Sam Gale Rosen

Vermont Edition Managing Editor

Sam Gale Rosen is managing editor for Vermont Edition. He joined VPR in 2015 after working for six years at WBUR Boston as a producer for On Point.

Sam studied history and literature at Harvard University and was born and raised in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

Ways to Connect

morkeman / iStock

Do we need to fundamentally rethink the way we understand and treat mental illness?

In a new book, psychologist Ronald Miller argues that mental health practitioners need to break away from the prevailing modes of diagnosis and treatment, and look to alternative models. He calls for what he calls "a pragmatic view" of mental illness, focused on whatever best relieves human suffering, and less reliance on medication.

Christophe Boisson / Thinkstock

There is a long history of military engagements between the United States and Canada, including secret full-scale invasion plans from as recent as the '20s and '30s.

Vermont Edition spoke to author Kevin Lippert about these plans, and his new book, War Plan Red: The United States' Secret Plan to Invade Canada and Canada's Secret Plan to Invade the United States.

Toby Talbot / AP

Vermont's solar boom is here, and it's only getting bigger. The state's push for renewable energy means more solar projects, of many different scales, coming down the line. And there's a lot left to work out, on many fronts.

J. David Bohl / Shelburne Museum

In 1839, Bennington cabinet-maker Hastings Kendrick placed an advertisement in the Vermont Gazette. His tagline? "Rich and tasty furniture." The Shelburne Museum used that phrase as the title for their big new exhibit: "Rich and Tasty: Vermont Furniture to 1850."

The Vermont Pension Investment Committee is considering divesting its portfolio from companies that support the fossil fuel industry for the third time in two years. Climate activists were present at the meeting held on the morning of July 28, but not in the numbers that were anticipated.

Chris Pecoraro / iStock.com

Nothing says summer quite like a good ghost story. But what could be worse than sitting around a campfire, having your turn come up to spin a tale, and drawing a blank? Or worse, telling a story that just isn't scary?

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Congressman Peter Welch says he's optimistic that President Obama's new agreement with Iran is the best way to prevent Iran from developing a nuclear weapon. He's also been pushing for a long term transportation funding bill, as opposed to the stopgap measure that just passed in the House.

Bruce Duncan

The Terasem Movement Foundation is located in an unassuming yellow house on a dirt road in the woods of Lincoln Vermont. Inside, however, things are happening that seem more like science fiction than real life.

A robotic human head sits on a desk next to a computer, ready to discuss philosophy with visitors. In the basement, DNA samples are cryogenically frozen for the purpose of far-future cloning. And computers store the personality traits of volunteers, to be transformed into digital avatars or beamed into deep space.

Editrix / Flickr

Forget decades and centuries. We're looking at deep time, millions and billions of years, and how the epochs have shaped the state's landscape. How Vermont's geologic history has given us the ground we walk on and the mountains we marvel at.

ivo Gretener / iStock

It's a time of increased visibility for transgender Americans, in popular culture and beyond - from Caitlyn Jenner to Laverne Cox of "Orange is the New Black." And the LGBTQ community is celebrating a big victory, as the Supreme Court makes same-sex marriage the law of the land throughout the country. At the same time, transgender people across America still face huge challenges and risks. At this time of change, we're talking about the issues transgender people face here in Vermont.

Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array / NASA

In 1859 people across the country were roused in the middle of the night by a light so bright you could read by it. This event, caused by a series of large solar eruptions, became known as the Carrington Event.

David Garten

It's been a year of big changes in U.S.-Cuba relations. In December, after intense negotiations, President Obama and President Raul Castro of Cuba announced that the two countries would normalize relations. Just this Wednesday, the announcement came that Cuba and the U.S. are reopening their embassies.

We're talking to Vermonters with ties to Cuba about their experiences, what's changing, and what might come next in the U.S.-Cuba relationship.

Angela Evancie / VPR

According to the Brewers Association, 1.5 new breweries open every day in the United States. This helps grow an industry that’s now valued at nearly $20 billion. With the highest number of craft breweries per capita, Vermont is certainly not exempt from this bustling market.

AP

If you've read only one thing by author Shirley Jackson, it's almost definitely her short story "The Lottery," a taut narrative about a yearly small-town ritual - with nasty twist. But Jackson had a productive, masterful career beyond "The Lottery." Some might say, two careers.

In 2013, Vermont passed the country's first law against patent scamming, or the improper assertion of patent rights to obtain financial benefits. These entities, commonly known as "patent trolls," are now rebutting by suing the state.

Charlotte Albright / VPR

Natalie Kinsey-Warnock is a children's book author with deep roots in the Northeast Kingdom, who bases many of her books on her family history. Now, she's helping kids dig into their own family trees and tell their own stories with her Storykeepers project. They've uncovered secrets, surprises, and some unforgettable characters.

Scott Ableman / Flickr

Father's Day is coming up this weekend. We're devoting this show to talking about fatherhood - the challenges and rewards, and how the role of a father has changed over the years. Can you teach someone to be a better father? What's special about the relationship between a dad and a child? And how could we change our culture to make it easier to be a good father?

A deer tick, which can spread Lyme disease.
Victoria Arocho / AP

Vermont now has one of the highest rates of Lyme disease in the United States. Meanwhile the treatment of the disease continues to be a matter of controversy, within the state and across the country.

Toby Talbot / AP/file

There’s been a lot of attention in recent weeks about Sen. Bernie Sanders' bid to win the democratic presidential nomination. In states with early primaries, Sanders is beginning to rise in some polls and is drawing big crowds.

There’s also a large group of Vermont democrats who are supporting the candidacy of Hillary Clinton: Gov. Peter Shumlin and Sen. Patrick Leahy are some of the political leaders supporting Clinton.

Headshot of Vermont Education Secretary Rebecca Holcome pictured in 2014.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

Last week, surrounded by a crowd of schoolchildren in Bolton, Governor Shumlin signed a major new education bill - H.361 - into law. The law incentivizes Vermont's small school districts to merge into larger districts of at least 900 students.

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