Ric Cengeri

Vermont Edition Producer

Ric is a Vermont Edition producer. Prior to joining VPR in 2007, Ric was the morning show host at WNCS in Montpelier. Before that, he hosted the morning show at WOXY in Oxford, Ohio.

Interwoven with his radio experience, Ric has been a senior copy writer and account supervisor for McGuire & Associates, a Florida-based advertising agency. He has also taught media writing classes at Miami University.

An expert in polo and British soccer, Ric holds a B.S. from the University of Dayton and an M.S. from St. Thomas University.

Ways to Connect

Interview originally aired in May 2016: Vermont may be a small state, but it has produced many cartoonists over the years. Vermont Edition spoke to Rachel LindsayStephen Bissette and Robert Waldo Brunelle, Jr., who discussed why they became cartoonists, the business in the digital age and what the cartooning community in Vermont is like.

From urban spaces to rural places, food trucks are really popular in Vermont and, now, much easier to locate thanks to the "Vermont Food Truck Finder."
Maica / iStock

At one time, it was a quirky thing when a food truck showed up at your office once or twice a week. Then came food truck round-ups and, now, there's an explosion of food trucks along the highways and byways of Vermont. Luckily, Seven Days is helping us keep track of 'em all with the Vermont Food Truck Finder!

St. Michael's College graduates Danny Divis, left, and Justin McKenzie, right, throw out first pitches at the Boston Red Sox's "Vermont Night" at Fenway Park on Aug. 5. The two hockey players were awarded the Hockey Humanitarian Award last spring.
Dan Brown / Kapitol Photography

Danny Divis and Justin McKenzie, recent St. Michael's College graduates who played on the hockey team, started the mental health awareness campaign Hope Happens Here while they were students. This past spring they were recognized with the Hockey Humanitarian Award, a national honor for collegiate athletes who give back to their community.

Marjorie Susman and Marian Pollack, farmers and cheese makers at Orb Weaver Farm in New Haven, in front of the cave where they age their signature Colby-style cheese into a version closer to a nutty aged Gouda.
Melissa Pasanen, courtesy / Culture

The process of maturing or aging cheeses to peak ripeness is traditional in Europe, but a more recently adopted practice in the United States. 

Interview originally aired in March 2016The Chittenden Solid Waste District initiated a public art project — "The Art Of Recycling" — in collaboration with and funded by Dealer.com. Eight of the district's big receptacles were turned over to local artists to beautify. And they're pretty striking.

Vermont Edition's Jane Lindholm met with CSWD's marketing specialist Jonny Finity and local artist Mary Lacy to see a few of these containers and talk about the project.

Interview originally aired in April 2016Joseph Mazur is professor emeritus of mathematics at Marlboro College and author of Fluke: The Math & Myth of Coincidence. Mazur spoke to Vermont Edition about his book and the odds related to coincidences occurring, as well as the distinctions between coincidences, flukes and serendipity.

A few styles of beer available at Brocklebank Craft Brewing in Tunbridge.
Hannah Palmer Egan / Seven Days

For those of you too young to remember the dark ages of beer, there was a time when there were no micro-breweries; only national brands, a few local brews, and imports. But now, a new brewery has opened in Vermont since you started reading this. 

The pirate ship Aladdin sailed on Lake Champlain from 1929 to 1939. Boys at South Hero's Adventurers Camp used the ship as a mobile classroom.
Baker Family Collection, Courtesy

During the Great Depression a pirate ship and its crew sailed around Lake Champlain, hoisting the Jolly Roger while anchored just off the shore of Plattsburgh and even making its way up the river to Montreal.

The Cowmobile is one of the endearing images of Ben & Jerry's. We discuss how important the social mission is to the company today.
Jonathansloane / iStock

Ben & Jerry's has always been a company that stands for something, a company that has a heart. But 17 years after it was sold to global food conglomerate Unilever, we check in to see if the company's social mission is still in place.

A new study shows that even a small amount of development around a lake can put the body of water at risk of salinization.
Wilson Ring / Associated Press

Here in the north country, we spread a lot of salt on our roadways to melt the ice that causes hazardous winter driving conditions. But that salt has to go somewhere.  Flora Krivak-Tetley, a PhD student in Biology at Dartmouth College, is part of a group of researchers with the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network that has been taking a look at how salt is affecting waterbodies from Maine to the Midwest.

An archaeological dig at Jamaica State Park in 2010 found ample evidence that the site was a seasonal fishing camp at least 7,000 years ago.
VPR FILE

When we discuss archaeology in Vermont, it's not about dinosaurs or the homesteads of noted figures who lived here. Instead, we focus on the things that the everyday people who preceded us  left behind as clues about their daily existence.

A customer enjoys Bad Larry's Maple Madness, one of Canteen Creemee Company's creative "next level" creemee sundaes.
Daria Bishop, courtesy / Vermont Life

What if you were a chef known for creating delicious gourmet meals, but part of you had a love of making great burgers, fried chicken, lush milkshakes or creemees? Well, some area chefs have opened snack bars and creemee stands to harness these less formal culinary desires.   

A statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee is removed from Lee Circle in New Orleans in May, the last of four monuments to Confederate-era figures to be removed.
Scott Threlkeld / Associated Press

The issue of how we judge historical figures has been in the news a lot lately. We're discussing how present-day perspectives can alter our view of the past.  

Middlebury College researchers have found that areas below 1,000 feet of elevation have 10 to 15 times the amount of ticks then at higher elevations.
SteveEllington / iStock

For such a wee little thing, the tick has sure garnered a lot of our attention. That's because it can carry Lyme disease and that's something none of us wants to experience.

We've learned a lot about how devastating opiate addiction is for families and communities but on the next Vermont Edition, we're taking the conversation about addiction to the cellular level.

A Hardwick log yard in 2004.
AP Photo/Toby Talbot

We hear a lot about Vermont's agricultural economy, but what about our working forests? Trees  cover more than 75 percent of Vermont. In past years the state's forest products industry has supported loggers, truckers and mills but its in decline and jobs and markets have been disappearing.

Stokes with his record-breaking fish.
Courtesy: Vt. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife

One of Vermont's most accomplished anglers is 11-year-old Chase Stokes of Ferrisburgh, who recently entered the record books for a carp he caught in Otter Creek.

Emily Herr, who created this mural in Richmond, Virginia, is headed to Burlington to paint a wall as part of her Girls Girls Girls Mural Tour.
Emily Herr / HerrSuite

Emily Herr receives commissions to paint murals in her hometown of Richmond, Virginia. But it was one of her personal pieces, highlighting everyday women, that spawned a painting tour that will bring her to Burlington next week.

Herr shared her thoughts about what she calls the "Girls Girls Girls" Mural Tour with Vermont Edition.

The gloved hand of a biologist holds a little brown bat in Vermont.
Jane Lindholm / VPR File

Stand outside at night and you might glimpse the swift, darting profile of a bat flying overhead. That sight wasn't rare in the past, but bats in this region have had it rough for years due to white-nose syndrome, and biologists are still working to understand and protect these tiny flying mammals.

Chef Jesse Lauer serves guests in his home during one of his pop-up dinners dubbed "Dinner with Friends."
Matthew Thorson / Seven Days

If you're an adventurous eater, you might just be interested in a 12-course meal of exquisite recipes never before prepared by the chef. Well, that's just what's served when you pull up a chair at the home of Chef Jesse Lauer.

Pages