photo.
Nina Keck / VPR

The Paramount Theater is welcoming back the acclaimed New York City theater company Bedlam for two off-site shows this weekend.

Author Cindy Pierce says many of the college students she talks to say they feel lost and confused when trying to navigating the 'hookup' culture at school.
Courtesy

For college students, the first few months at school tend to be the most dangerous time for sexual assault — students are anxious, they may be drinking more and many may be struggling to navigate the sexualized "hookup culture" that can be found on many campuses.

It’s something author and sex educator Cindy Pierce says parents and students need to talk more about.

Cape Air Captain Jonathon Coste, left, supervises First Officer William Smith on a recent flight from Boston to Lebanon, New Hampshire.
Nina Keck / VPR

After officials blamed a deadly 2009 commuter plane crash in upstate New York on pilot error and inexperience, Congress responded by mandating more training for commercial pilots.

Nina Keck / VPR

Rutland Regional Medical Center says it wants to build a new $21.7 million expansion to accommodate its growing orthopedic services, physiatry department and ear, nose and throat department.

After a lengthy legal battle, the Rutland County Parent Child Center has won tax-exempt status in Rutland City.

Rutland Regional Medical Center CEO Tom Huebner speaks at the podium in June at a celebration of the completion of the hospital's emergency department expansion. Huebner recently announced he will retire in March 2018.
Nina Keck / VPR File

Rutland Regional Medical Center CEO Tom Huebner, who has led the hospital since 1997, says he will step down in March to travel and spend more time with family.

According to a 2003 study in the American Journal of Public Health, when guns are present in domestic violence situations, women are five times more likely to be killed.
Taylor Dobbs, Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

Between Jan. 1, 2011 and the end of 2016 there were 420 gun deaths in Vermont. Most were suicides but more than half of the female homicide victims were killed by their boyfriends or husbands.

Robert Congdon is vice president of the Rutland County Agricultural Society, which runs the Vermont State Fair. Congdon, 29, says his grandfather Edward Congdon, Sr., oversaw the fair for many years and it feels like the event is in his blood.
Nina Keck / VPR

The 172nd Vermont State Fair is underway in Rutland with a shorter five-day schedule. Officials say it's part of a rebuilding effort after a rocky few years.

This piece originally aired in September 2016: In Rutland, a long-running radio show hosted by the late Joseph Chrusciel helped keep Polish music and culture alive for decades. Chrusciel, better known as "Uncle Joe" to his listeners, was a Sunday morning fixture for those who grew up in the area after World War II.

VPR's Nina Keck explored the history of Chrusciel's "Polish Hour" radio show and what it meant for the Polish community in the Rutland area.

Nina Keck / VPR

Nearly 200 people gathered in Rutland Monday night to publicly condemn the racism and violence that erupted during Saturday’s white supremacists rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, that left one woman dead and many others injured.

Pat Embree of Rutland is one of more than 4,700 Vermonter seniors who receive home delivered food with Meals on Wheels.
Nina Keck / VPR

Meals on Wheels brings nutritious food to more than 15,000 Vermonters a year, most of them over age 60.

Nationally, data show the program saves lives and billions of dollars a year in health care spending. Yet increasing demand on top of funding shortfalls are forcing program administrators across Vermont to make tough choices.

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