Ric Cengeri

Vermont Edition Producer

Ric is a Vermont Edition producer. Prior to joining VPR in 2007, Ric was the morning show host at WNCS in Montpelier. Before that, he hosted the morning show at WOXY in Oxford, Ohio.

Interwoven with his radio experience, Ric has been a senior copy writer and account supervisor for McGuire & Associates, a Florida-based advertising agency. He has also taught media writing classes at Miami University.

An expert in polo and British soccer, Ric holds a B.S. from the University of Dayton and an M.S. from St. Thomas University.

Ways to Connect

A family photo of Suzanne Bombardier, the 14-year-old victim of a 1980 cold case murder.
Antioch Police Department

People around the country have been fascinated by the story of the Golden State Killer, the research by the late true-crime writer Michelle McNamara, and the arrest of a suspect in the decades-long mystery back in April. But one Vermont College of Fine Arts student's writing about a different California cold case generated interest of its own that caught investigator's attention and eventually an arrest.

Traditional CSA items are still popular, like those from 1000 Stone Farm in Brookfield (pictured), but many producers are now offering niche products like cheese, meat and more.
Courtesy, 1000 Stone Farm / Seven Days

Paying a seasonal fee for a weekly cache of greens and root veggies from a local farm remains popular in Vermont; however, the model of community supported agriculture (CSA) is evolving. In order to offer convenience to customers, many CSA programs are now offering flexible purchase plans and more product options. These approaches also allow more farmers to get in the game.

Yvan Plouffe shows off some of his pottery creations. He took up the craft 10 years ago at the age of 70.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

Charlotte's Yvan Plouffe is a retired dairy farmer who sugars, tends to his plum and peach trees, and raises 10,000 roses every year to hand out all around town. He also does woodwork, metalwork and pottery, the latter of which he took up just ten years ago at age 70. And he lives in a house he built himself, along with most of the furniture inside of it.

Jack Sawyer in Vermont Superior Court.
Ryan Mercer / The Burlington Free Press via Associated Press, Pool File

In February, Jack Sawyer was accused of a thwarted shooting plot involving Fair Haven Union High School. Already the case against the 18-year-old Poultney man has taken many twists and turns. We'll look at what has transpired so far in the case and how it's grabbed the attention of the entire state.

Elementary school students in Starksboro listen as Eugenie Doyle of Last Resort Farm reads from her book, "Sleep Tight Farm."
Matthew Thorsen / Seven Days

Writing a letter? Having a pen pal? These may seem a little old-fashioned but both are alive and well thanks to NOFA-VT (The Northeast Organic Farming Association of Vermont). They've come up with a program that connects young students with local farmers through correspondence and field trips.

Daria Bishop / VPR

When it comes to the dairy industry in Vermont, there are a lot of questions and myriad answers. We get a lot of both as we listen to a recent "News & Brews" event held at VPR that explored the relationship between agriculture and the environment.

Christina Nolan
VPR

U.S. Attorney for the District of Vermont Christina Nolan says the opioid crisis—including related violence and human trafficking—is a top priority for her office, one she says will emphasize prosecutions to reduce the amount of opioids in the state.

We're talking about philosophy as a discipline and a way of thinking - and its relevance to everyday life.
Jakarin2521 / iStock

Philosophy can get a bad rap as a subject only for scholars and academics, with little use in the real world. But many in the field say that philosophy doesn't have to be inaccessible; it can be a tool we use to tackle a wide range of the problems that we face every day. We're delving into this ancient subject and exploring how philosophy is relevant today.

A student at the Thetford Outdoor Program chops wood to fuel an evaporator for maple sugaring.
Sarah Preistap / Seven Days

When it comes to producing maple syrup in Vermont, the younger generation is not only embracing the tradition, but also trying to make it better. In this podcast, we'll hear about high schoolers just learning the classic art of sugaring as well as a couple of college students who are innovating the process. 

ansonsaw / iStock

In his 2014 State of the State address, Gov. Peter Shumlin highlighted the severity and far-reaching impact of Vermont's opioid crisis. Four years later, the state is still struggling with the deadly effects of that crisis. We're talking to Vermonters who have lived with addiction and are now in recovery, to hear their thoughts on the topic.

Incumbent Rep. Peter Welch faces two challengers for the Democratic nomination for his seat.
Alex Brandon / Associated Press File

Rep. Peter Welch has joined a bipartisan effort of House members who want to protect Special Counsel Robert Mueller from being fired by President Donald Trump.

"Vermont Edition" hears from GOP Legislative leaders on some of the key issues that remain to be decided in the final weeks of the biennium.
Ric Cengeri / VPR

The end of the Legislative session looms, but there is still time for movement on a number of key issues. We get input on education funding, financing clean water efforts, the state minimum wage and paid family leave from the Republican legislative leadership.

The spotted salamander adds a colorful dash to the Vermont outdoors. And now is a great time of year to see them.
JasonOndreicka / iStock

As the temperatures slowly climb northward, you're about to see a lot of movement outside. Especially if you look really closely at the spring migration of reptiles and amphibians.

The Vermont Legislature is looking for ways to shift the educational fund burden from property taxes to income taxes. H.911 includes legislation that would spell out how that can be accomplsihed.
ParkerDeen / iStock

Ask any legislator in Montpelier and they'll probably agree that getting the state's education funding model right could be their most difficult task. Now a bill passed by the House sets about shifting some of the burden of paying for our schools from property taxes to income taxes.

A puppy sits and looks sadly at the camera.
TatyanaGI / iStock

There might be nothing to ever equal the unbridled joy of bringing home a new dog. As the pup races around its new home smelling the thousands of smells that live in its new abode, it's hard not to share the excitement. Then the real work starts — training your new pooch.

A blue-green illustration of a brain.
Jakarin2521 / iStock

As artificial intelligence continues to develop, concerns grow about its invasive nature and reach. How much are we willing to cede to the machines, and what effect will that have on our lives?

The Vermont House recently passed a bill that would create an AI commission to address these subjects.

A chocolate pig with tiny chocolate piglets inside is just one of the many Easter novelties created by chocolatier, Pier Normandeau, at L'Oeuf in Mystic, QC.
Sally Pollak / Seven Days

There's a little place north of the border that makes you feel as though you've been transported to a small, French village. A Québécois Brigadoon, if you will. It's called L'Oeuf - a French country restaurant and chocolate shop where chocolate takes center stage this time of year.  

Handy with the lot of these? Then you're in high demand for the "Repair Cafe" scheduled for April 28 in Hardwick.
anilakkus / iStock

If you fancy yourself a Mr. or Ms. Fix-It, or maybe you're more of a "Need a Ms. Fix-It" kind of person, we've got a matchmaking event for you! 

The Central Vermont Solid Waste Management District, the Onion River Exchange and the Center for an Agricultural Economy are working together to host a Repair Cafe in Hardwick at the end of April.

Vermont Republican Party, Courtesy

The Vermont Republican Party has a new executive director. Jack Moulton replaced Jeff Bartley, who stepped down suddenly in January after three years in the position.

A Drug Free School Zone sign on a chain link fence with a playground in the background.
duckycards / iStock

As the state continues to battle the opioid abuse crisis, ways of fighting it have taken many different forms — including focusing on drug prevention strategies in our schools.

On this Vermont Edition, we look around the state to learn what's being done to deliver that anti-drug message to our kids and also look at the effectiveness of these efforts.

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