Nina Keck

Reporter

Nina has been reporting for VPR since 1996, primarily focusing on the Rutland area. An experienced journalist, Nina covered international and national news for seven years with the Voice of America, working in Washington, D.C., and Germany. While in Germany, she also worked as a stringer for Marketplace. Nina has been honored with two national Edward R. Murrow Awards: In 2006, she won for her investigative reporting on VPR and in 2009 she won for her use of sound. She began her career at Wisconsin Public Radio. 

Ways to Connect

AP/Toby Talbot

People who are in Vermont illegally may soon be able to get a legal driver's license. Supporters say it provides a level of freedom and safety for people who are isolated on the farms where they work. Tuesday on Vermont Edition, we examining the question with Natalia Fajardo, an organizer with Migrant Justice, who explains the quality of life issues that would improve for migrant workers if they had driver's licenses.

First it was solar power. Now Green Mountain Power officials are teaming up with Rutland area businesses and community groups to harness flower power.

Think about it. What do real estate agents always tell you when you're trying to sell your house in the summer? Make sure you've got fresh flowers growing our front to boost curb appeal. 

AP/Toby Talbot

We hear a lot about bullying in schools these days- both physically and online. But what exactly constitutes bullying?

Vermont filmmaker Eugene Jarecki says he thought about making a movie about the war on drugs for more than 20 years. The House I Live In is the result of that effort - a documentary that is largely an indictment of the legal, political and social framework of the war on drugs.

The film won the grand Jury award at the Sundance Film Festival for best documentary, and it premieres on PBS stations across the country this week. Eugene Jarecki spoke with  Vermont Edition about the film. 

Fresh snow lures a lot of people to do some outdoor exploring, but sometimes that exploring can go too far. When snowmobilers or skiers wander off or get in over their heads, many call 911, putting a strain on already underfunded search-and-rescue budgets.

In Vermont, state police have had to help find 50 lost skiers in the past four weeks.

A couple hundred years ago. hard apple cider used to be the drink of choice for thirsty Americans. It was easy to make and easy to find. But as people moved into cities, and beer became more popular, cider fell out of fashion.

Now it's come roaring back. U.S. hard cider sales are up 65 percent over last year, and just about all the big beer companies sell it, as well as many artisan brewers. Finding cider at your local bar is often no longer a problem.

If the thought of eating horse meat makes you queasy, what about strong, sturdy oxen? A small Vermont college that emphasizes sustainable living will soon slaughter two beloved campus residents: Bill and Lou, a pair of oxen. Green Mountain College plans to serve the meat from the oxen in its dining hall, but the plan has drawn international outcry and a massive Facebook petition to save the oxen.

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