Patti Daniels

Executive Producer, Vermont Edition

Patti is an integral part of VPR's news effort and part of the team that created Vermont Edition. As executive producer, Patti supervises the team that puts Vermont Edition on the air every day, working with producers to select and research show ideas, select guests and develop the sound and tone of the program.

Patti has produced public affairs programs like VPR's symposia and election night coverage, and special projects like the documentaries, Phish: The Final Curtain and States of Marriage. A graduate of Bates College, Patti worked for several years on civil society projects in the former Soviet Union and the Balkans.  Patti is a marathoner and native San Diegan.

Ways to Connect

Program originally aired in September 2015: A few years ago, we dispatched a team of producers and reporters to the Champlain Valley Fair and recorded sounds and stories. It's a great listen that we're bringing back again now that we're deep into fair season.

Interview originally aired in March 2016The Chittenden Solid Waste District initiated a public art project — "The Art Of Recycling" — in collaboration with and funded by Dealer.com. Eight of the district's big receptacles were turned over to local artists to beautify. And they're pretty striking.

Vermont Edition's Jane Lindholm met with CSWD's marketing specialist Jonny Finity and local artist Mary Lacy to see a few of these containers and talk about the project.

Interview originally aired in April 2016Joseph Mazur is professor emeritus of mathematics at Marlboro College and author of Fluke: The Math & Myth of Coincidence. Mazur spoke to Vermont Edition about his book and the odds related to coincidences occurring, as well as the distinctions between coincidences, flukes and serendipity.

FILE - Rep. Pete Welch, D-Vt., speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Welch won both the Democratic and Republican nominations in August 2016 for re-election that year to a sixth term.
Lauren Victoria Burke / AP

Congressman Peter Welch has positioned himself as a Democrat who wants to work with Republicans. Polls suggest that's what Americans want from Washington, but so far bipartisanship has been hard to find in a polarized Congress.

Frequent bouts of rain and cooler weather than normal this summer have been annoying for recreation, but seriously problematic for Vermont farmers.

Nam Y. Huh / AP/file

Type 1 diabetes is a struggle for the kids who have it, and for their parents who keep a constant watch on them. And while the risks of not precisely managing the disease are enormous, technology is making huge strides in helping patients with the illness.

Yemenis present documents in order to receive food rations provided by a local charity, in Sanaa, Yemen, Thursday, April, 13, 2017. A stalemated war with Saudi Arabia has pushed the Arab world's poorest country to the brink of famine.
Hani Mohammed / AP

What’s being called the worst humanitarian crisis since World War II is unfolding right now in the Horn of Africa and parts of the Middle East. And there’s a good chance that this is the first time you’re hearing about it.

Middlebury College researchers have found that areas below 1,000 feet of elevation have 10 to 15 times the amount of ticks then at higher elevations.
SteveEllington / iStock

For such a wee little thing, the tick has sure garnered a lot of our attention. That's because it can carry Lyme disease and that's something none of us wants to experience.

We've learned a lot about how devastating opiate addiction is for families and communities but on the next Vermont Edition, we're taking the conversation about addiction to the cellular level.

The gloved hand of a biologist holds a little brown bat in Vermont.
Jane Lindholm / VPR File

Stand outside at night and you might glimpse the swift, darting profile of a bat flying overhead. That sight wasn't rare in the past, but bats in this region have had it rough for years due to white-nose syndrome, and biologists are still working to understand and protect these tiny flying mammals.

A "rape kit" is a forensic medical exam that is done by highly trained nurses. Vermont has only 53 forensic nurses, and that means in some communities, when a victim goes to an emergency room after an assault, there isn't a nurse there who is trained to collect a rape kit.

This week, Gov. Phil Scott signed a bill into law that encourages hospitals and nurses to creates pools of on-call services, so that victims can receive immediate care when they arrive at a hospital requesting a forensic exam.

Vermont will study how so-called 'rape kits' are processed into evidence, as part of a new law that Gov. Phil Scott signed on Tuesday, July 17, 2017.
Rick Bowmer / AP

The governor signed two bills on Tuesday that extend protections for victims of sexual assault and domestic violence. Some of the changes have been long in coming for the advocates who work on these issues.

The Guildhall Public Library dates from 1901. We're talking about how libraries fund the services they provide to Vermonters.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Among many other records, Vermont can boast more public libraries per person than any other state in the union. How those libraries get their funding is far from uniform; it can vary greatly from town to town. We're talking about how libraries get the money they use, how they deal with funding challenges, and how it all affects the services they offer to Vermonters.

People of all abilities can find hiking trails to suit them in Vermont. (Some are muddier than others.)
Patti Daniels / VPR

These long summer days in Vermont are fantastic, but how do you get the most out of the season without breaking the bank? We crowd-sourced your ideas for inexpensive — better yet, free! — ways to enjoy summer.

Vermont Attorney General TJ Donovan, pictured here in Montpelier in January, has joined a lawsuit aimed at preventing President Donald Trump from rescinding DACA. We're talking to him about that decision.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR file

In his six first months as Vermont attorney general, TJ Donovan has put a spotlight on the health insurance market and predatory college loans – policy issues that he says come down to consumer protection.

Boston Red Sox third baseman Tzu-Wei Lin swings at a pitch during the 8th inning of a baseball game against the Texas Rangers on Tuesday, July 4, 2017, in Arlington, Texas. We're talking about what's coming in the second half of the season.
Michael Ainsworth / Associated Press

The Red Sox started the baseball season sluggish, but now they're fired up. The Yankees meanwhile, got off to a great start but now they're floundering. On this episode of Vermont Edition, it's our annual summer baseball show!

This label is showing up more frequently alongside bins for recycling and trash.
Toby Talbot / AP

Vermont is now three years into its plan to get the whole state on board with universal recycling and composting.  But when you look at the number inside the triangle with arrows, do you know immediately what kind of plastic it is and how to recycle it? And are you occasionally still scrapping food scraps into the garbage?

A new legislative committee is meeting this summer and fall to improve the state's response to the issue of childhood trauma.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

Lawmakers could have overridden two vetoes when they returned to Montpelier on Wednesday. The governor's veto of a pot legalization bill stands, but legislators did strike a deal to approve the state budget. However, their compromise with Gov. Phil Scott puts school boards on the hook to find cost savings.

South Burlington High School and Milton Middle School have both had rocky conversations about race and inclusion during this school year.
BeholdingEye / iStock

A few recent highly publicized racial incidents at schools have left some Vermonters unsettled, but minority communities say racial bias in schools is an everyday experience, not an outlier. Vermont Edition looks at what Vermont schools should do to address racism.

The golden dome of the Vermont Statehouse with a blue sky background.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

Disagreement over health care contracts for employees at public schools prompted next week's veto session, but it's not clear if the Republican governor and Democratic lawmakers will be able to bridge the divide between them on this issue.

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