Sam Gale Rosen

Vermont Edition Managing Editor

Sam Gale Rosen is managing editor for Vermont Edition. He joined VPR in 2015 after working for six years at WBUR Boston as a producer for On Point.

Sam studied history and literature at Harvard University and was born and raised in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

Ways to Connect

Turnpike Road in Norwich was damaged during flash flooding this past summer. VPR's Howard Weiss-Tisman spoke to "Vermont Edition" about his recent stories looking at flood insurance.
Rebecca Sananes / VPR

Flooding is a serious business, and VPR's Howard Weiss-Tisman has been looking at the vital topic of flood insurance — which may not even continue to exist in its current form, with change occurring both in the climate and in Washington. He joins this Vermont Edition to talk about his reporting.

Jane Lindholm / VPR

Parents of small children will know the angst of figuring out the best way to try to get them to sleep through the night.

Keeping kids with allergies away from certain foods is a serious business. We're talking about how schools handle the challenge.
jjpoole / iStock

Serious — potentially deadly — food allergies are on the rise among kids. We're looking at how schools manage these situations, with limited resources and a diverse population of children to keep educated and fed. 

Many questions remain about the proposed sale of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant. We're looking at all the latest developments on this "Vermont Edition."
Toby Talbot / Associated Press File

Many questions still remain about the future of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant, as the plant's potential sale undergoes various forms of review. 

This interview originally aired in May 2017: Scientists and engineers take spider silk very seriously. It has a combined strength and elasticity that humans manufacturing still can't match. And it's a still mystery exactly how the arachnids pull that off.

Vermont Attorney General TJ Donovan, pictured here in Montpelier in January, has joined a lawsuit aimed at preventing President Donald Trump from rescinding DACA. We're talking to him about that decision.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR file

President Donald Trump's decision to end DACA - the program that protects young undocumented immigrants from deportation - has been met with strong reactions. That includes a multi-state lawsuit challenging the ending of the program.

We're talking to Vermont Attorney General TJ Donovan about his decision to join that lawsuit and the impact that the DACA phase-out would have in our state.

A moose enjoys a rainy day in Woodbury, Vermont. We're talking about the state of the state's wildlife.
Charles Wohlers / flickr

From fish to snakes to bears, wildlife in Vermont face some big challenges. The bear population is growing, and that's raising concern in some residential areas. The number of deer is on the rise, but the state's moose herd is struggling. And some species are being affected by climate change.

We're talking with Fish and Wildlife Commissioner Louis Porter about these issues and others.

Maj. Gen. Steven Cray, pictured on far right at a 2013 press conference announcing the F-35 basing in Burlington, is adjutant general of the state of Vermont. Cray spoke to "Vermont Edition" about recently announced policies affecting the U.S. military.
Angela Evancie / VPR File

During the United States' longrunning conflict in Afghanistan, Vermont Guard soldiers and airmen have been deployed to the country multiple times. When President Donald Trump announced a troop increase in Afghanistan earlier this month, it came as no surprise to Maj. Gen. Steven Cray, adjutant general of the state of Vermont.

Cray spoke to Vermont Edition about how the troop increase might affect those who serve in the Vermont Guard and also discussed the president's stated objective to ban transgender people from serving in the U.S. armed forces.

A fight in Burlington's City Hall Park led to a man being stabbed in the neck in August. We're talking about whether criminal penalties for repeated civil violations could stem this type of violence.
Nicholas Erwin / flickr

Incidents of violence in downtown Burlington - including two recent stabbings - have led the police chief and others to call for criminal penalties for racking up too many civil violations, like public drunkenness. On Monday, the city council passed a resolution taking a step in that direction.

Critics say it's a step along the path to criminalizing poverty and homelessness. We're hearing the debate.

This interview originally aired in September 2016: Ben Matchstick and Pete Talbot — the founders of the Cardboard Teck Instantute — stop by Vermont Edition with their cardboard pinball machine creation: the PinBox 3000. The duo talk to Vermont Edition about how the PinBox 3000 works.

This interview originally aired in April 2016: The high school members of the slam poetry group "Muslim Girls Making Change" — Balkisa Abdikadir, Hawa Adam, Lena Ginawi and Kiran Waqar — talk to Vermont Edition about the formation of the group, their inspirations, their writing process and their personal experiences in Vermont. Also, the group performs one of their original pieces "Wake Up America."

A replica of the Enterprise bridge set from the original "Star Trek" television series is seen here in Ticonderoga, N.Y. on Aug. 13, 2016 at "Trekonderoga." The set will now have a permanent home in the town.
Hans Pennink / Associated Press

Visitors to this past weekend's "Trekonderoga" Star Trek convention in Ticonderoga, New York, got to tour a near-perfect replica of the original series set, housed in a building downtown. Now thanks to a gift from the wife of an heir to the Mars Candy fortune, that building will become the set's permanent home.

We're talking to Chief Justice Paul Reiber of the Vermont Supreme Court about the process of justice in our state.
Royalbroil / Wikimedia Commons

What are some of the major challenges facing Vermont’s court system? Does the system have the financial resources it needs to ensure that all Vermonters have access to justice?

We’re talking to Vermont Supreme Court Chief Justice Paul Reiber about some of the key issues surrounding Vermont’s courts.

A blue-spotted salamander poses for its close-up. We're checking in on the amphibians and reptiles of Vermont.
Kiley Briggs / courtesy of the Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas

Here's a word you might not know: herp (verb). It means to search for reptiles and amphibians. If you're a herper (noun) - either a dabbler or a full-blown frog freak - you won't want to miss this Vermont Edition. We're talking with local guru Jim Andrews; he'll give us an update on the cold-blooded world and answer your questions. 

On this "Vermont Edition," we're talking about a new push for highway safety by state and local law enforcement across the state.
Doug Kerr / flickr

Following a recent rash of traffic fatalities, state and local law enforcement officials are conducting high-visibility campaigns to encourage Vermonters to use their seatbelts and to slow down. On this Vermont Edition, we're looking at efforts to improve highway safety in Vermont.

Nicholas Erwin / flickr

Next week, people across the country will turn their eyes - hopefully safely protected - to the skies to watch a rare solar eclipse. We're looking up too. We'll talk about the eclipse, and about stargazing, astronomy, and all the latest from space - including the dramatic final mission of the Saturn probe Cassini. 

Brittany Caine-Conley, Congregate Charlottesville's lead organizer, speaks to those gathered at a vigil on Sunday, Aug. 13 at the site where the day before a car crashed into people protesting a white nationalist rally in the city.
Steve Helber / Associated Press

White supremacy, violence and even death played out in the streets of Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend. On this Vermont Edition, we'll discuss how we talk about these recent events and also look at what we can do here to address the issues raised.

We're talking about the impact of income sensitivity on school budgets across the state.
Don Kurto / iStock

Vermont has a program – known as income sensitivity - that allows some homeowners to pay their school taxes based on their income and not the value of their property.

VPR's Gunshots project explores the role of guns in life - and death - in Vermont through commentary, data and in depth reporting. We'll discuss the data and hear from you.
Taylor Dobbs, Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

This week, VPR has been presenting a project called Gunshots — our team compiled and analyzed data from every recorded gun death in the state over six years. VPR's Taylor Dobbs joins us to discuss the project, and the data.

A researcher at St. Michael's College in Colchester has been awarded more than $365,865 by the National Institutes of Health to conduct research into young people and e-cigarettes.

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