Ric Cengeri

Vermont Edition Producer

Ric is a Vermont Edition producer. Prior to joining VPR in 2007, Ric was the morning show host at WNCS in Montpelier. Before that, he hosted the morning show at WOXY in Oxford, Ohio.

Interwoven with his radio experience, Ric has been a senior copy writer and account supervisor for McGuire & Associates, a Florida-based advertising agency. He has also taught media writing classes at Miami University.

An expert in polo and British soccer, Ric holds a B.S. from the University of Dayton and an M.S. from St. Thomas University.

Ways to Connect

Glasses, a book and a mug sit on a wood table in front of a couch with pillows.
wernerimages / iStockphoto.com

Live call-in discussion: One of life's joys is losing yourself in the pages of a good read. As it gets colder outside, we're talking about books to cozy up with — and we want to hear what titles you suggest your fellow listeners check out.

Peaslee's cubed, frozen, Vermont potatoes go from freezer to oven.
Melissa Pasanen, courtesy

The potato business has changed since 1928 when Karen Guile-Caron's grandparents started Peaslee's Vermont Potatoes in Guildhall. Now, Guile-Caron is trying to bring her 60-acre family business into the new local food economy.

Person with arms extended looking at a sunset.
Irudayam / Flickr Creative Commons

On the day before Thanksgiving, what are are you grateful for? Wednesday on Vermont Edition, we're exploring who and what makes us feel gratitude, and how we can turn feelings of gratefulness into action.

You know it's out there, but how can you spot fake news and combat it? We discuss those issues on "Vermont Edition."
Cnora / iStock

Where is the tipping point between a media source having a bias and one that is reporting fake news? And how can you spot news that really is fake?

Brendan Nyhan, Dartmouth College professor of government joins us to answer these questions and how to combat the preponderance of fake news.

Family and farmworkers gather to celebrate a birthday meal at Rockville Market Farm in Starksboro.
Keenann Rozendaal / Seven Days

Eggs and butternut squash are two of the items that Rockville Market Farm in Starksboro are best known for. But the bond between the family that runs the farm and it workers, is just as healthy as the organic foods they produce.

Sen. Bernie Sanders - pictured here on Capitol Hill on Oct. 17 with Sen. Debbie Stabenow, Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Shumer - joins "Vermont Edition" to discuss key issues, including the proposed GOP tax plan.
Andrew Harnik / Associated Press

Completing a week when Vermont Edition has heard from all of the state's congressional delegation, Sen. Bernie Sanders joins us on the program.

Brattleboro is one of Vermont's designated downtowns, a program that develops and implements a comprehensive revitalization strategy.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Vermont's villages are facing serious challenges from big box stores, online retailers and rising rent bills. Vermont Edition looks at how downtown businesses around the state are changing to meet those demands.

The flavor of pumpkin spice is everywhere this time of year, but not everyone is a fan.
Suzanne Podhaizer / Seven Days

Pumpkin and nutmeg and cinnamon, oh boy! Pumpkin spice season is exploding once again with all types of foods and drinks embracing the flavor, like pies, pasta dishes, lattes and more. But maybe your reaction to these seasonal seasonings is, oh no!

piles of cardboard box recycling
danielvfung / iStock

Recyclable materials are one of the US's major exports. And a lot of our "stuff" goes to China. Recent policy changes coming out of Beijing are aimed at restricting what material comes from the United States. That's having a major effect on the US waste system.

Sarah Reeves, general manager at the Chittenden Solid Waste District, tells Vermont Edition how these Chinese policy changes are going to be felt in Vermont and why it's important to be vigilant about following recycling guidelines.

New Hampshire Senator Jeanne Shaheen, shown speaking on Capitol Hill in Washington, joins "Vermont Edition" to discuss key issues facing the Senate.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / Associated Press

New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen discusses some of the top issues facing the Senate, including health care, North Korea, the Republican tax plan and protecting domestic violence victims.

Hemp plants at Green Mountain CBD's farm in Hardwick, taken earlier this year.
Jon Kalish / For VPR

Growing hemp became legal in Vermont in 2013 and today more than 90 people are registered to grow it here. Vermont Edition looks at the differences between hemp, CBD (Cannabidiol) and marijuana, and where these industries and products are in Vermont today.

Gov. Scott's Marijuana Commission is trying to decide what legalization should look like in Vermont.
Labuda / iStock

Earlier this year, Gov. Phil Scott created a special commission to study the possibility of approving recreational marijuana use in Vermont. The commission began meeting in late September.

Chefs working on projects at the James Beard Foundation Chefs Boot Camp for Policy and Change held this fall at Shelburne Farms.
Melissa Pasanen, Courtesy

When you hear about a boot camp for chefs, you probably envision great cooks preparing fine meals while bedecked in an apron and carrying a rolling pin. That wasn't exactly what went down at The James Beard Foundation Chefs Boot Camp for Policy and Change. 

Robert Siegel spent more than 40 years working in radio news, and has reported from across the country and around the globe. Senior host of NPR's All Things Considered since 1987, he'll be stepping away from the mic in January 2018.
Stephen Voss / NPR

Robert Siegel, senior host of NPR's All Things Considered, is speaking to the Vermont Humanities Council this week, reflecting on more than four decades working in radio newsrooms. It's an apt time for reflection for the seasoned host, as he prepares to step away from the mic and retire in January 2018.

Deicing winter roads by applying salt is poisoning Vermont's ecosystems, and experts say it’s over-salting by private contractors in parking lots and other urban areas that are increasingly the source of the salt.
Modfos / iStock

Salt used for deicing and winter road management is poisoning Vermont's ecosystems, but it isn't coming from where you'd think. Parking lots and congested urban areas are increasingly the source of the salt, winter managers say. Drivers expecting visibly salted roads, and a lack of standards for private companies offering salting services, has many calling for tough standards to stop the problem cold.

A spooky sampler of ghost stories, Green Mountain hauntings and more.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Maybe it's just the Halloween spirit, but Vermont seems extra spooky in the fall. And trust us when we say that there have been enough stories of ghosts and spirits haunting the Green Mountain State to make things interesting.

On this "Vermont Edition," we look at the performance of Vermont Health Connect, which had many problems when it first went online.
screenshot from Vermont Health Connect

As Congress debates the future of the Affordable Care Act, a new enrollment period begins next week. We take this opportunity to assess how Vermont Health Connect is faring today after the series of technical problems that has riddled it in the past.

Spirulina is an edible type of blue-green algae being grown at a green house in Johnson.
Sally Pollak / Seven Days

Blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) is no friend to those who enjoy a swim in the lake but, in another form, is actually edible, high in protein and rich in certain vitamins. It's called spirulina and being grown right here in Vermont.   

A pasture full of cows overlooks the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant in Vernon, Vt. Robbie Leppzer's film "Power Struggle" documents efforts to close Vermont Yankee; the plant was closed in 2014.
Robbie Leppzer / PowerStruggleMovie.com, courtesy

The Vermont International Film Festival is screening a documentary on Sunday chronicling the grassroots movement to close the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant, and the events both global and local that surrounded its closure in 2014.

The cast of "Mill Girls" at the Champlain Mill in Winooski. There will be free performances of the show at Saint Michael's College in November.
Jerry Swope / Saint Michael's College

A new play premiering at Saint Michael's College tells the story of the women who worked the textile mills in Winooski and across New England in the mid-1800s. But it's also a story about America's shift from small towns to big cities, how women were treated and compensated in the country's earliest factories, the fight for workers' rights and the mills' connections to slavery before the Civil War.

Pages