Patti Daniels

Executive Producer, Vermont Edition

Patti is an integral part of VPR's news effort and part of the team that created Vermont Edition. As executive producer, Patti supervises the team that puts Vermont Edition on the air every day, working with producers to select and research show ideas, select guests and develop the sound and tone of the program.

Patti has produced public affairs programs like VPR's symposia and election night coverage, and special projects like the documentaries, Phish: The Final Curtain and States of Marriage. A graduate of Bates College, Patti worked for several years on civil society projects in the former Soviet Union and the Balkans.  Patti is a marathoner and native San Diegan.

Ways to Connect

Candace Page headshot.
Courtesy

Vermont reporter Candace Page, who spent more than 30 years at the Burlington Free Press, was inducted into the New England Newspaper Hall of Fame in February. 

Jim Lo Scalzo / AP

President Trump spoke to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday night, and we'll hear reactions to what he said on Wednesday's Vermont Edition.

Charles Murray, an influential writer who espouses controversial theories on race and socioeconomics, is speaking at Middlebury College on Thursday. His appearance is prompting questions about the format of the speech and the role of the college's Political Science Department in organizing the lecture.

Patti Daniels / VPR

Vermont's Republican governor asked the Legislature to deliver a state law that blunts some of federal law enforcement's ability to identify undocumented people for deportation. The state Senate unanimously agreed, and now the House will weigh in. So where do Republican legislators stand on the question?

Gina Nemirofsky / Ten Times Ten LLC

You know the story of Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani girl who was almost assassinated for advocating for girls' education, and who later won a Nobel Peace Prize for efforts. But a new book by Vermont writer reminds us there are millions of Malalas in the world, and the barriers to their education are profound.

Jane Lindholm / VPR

Student newspapers at high schools and colleges are often the proving ground for budding journalists. But in Vermont right now, there's a debate over how much "freedom of the press" applies to these young news gatherers.

Nina Keck / VPR

People across Vermont and around the world have been transfixed by the immigration story that has unfolded in the last two weeks - and especially the impact on refugees. In the midst of it, VPR's Nina Keck was reporting on the Syrian refugee crisis from Jordan.

Patti Daniels / VPR

The legal fight continues over who can and can't enter the United States in the wake of the Trump administration's executive order on immigration and refugees. 

Patti Daniels / VPR

The federal court ruling this weekend on U.S. immigration policy means that refugee arrivals to Vermont could restart in the next 10 days.

Patti Daniels / VPR

VPR has been following the developing story of refugee settlement and the impact in Vermont of President Donald Trump's policy change last week.

Here is an update on work that has halted and work that continues with refugees in Vermont.

Ryan Caron King / NENC

Rutland City Mayor Christopher Louras says an executive order expected from President Donald Trump later this week would quash plans to resettle 100 Syrian refugees in the city.  

PhotoBylove / iStock.com

The Vermont Department of Labor and the J. Warren & Lois McClure Foundation has updated its list of the top "high-pay, high-demand" jobs projected for Vermont over the next 10 years – and the educational requirements needed to obtain them.

Raad Adayleh / AP

Refugee families from Syria, the first of about a hundred individuals who might be resettled in Rutland in the coming year, have begun to arrive. But millions of other displaced Syrians remain behind while they await security approval to be resettled in another country.

Photo courtesy Lake Champlain Basin Program

One-point-three billion dollars. That's the total amount the state thinks it needs to clean up Lake Champlain and other waterways over the next 20 years.  So where does the money come from? The Treasurer's Office has just released a report that maps out how to raise most of that funding.

Angela Evancie / VPR file

Vermont's new governor Phil Scott is our guest Friday at noon on the next Vermont Edition for a live, one-hour interview.

Angela Evancie / VPR/file

Bill Sorrell served as Vermont's attorney general from 1997 until just a couple of days into 2017, when new Attorney General T.J. Donovan took office.

Patti Daniels / VPR

A new University of Vermont study shows disparities in how police officers around the state treat drivers of different races. 

Patti Daniels / VPR

On Monday morning, new data was released on police traffic stops from more than two dozen local police departments in Vermont. The researchers who compiled the data say black and Hispanic drivers are significantly more likely to be stopped by police in Vermont than white drivers.

Meg Malone / VPR/file

On Wednesday,  an era begins in Vermont state government when the new Legislature convenes, and new leadership takes over in the House and Senate.  Vermont Edition is broadcasting live from the ornate Cedar Creek Room at the Statehouse for the opening day of the Legislature.

Steve Zind / VPR

There's an idealized image of agriculture that has animals, the environment, food and farmers themselves thriving in a balanced ecosystem.

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