Sam Gale Rosen

Vermont Edition Managing Editor

Sam Gale Rosen is managing editor for Vermont Edition. He joined VPR in 2015 after working for six years at WBUR Boston as a producer for On Point.

Sam studied history and literature at Harvard University and was born and raised in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

Ways to Connect

Robert Siegel spent more than 40 years working in radio news, and has reported from across the country and around the globe. Senior host of NPR's All Things Considered since 1987, he'll be stepping away from the mic in January 2018.
Stephen Voss / NPR

Robert Siegel, senior host of NPR's All Things Considered, is speaking to the Vermont Humanities Council this week, reflecting on more than four decades working in radio newsrooms. It's an apt time for reflection for the seasoned host, as he prepares to step away from the mic and retire in January 2018.

Wikimedia Creative Commons

What do the Vermont companies King Arthur Flour, Gardener's Supply, PC Construction, and Switchback Brewing have in common? They're all employee-owned businesses.

NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/CI Lab, courtesy

It was a violent collision hundreds of millions of light years away, the likes of which forged the gold found in our jewelry and the uranium in our stockpile of nuclear bombs. Scientists around the globe announced Monday groundbreaking observations of two neutron stars crashing together at nearly the speed of light. A Dartmouth physicist asserts it's the beginning of a new field of scientific discovery.

Aita Gurung allegedly killed his wife at the family's home on Hyde Street in Burlington on Oct. 12. Just days before, on Oct. 7, he had self-reported to Burlington Police his involvement in a domestic violence incident.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

About half of the murders that have taken place in Vermont over the past 20 years have been related to domestic violence.

We're talking about that persistent, deadly link between domestic violence and homicide, and what steps can be taken by the state going forward to stop both.

Allegations have come to light against Harvey Weinstein of decades of sexual misconduct. We're hosting a discussion about sexual assault and harassment.
Vince Bucci / AP

The uncovering of decades of alleged sexual assault by Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein is spurring widespread discussion. There's revulsion, but also - recognition. "Me too," say thousands of women. We're talking about what that means - and what can be done about a culture of violence and pervasive misogyny.

Pixabay/Public Domain

Librarian and privacy advocate Jessamyn West was outraged when she heard about the massive data breach affecting 134 million people at credit reporting agency Equifax. So the Randolph librarian decided to sue the multi-billion dollar company in Vermont Small Claims Court.

As the country struggles with the opioid crisis, we're talking about pain management with a local expert.
ChesiireCat / iStock

As the state and the country struggle with the opioid crisis, there is a renewed public focus on the treatment of pain. We're talking with a top local expert about the full landscape of pain management - opioids, but also other methods of treatment - and how doctors balance risk and benefit. 

What's the best thing that happened to you this week? Sam Sanders asks listeners of his show that question, and now we've invited Sam on "Vermont Edition" to put this question out to our listeners.
SchulteProductions / iStock

The news has been really difficult to process lately, and people are understandably searching for good in the world. Vermont Edition invites listeners to come together and share the things that have still managed to make them smile in the past few days.

Vermont prides itself on a history of leadership on civil rights issues, but it doesn't mean that there aren't complications — many of them — to the narrative of Vermont's unbroken civil rights leadership.

It's American Archives Month, and former state archivist Gregory Sanford talked to us to illuminate some of the complications he's unearthed through his research in the Vermont state archives.

We're talking to a couple of the people behind a new UVM production of a play dealing with issues of incarceration and the death penalty in America.
powerofforever / iStock

The Exonerated tells the story of six death row inmates who were wrongfully convicted and later had their convictions overturned and were released. We're talking to the director and an actor from a new production of the play at the University of Vermont. We'll discuss the play itself and the big issues it explores around incarceration and the justice system.

Sept. 24 through Sept. 30 is 2017's "Banned Books Week" across the country. Librarian Angele Mott Nickerson talked to "Vermont Edition" about how the state is marking the occasion.
AJT / iStockphoto.com

If you're an author whose book is banned or challenged, your work is in pretty good company. This week is "Banned Books Week" across the country, and Vermont Edition talked with librarian Angele Mott Nickerson of Shelburne's Pierson Library about how Vermont is marking the occasion.

President Chester A. Arthur - in cutout form - presides over the town office in Fairfield, Vermont back on Aug. 14, 2009. We're talking about Arthur's life and his unexpected presidency.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press

Former president Chester A. Arthur often gets short shrift — even here in the state of his birth, where he's frequently referred to as "Vermont's other president." Today we're giving Arthur some attention.

We got questions and comments from many of you after our discussion of Ben & Jerry's social mission with Will Allen. Here's some of what we found out.
Kathleen Masterson / VPR/file

Back in August, Vermont Edition had a discussion about whether Ben & Jerry's is fulfilling its social mission. We got a lot of feedback on that show, and a lot of it was critical specifically of some of the statements made by one of our guests, Will Allen.

e_chaya / Flickr, https://flic.kr/p/4wMeCa

A new study has found that Vermont is losing 1,500 acres of forest every year. That's in the context of a potential loss of more than 1 million acres in New England over the next 50 years. We're looking at the loss of forest cover and the consequences for the health of our landscape - from wildlife to water quality.

Turnpike Road in Norwich was damaged during flash flooding this past summer. VPR's Howard Weiss-Tisman spoke to "Vermont Edition" about his recent stories looking at flood insurance.
Rebecca Sananes / VPR

Flooding is a serious business, and VPR's Howard Weiss-Tisman has been looking at the vital topic of flood insurance — which may not even continue to exist in its current form, with change occurring both in the climate and in Washington. He joins this Vermont Edition to talk about his reporting.

Jane Lindholm / VPR

Parents of small children will know the angst of figuring out the best way to try to get them to sleep through the night.

Keeping kids with allergies away from certain foods is a serious business. We're talking about how schools handle the challenge.
jjpoole / iStock

Serious — potentially deadly — food allergies are on the rise among kids. We're looking at how schools manage these situations, with limited resources and a diverse population of children to keep educated and fed. 

Many questions remain about the proposed sale of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant. We're looking at all the latest developments on this "Vermont Edition."
Toby Talbot / Associated Press File

Many questions still remain about the future of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant, as the plant's potential sale undergoes various forms of review. 

This interview originally aired in May 2017: Scientists and engineers take spider silk very seriously. It has a combined strength and elasticity that humans manufacturing still can't match. And it's a still mystery exactly how the arachnids pull that off.

Vermont Attorney General TJ Donovan, pictured here in Montpelier in January, has joined a lawsuit aimed at preventing President Donald Trump from rescinding DACA. We're talking to him about that decision.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR file

President Donald Trump's decision to end DACA - the program that protects young undocumented immigrants from deportation - has been met with strong reactions. That includes a multi-state lawsuit challenging the ending of the program.

We're talking to Vermont Attorney General TJ Donovan about his decision to join that lawsuit and the impact that the DACA phase-out would have in our state.

Pages