Nina Keck

Reporter

Nina has been reporting for VPR since 1996, primarily focusing on the Rutland area. An experienced journalist, Nina covered international and national news for seven years with the Voice of America, working in Washington, D.C., and Germany. While in Germany, she also worked as a stringer for Marketplace. Nina has been honored with two national Edward R. Murrow Awards: In 2006, she won for her investigative reporting on VPR and in 2009 she won for her use of sound. She began her career at Wisconsin Public Radio. 

Ways to Connect

Nina Keck / VPR

This fall, more than 20 million students are expected to attend college in the United States. For first-year students and their parents, it's an especially exciting and bittersweet time.

For parents who have not been to college themselves, however, it can be confusing and unclear how best to be supportive. And for parents who may be too involved with their kids – the so-called "helicopter parents" – it can be hard to let go.

PeopleImages / iStock.com

Researchers are starting to take a closer look at what people are posting on social media and why – and they are finding some interesting things. 

Courtesy of Mary Nemeth

Many people in Rutland are debating what impact new refugees would have on the city. But immigrants from Italy, Ireland and Eastern Europe have already left indelible marks on the city.

Ric Cengeri / VPR

He took over the post of Vermont State Police director as the state was in the throes of an opiate abuse epidemic. He's had to answer questions about a new study showing racial disparities in VSP traffic stops.

Book-lovers have the opportunity to mix and mingle with authors, poets and other readers at Brattleboro's The Lounge every Thursday night. 

Charles Krupa / AP

Donald Trump's campaign continues to divide many Republicans across the country, with the candidate's controversial stances and statements leading some to decide not to vote for their own party's nominee. We're looking at how this is playing out closer to home.

IMNATURE / iStockphoto.com

Monarch butterflies are known for epic migrations, traveling thousands of miles every year. Their route can span from Mexico to Canada, which makes it difficult to protect monarchs, because there's no one single habitat to preserve.

Kent McFarland / Flickr

Are you a butterfly watcher? A beekeeper? Do you want to broaden your scope of bug knowledge to the lives and habits of moths, dragonflies and tiger beetles? You're in luck: it's our annual bug show!

Collecting daily precipitation data is the goal of a group of volunteers paying close attention to the weather. Jay Shafer, a professor of atmospheric sciences at Lyndon State College, spoke to Vermont Edition on Monday about the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, or CoCoRaHS.

ShaneKato / iStock

Your brain needs fructose and glucose. But your body can really do without the high fructose corn syrup or sucrose. And all those other added sugars hiding in processed foods and sweetened drinks.

Nina Keck / VPR

The Dorset Quarry has been touted as one of the top swimming holes in the country. But the uptick in traffic, trash and noise has turned off many locals. The quarry’s owners understand that, but they want to keep the swimming hole open and safe for future generations.

wistechcolleges / Flickr

With a tricky job market and college tuition at daunting levels, career and technical education - once called vocational education - may be looking more and more appealing to today's students.

Robert F. Bukaty / AP

While the calls of loons echo across many lakes in the region, it is not guaranteed to be something that you'll always be able to hear. The loon population has rebounded somewhat recently, but the birds are still at risk from many factors.

Xurzon / iStock

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) became law in 1990. It ensured that people with disabilities had the same rights and opportunities as all Americans.

Meg Malone / VPR

Far too often when we need to make a run to the store for groceries or other goods, we hop in the car or truck. But wouldn't be great to use your bike for a chore like that? If only your bike had the capacity to hold all those bags of stuff. In Brattleboro, there's an organization working to get more people on electric-assisted "cargobikes" to fill this need.

Vermont Department of Health

What has this summer looked like so far in terms algae blooms and the health of Lake Champlain? We're getting an update on the latest on the lake: the science of algae blooms and the state of the state's clean-up plan. 

BasieB / iStock

All that planting you did once the winter ended was invigorating. You dug, hoed and sowed, putting in vegetables, herbs, flowers, shrubs, and trees.

Ric Cengeri / VPR File

The course of history is often shaped by the outcome of battles, even small ones.  That's the case with the Battle of Bennington, which was fought back in August 1777.  Phil Holland is an English teacher at Community College of Vermont and the author of the new book A Guide to the Battle of Bennington and the Bennington Monument.

Nina Keck / VPR File

The family that owns the Rutland Herald announced late last night that it's selling the Herald and the Barre-Montpelier Times Argus to a company based in Maine that owns several newspapers and news web sites there. The announcement followed speculation about the papers' future after reports of financial problems surfaced last week.

Ric Cengeri / VPR

This primary campaign always promised to be wild and wide open with the governor's and lieutenant governor's offices up from grabs. It drew three candidates in both of the Democrat's primaries for top seats and two in the Republican gubernatorial race.

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