Sam Gale Rosen

Vermont Edition Managing Editor

Sam Gale Rosen is managing editor for Vermont Edition. He joined VPR in 2015 after working for six years at WBUR Boston as a producer for On Point.

Sam studied history and literature at Harvard University and was born and raised in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

Ways to Connect

Gov. Phil Scott has called for a special session to resolve the budget standoff in Montpelier.
John Dillon / VPR

Gov. Phil Scott has called lawmakers back to Montpelier for a special session next week to resolve the standoff over the state budget and property tax rates. We're convening a roundtable of political reporters to discuss what might happen next.

Lawmakers gathered in the Senate at the kickoff of the biennium in 2017. Now, lawmakers will return for a special session next week.
Angela Evancie / VPR File

Lawmakers and the Scott administration remain in a standoff after the state budget was passed with broad support from the legislature. Now, the governor has said he will call lawmakers back to a special session next week. VPR's Peter Hirschfeld joined Vermont Edition to talk about what happens next in Montpelier.

The minimum wage bill passed by the legislature would raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024. The current minimum wage is $10.50 an hour.
Photo by Angela Evancie, illustration by Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

The Vermont legislature has passed a bill that would raise the state's minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024. But Gov. Scott has opposed the legislation and it's a target for a veto. We're talking about what's in the bill and the debate over how it would impact the state's businesses and low-income workers.

"The Long Shadow" by Beth Kanell is set in the Northeast Kingdom in the run-up to the Civil War.
images courtesy of Beth Kanell

A new historical novel geared to a teenage audience tells the story of a young woman in the Northeast Kingdom in the run-up to the Civil War. Author Beth Kanell says she wrote the novel in part to challenge Vermonters on how they think about the state's history in relation to slavery. 

As the incidence of Lyme disease and other tick-borne illnesses rises, we're talking about the growing risk and what may happen next.
Erik Karits / iStock.com

The CDC is warning of a spike in tick-borne diseases nationwide. Here in Vermont, Lyme disease is a huge and growing problem, and increasingly, other tick-borne illnesses like anaplasmosis and Powassan virus are a threat as well.

Contra and other forms of country dance have a lasting appeal. We're talking about the history behind the tradition.
Sterling College / Flickr

It's a centuries-old tradition with a wild history and deep New England roots. We're talking about American country dancing, including contra dance. We'll hear from the author of a book that traces the story of this tradition, and we'll talk about how and why it still appeals to so many people today.

VPR President & CEO Robin Turnau.
Daria Bishop

Robin Turnau, who has served as president and CEO of Vermont Public Radio since 2009, is stepping down from her position on May 4th. She first started working at the station in 1989 as a membership and volunteer coordinator.

Succeeding Turnau as CEO and president is Scott Finn, formerly of West Virginia Public Broadcasting. Before her departure, Turnau spoke to Vermont Edition about her time at VPR and where she thinks that the station is headed.

Then Governor-elect Philip Hoff sits on a couch with his wife Joan at the White House talking with President John F. Kennedy.
John Rous / Associated Press

"One hundred years of bondage - broken!" That's what Phil Hoff  shouted to an exuberant crowd of supporters in Winooski when he was elected Governor in 1962, ending more than a century of Republicans holding that office. Hoff died last week at 93. We're talking about his career and the enormous changes that it marked in the state's political landscape.

Kids, parents and schools all are still figuring out how to deal with the increased connectivity offered by smartphones and social media.
milicad / iStock

Kids are growing up amidst the constant connectivity offered by smartphones and social media. We're talking about how parents, schools and young people themselves think about the technology in their lives and how they use it so that the benefits outweigh the risks.

The Rutland Herald was founded in 1794 and is one of the oldest continually published papers in the country.
Nina Keck / VPR File

As charges of "fake news" keep flying, and many local newsrooms continue to dwindle, how much do Americans trust media outlets as sources of information and analysis? We're talking about the state of trust in the news media - both national and local - and how it affects how we form opinions and participate in our democracy. 

Vermont's psychiatrist shortage is making it hard for people to get the care that they need.
vadimguzhva / iStock

Vermont's shortage of psychiatrists means it can be incredibly difficult for people to get the mental health care they need. We're talking about the problem, the impact and possible solutions.

"Super Troopers 2" is being released on April 20.
Courtesy Fox Searchlight

What may be the best-known movie set in our state features syrup-chugging Vermont state troopers and several mustaches. Now, after 17 years, it has a sequel. We're talking to three members of the Broken Lizard comedy troupe, the stars of Super Troopers, and now, Super Troopers 2.

Speakers lined up at the Vermont Statehouse entrance at the "March for Our Lives" on March 24.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

The Vermont Senate has given final approval to a sweeping set of new gun control measures, and Gov. Phil Scott says he will sign the bill, titled S. 55. We're looking at what ended up in the wide-ranging bill. Plus, we'll also look at two more bills relating to guns, H. 422 and S. 221, that the Senate is still debating.

Screenshot from The Winooski

"Locally sourced, organic Vermont satire" — the goal, of The Winooski, according to founder Adam Hall.

Groundskeepers work on the field at AT&T Park during the San Francisco Giants media open house. MLB opening day is Thursday.
Eric Risberg / AP

Opening day means it's time for a Vermont Edition baseball show! We'll discuss the roster changes that took place over the winter, make predictions on who will win the pennant and discuss some of the rule changes being tried out at the minor league level to speed up the game.

The ACLU in several states is requesting that Greyhound stop allowing the border patrol to board their buses.
Appaloosa / Flickr

The U.S. Customs and Border patrol, pointing to federal law, says it has the right to board and conduct warrantless searches in any vehicle within a hundred miles of the U.S. border. Given Vermont's small size and its northern border with Canada, that means that a significant portion of Vermont falls within that zone. The ACLU of Vermont has joined the chapters of several states asking Greyhound to stop allowing agents to board its buses and ask passengers questions about their citizenship.

We're talking about food tourism in Vermont: how it's changing and what it means for the state.
Mark Goebel / Flickr

Vermont's farms and food-and-drink producers are pitching themselves to tourists - not just as the source of what's on the table, but as destinations in their own right. We're talking about food tourism, how it fits into the state's economy, and whom it benefits.

We're asking Sen. Patrick Leahy about some of the latest developments from Washington.
Jose Luis Magana / AP

Sen. Patrick Leahy joins us to talk about what the new national omnibus spending bill means for Vermont. Plus, the Mueller investigation and what may be coming on gun control - and we take your questions.

"The Battle of the Greeks and Trojans for the Corpse of Patroclus" by Antoine Wiertz
Wikimedia Commons

The stories of The Iliad and The Odyssey are separated from us by a gap of thousands of years. But they continue to have relevance to those who have lived through modern warfare. We're connecting with a veterans-only class at UVM that's studying and discussing the works of Homer - and how those ancient epics resonate with today's warriors.

The "News Done Right" web series claims to be made by Vermonters but may be being produced from outside of Vermont.
Screenshot from "News Done Right - Fan Club" YouTube channel

A series of satirical videos about Vermont politics attack local political figures from a particular point of view. They claim to be by Vermonters for Vermonters but may be produced out-of-state. It’s unclear who is paying for them, and the state attorney general's office has received a complaint that they constitute illegal electioneering.

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